May
10
2011

Killing Time and Making it Look Like Research

Sometimes we here at Nano Headquarters grow weary of reading and attempting to decipher scientific papers in ways that make them easy to understand.

Take, for example, this sentence:

“The as-prepared gold particles showed good catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol by excess NaBH4, and a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) study suggested that the gold nanoparticles exhibited a high SERS effect on the probe molecule Rhodamine 6G.”

Here’s what we were able to immediately comprehend:

“The as-prepared gold particles showed good BEEEEEEEP for the reduction of BEEEEEEEP to BEEEEEEEP by excess BEEEEEEEP, and a surface-enhanced BEEEEEEEP BEEEEEEEP BEEEEEEEP study suggested that the gold nanoparticles exhibited a high BEEEEEEEP effect on the probe molecule BEEEEEEEP BEEEEEEEP”

On days like this, we like to practice what we call "selective avoidance" and seek out pretty images instead. Pretty nano-related images, mind you – but pretty images nonetheless. They soothe our bleeding brains. And so, for your BEEEEEEEP-free pleasure, we offer you this here compendium of pretty nano images:

Pretty!: Pollen Grains
Pretty!: Pollen GrainsCourtesy Dartmouth Electron Microscope Facility

NOVA - The Art of Nanotech
Remember our friends over at NOVA who made the nanorrific Making Stuff series? This here slideshow was a little buried treasure accompanying it. The images are originally from the Materials Research Society - Science as Art competition. We’re a little partial to the Starry Night knockoff. Van Gogh would be impressed. And if not, then we wouldn’t have wanted to be his friend anyway because apathy gets boring fast and huffy, stuffy artists are tedious.

Sciencescapes Speaking of the Science as Art competition – here are a few more images from competitions in years past. From likenesses of spaghetti and meatballs to a decaying Santa to a creepy Pac-Man to a dotted-dude walking off a cliff to his ultimate doom, there’s a little something here for everyone.
Also Pretty!: Water Droplet on Nasturtium Leaf
Also Pretty!: Water Droplet on Nasturtium LeafCourtesy Stephan Herminghaus

International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge
A video from the National Science Foundation wherein they invite us to “discover the artistry behind the 2010 International Science & Engineering Visualization Challenge winners as they explain the processes, techniques and thoughts behind their entries.” SPOILER ALERT: The very first fellow we meet tells us right out that there’s “no message” to his work. Awesome.

Silver Saver – nanotech in art preservation Think that the old, old artifacts you see in museums just stay that way because they’re in a fancy, climate-controlled case? Think again!
Equally Pretty!: Silicon Nanomembrane
Equally Pretty!: Silicon NanomembraneCourtesy S. Scott, University of Wisconsin-Madison

NISE Net Viz Lab All the pretty, pretty pictures you’ve seen in this post thus far are from the NISE Net Viz Lab. And guess what? They’re in the public domain! That means you can use them however you like without going through all sorts of crazy legal hoops! Whee! Just remember to give credit where credit it due – ‘cause we’re pretty sure you don’t have a scanning electron microscope at home.

SPECIAL NOT-NECESSARILY-NANO BONUS:
The Periodic Table Printmaking Project We could look at these for DAYS. In fact, we have. Take the Periodic Table of the elements, mix in a few block-print makers, and what do you get? Some seriously killer prints that provide visual intrigue for such favorites as Promethium and Fluorine. We will admit to getting a little googley-eyed over these.

Okay kids, stop swooning. Back to work.

Your Comments, Thoughts, Questions, Ideas

THIRD GRADE TEACHER's picture
THIRD GRADE TEACHER says:

WITH MY CLASS I READ AN ARTICLE. THE ARTICLE TALKED ABOUT A GIRL. NOW THIS WASNT JUST ANY GIRL THIS WAS ANNE FRANK. NOW ANNE IS PRETTY FAMOUS RIGHT? RIGHT. SO WE READ THAT ONE OF HER DISTANT RELATIVES HAD CANCER ALL THROUGH HIS LIFE. WHAT CAUSED THAT CANCER WAS THAT THIS PERSON WORKED IN A GOLD MINE AND THEY SOMEHOW INJESTED SOME OF THE GOLD THAT HE HAD FOUND THAT DAY. NOW OF COURSE THEY DIDNT HAVE AUTOPSEYS THEN BUT WE DO NOW AND A FEW MONTHS AGO THIS PERSON WAS AUTOPSIED AND THEY FOUND THIS TINY PIECE OF GOLD CAUGHT IN HIS LUNG TISSUE. THAT PIECE OF GOLD WAS CAUGHT BASICALLY THE CLOSEST TO HIS BREATHING ORGAN AS IT COULD GET WITHOUT ACTUALLY BEING IN HIS LUNG. WOW! THIS GUY'S FAMILY NEVER ACTUALLY KNEW THE CAUSE OF THE DEATH BUT THE DECENDANTS HAVE BEEN NOTIFIED. I THOUGHT IT WAS CRAZY THAT A MAN COULD DIE IN THOSE DAYS FROM A LITTLE PIECE OF GOLD AND THAT GOLD HAS A LITTLE BIT OF NANO LIFE IN IT. BUT NO WORRIES ALL GOLD THAT HAS OR COULD EVER BE SOLD IN A JEWELER'S STORE OR IN ANY OTHER STORE FOR THAT MATTER HAS TO BE WASHED MANY TIMES BEFORE ACTUALLY BEING PUT ON THE MARKET.SO BASICALLY I AM JUST PUTTING IT OUT THERE THAT ALOT OF THISNGS HAVE NANO LIFE IN THEM THAT WE REALLY DONT KNOW ABOUT WAY TO GO RESEARCHERS FOR FINDING OUT THESE COOL FACTS AND THANK YOU FOR ALL YOUR HELP IN MAKING A BETTER FUTURE FOR MANY GENERATIONS TO COME

posted on Thu, 07/21/2011 - 5:25pm

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