Stories tagged Amazing fact

Did you just uncover an interesting tidbit of knowledge related to current science? Tell us.

Want to give your brain a really good workout? Learn to play a musical instrument. Educator Anita Collins explains why in this short but instructive TedEd video.

I had never heard the term polyphonic overtone singing before seeing this video showcasing German muscician/singer/teacher Anna-Maria Hefele's vocal skill. It's very strange and fascinating to watch. Polyphonic overtone singing is the ability to sing more than one note at a time and is practiced by several cultures, such as the Tuvans in Russia and nomads in Mongolia.

Also known as throat or harmonic singing, the technique involves manipulating the resonances created as air from the lungs travels past the vocal folds, producing a melody as it flows out of the lips.

When it's put that way, it sounds pretty easy but I don't think that's the case.

LINKS
Story on io9.com
Amazing Mongolian singer Bukhchuluun Ganburged

Mt. Ontake, a volcano in central Japan erupted unexpectedly yesterday surprising scientists and some 200 hikers on its slopes. So far, more than two dozen bodies of victims have been recovered by rescuers. Volcanoes in Japan are monitored closely and checked for signs of imminent eruption such as increased earthquake activity. But Mt. Ontake came alive yesterday without any warning whatsoever, blanketing its slopes - and everything on them - under a thick layer of ash.

SOURCES and LINKS
The Guardian report
The science behind Mt. Ontake's eruption
BBC report (with add'l video)

Using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV), researchers on the Nautilus Live expedition came across something they hadn't seen before - a rare, purple siphonophore. Personally, I wasn't aware such a bizarre organism existed until I saw this video. But there it is, scooting across the ocean floor, probably looking for something to eat. It may look like a single organism but it's actually a whole colony of single organisms called zooids. Siphonophores are members of Cnidaria, an animal phylum that includes true jellyfish, corals and hydroids.

Imagine the thrill of doing something like this. Adventurers George Kourounis and Sam Cossman, along with two other fellow explorers spent four days investigating Marum Crater on Ambrym Island in the South Pacific. Kourounis and Cossman made two descents into the cauldron to capture this spectacular (if not totally insane) footage. Somebody had to do it.

The Icelandic volcano, Bardarbunga, has been rumbling over the past week but is erupting now providing spectators (and the rest of us) with some very stunning views. Go here to enjoy some of the spectacular photographs available on the Guardian website.

This is so cool. Cameras attached to the space shuttle's solid rocket boosters (SRB) give an out-of-this-world view (literally!) of a launch from the Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral. The video is compiled from a couple different missions flown during the shuttle program's hey-day. All the audio comes from microphones mounted on the shuttle and was mixed and enhanced by the guys over at Skywalker Sound. If you want more, you can watch video of the SRBs' recovery at sea or enjoy various camera angles of several shuttle launches. What a tremendous ride!

This video is both fascinating and unsettling. I feel sorry for the poor little avian dinosaur.

This video, alleged by some viewers to show a humanoid figure and its shadow on the surface of the Moon, has gone viral (over 3 million views!). If it is a man or alien being, he's a very, very big boy. It's also been pointed out that his shadow is going the wrong way when compared to shadows made by nearby moonscape features. Fanciful fun, but that's about it.

Here are the co-ordinates (27°34'26.35"N 19°36'4.75"W) if you want to find the exact location yourself on Google Moon, which is accessed under the Saturn-shaped menu in the toolbar of the latest version of Google Earth.

Since we're smack dab in the middle of Shark Week, I thought this would be the perfect time to show the exciting time my niece's husband, Todd Redig, of St. Paul, MN had during a recent Florida fishing trip. I would have loved to been on board to see this. Be sure to watch the slowed down version of the event that's at the end of the video.

NOTE: the clip, understandably, contains some mild expletives.