The Impossible seems just that

by Anonymous on Jan. 22nd, 2013

Tsunami in Thailand: An actual photo of the tsunami taken December 26, 2004 in Ao Nang, Krabi Province, Thailand. The motion picture The Impossible (2012) gives a very accurate depiction of the devastating effects of the natural disaster.
Tsunami in Thailand: An actual photo of the tsunami taken December 26, 2004 in Ao Nang, Krabi Province, Thailand. The motion picture The Impossible (2012) gives a very accurate depiction of the devastating effects of the natural disaster.Courtesy Public domain photo by David Rydevik via Wikimedia
Natural disasters are a fact of nature, and natural disaster movies are a fact of the film industry. Whether it be volcanoes, errant asteroids, earthquakes, or something as far-fetched as the seeds of carnivorous plants riding to Earth on meteorites (one of my childhood favorites) - the genre has been a story staple since the early days of cinema.

This year's offering is The Impossible, a gut-wrenching movie that portrays the effects of the December 26, 2004 tsunami in Thailand. The main storyline centers on a family of five who struggles to survive and reconnect after a 9.3 earthquake in the Indian Ocean triggers a deadly tsunami that killed more than a quarter-million people. In the film, the family is English, but the screenplay was based on the actual ordeal of a Spanish family (you can read about them here but be aware that it could be a spoiler for watching the film).

Personally, I thought the film was really good and gave an incredibly realistic and fascinating depiction of what it must have been like to have experienced such a devastating natural disaster. The special effects were amazing and I'm very curious to find out just how they were done. Plus it got me interested in re-examining the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami.

LINKS
2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami
National Geographic info
Tsunami timeline
More earthquake-tsunami info

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Your Comments, Thoughts, Questions, Ideas

aldenjames's picture
aldenjames says:

Exactly, we could not stop the natural disaster. But if we survive from this we are fortunate. 2004 tsunami create a great havoc in people's life. Those who survive from that cannot forgot those incidents. Apart from this, film industry got their story line from such incidents and create a big film on that.

posted on Wed, 01/30/2013 - 6:58am
RP's picture
RP says:

I've always been a sucker for disaster flicks. I don't want to be in one, but it always moves me. My small experiences in Florida being hit by several hurricanes is enough. Nothing like the scale of that tsunami. That is terrifying to think about. I think a tsunami flick must be really difficult to shoot as it requires extreme amounts of water and stored/released water to make it realistic. Obviously much would have to be cgi, but there would still need to be considerable engineering to store and release massive amounts of water for close up shots.

posted on Thu, 04/18/2013 - 1:16pm
mdr's picture
mdr says:

Computer graphics (CGI) were used in the film but not as much as you would think. Instead, the director used a 1/3 scale model of the resort to depict the tsunami's destruction in the film, along with a large outdoor pool for shooting close-ups and other scenes with the actors. Here's a good article about the special effects used in the film.

posted on Thu, 04/18/2013 - 2:57pm

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