Stories tagged Amazing fact

Did you just uncover an interesting tidbit of knowledge related to current science? Tell us.

In this video, Chris Hadfield, the commander on the International Space Station, takes a few moments to reflect on his time orbiting the Earth via a re-working of singer David Bowie's 1969 classic song "Space Oddity". There's been a lot of space imagery set to music over the decades but I imagine this must be the first music video actually recorded in space by an astronaut. Commander Hadfield, by the way, is the same guy who gave us some pointers on how everyday activities are done in a zero gravity environment in an earlier Buzz post.

Talk about microcinema - watch this incredibly teeny-tiny movie (the world's smallest) that researchers at IBM created by manipulating single atoms of carbon monoxide molecules in a scanning tunneling microscope. Then watch how it was made. It's an incredible accomplishment considering the atoms used to create the animation had to be magnified 100 million times!

Unlike US air travelers, sequestration doesn't seem to be causing any problems for buzzing honey bees. Check out this cool Bee in ultra slow motion video from Joris Schaap on Vimeo.The ultra slow-motion clip came to my attention via EarhSky.org. Here's what the site had to say about it:

Scientists say that the secret of honeybee flight is a combination of short, choppy wing strokes, a rapid rotation of the wing as it flops over and reverses direction, and a very fast wing-beat frequency. Wing-beat frequency normally increases as body size decreases, but as the bee’s wing beat covers such a small arc, it flaps approximately 230 times per second, faster than a fruitfly (200 times per second) which is 80 times smaller.

The video was shot at 3000 frames per second (!) and is part of something called Flightartist Project, which you can take part in if you're so inclined. Check out the project site for further information (you'll need to speak Dutch or somehow translate it).

I feel like there should be some whacky music or pun-filled intro a la America's Funniest Videos, but we'll let this video just stand on its own.

Snow job: The statue of F. Scott Fitzgerald had a healthy coating of snow today in our ongoing wintry spring.
Snow job: The statue of F. Scott Fitzgerald had a healthy coating of snow today in our ongoing wintry spring.Courtesy Thor
With several of the past springs being hot flooding years, we geared up our flood cam to chronicle the rise of the Mississippi River outside the windows of SMM. But this spring's gradual melting hasn't created much in flooding conditions. It turns out, however, we now have interesting time lapse captures of the "ebb and melt" of our late snows these past three weeks. You can check it out here. That is, I guess, if you really want to look at more snow!!!

Sounding more like something out of a Monty Python movie, this story actually is true. A Belarus man trying to take a picture of a beaver in the wild was attacked and killed by the watery rodent.

Here's some pretty intense video of a red-tailed hawk trying to get a little eggy meal at a bald eagle nest in New Jersey. Let's just say it doesn't go well for the hawk.

Hold it there just a second, the reports earlier today that Voyager I has left the solar system may be a bit premature. NASA's team following the spacecraft say that they don't consider it to be outside of the influence of our Sun just yet. Confusing? You can read more about the official NASA position on this matter right here.

Voyager !: Voyager I has now left the sphere of our solar system after 35 years of space travel over 11 billion miles. It still hasn't had to stop to ask directions!!!
Voyager !: Voyager I has now left the sphere of our solar system after 35 years of space travel over 11 billion miles. It still hasn't had to stop to ask directions!!!Courtesy NASA
To paraphrase Capt. Kirk, we've now gone boldly where no one has gone before. After 35 years and 11 billion miles of travel, NASA's Voyager I spacecraft has officially left our solar system. Measuring instruments on the craft no longer defect the movement of solar wind, which is the movement of particles influenced by energy released by our Sun, around Voyager I. Following not too far behind is Voyager II, which as covered about 9.5 billion miles. You can learn more about the milestone by clicking here.

UPDATE: Wait a second, NASA isn't agreeing with this analysis on Voyager I's location. You can read more about this brewing science controversy here. Does Pluto have anything to do with this?

Leave it to Japanese engineers. They've come up with a better way to make buildings smaller without the usual mess created by conventional demolition means.