Stories tagged Research findings

Did some big discovery just happen recently? Write up a quick description (1 or 2 lines) and link to a larger story elsewhere.

Here's a video look at fossil pieces of Dreadnoughtus, the huge sauropod dinosaur found in Argentina recently.

Don't do it: A spike in salmonella cases is linked to people kissing their pet chickens.
Don't do it: A spike in salmonella cases is linked to people kissing their pet chickens.Courtesy Crossville News
Health departments this spring have been reported outbreaks of dozens of salmonella cases. But they're not tied to tainted food. The cases are occurring in people who kiss or cuddle with their backyard chickens. So keep your lips off the chickens, okay?

If your buzz from Valentine's Day hasn't worn off just yet, here's news that will do just that. The folks at MinuteEarth this week look at how rare monogamy actually is among the sexes of Earth's species.

Tomato: Not as sexy as you thought
Tomato: Not as sexy as you thoughtCourtesy David Besa
Just in time for Valentine's Day, a new book outlines the aphrodisiac properties of different fruits and vegetables. Author Helen Yoest shares insights from her book Plants with Benefits in this interview. After reading this, head to the nearest produce section and select just the right ingredients to make a memorable Valentine's Day.

Chasmosaurus belli: An adult specimen on display at the Royal Tyrrell Museum in Drumheller, Alberta.
Chasmosaurus belli: An adult specimen on display at the Royal Tyrrell Museum in Drumheller, Alberta.Courtesy Mark Ryan
In 2010, paleontologist Philip Currie came across a very unusual fossil in the barren badlands of Dinosaur Provincial Park in Alberta, Canada: a baby Chasmosaurus belli, a ceratopsian dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous. Only the edge of the frill on back of the skull was visible when Currie first came upon it, but eventually he dug out a nearly complete, articulated specimen. The only bones missing were the dinosaur's front legs.

Currie is professor of Dinosaur Paleobiology at the University of Alberta, in Edmonton, and now, after three long years of lab preparation, he and his staff are proudly showing off their prize dinosaur and getting it ready to put on display at the U of A Museums’ Galleries starting February 6th. "Baby" as the dinosaur is affectionately called, is the most complete baby ceratopsian dinosaur in the world.

New knee ligament discovered

by Anonymous on Nov. 06th, 2013

The human knee: a new ligament has been discovered in the leg joint.
The human knee: a new ligament has been discovered in the leg joint.Courtesy Andrew Scott
You'd think by now - after centuries of studying it - that we'd know everything there is to know about the human body. But this week surgeons at University Hospital Leuven in Belgium announced the discovery of a new ligament in the knee. Called the anterolateral ligament (ALL) the newly discovered body part attaches between the lower end of the femur and the head of the tibia, reinforcing the connection between the two bones. The unknown ligament came to light as the doctors investigated the causes of difficulties patients suffered during rehabilitation from ACL tears, a common injury among some athletes.

Interestingly, it was a paper written by a French surgeon in the 19th century that led the doctors to the ligament. The author of an 1879 paper postulated the ALL's existence but it took until now for it to be actually located. The two doctors who discovered it say the ligament exists in about 97 percent of all patients.

SOURCES and LINKS
Journal of Anatomy paper
ScienceDaily story

Hot stuff: New testing on a fragment of King Tut's mummy reveals his remains caught fire after being entombed in his sarcophagus.
Hot stuff: New testing on a fragment of King Tut's mummy reveals his remains caught fire after being entombed in his sarcophagus.Courtesy Jon Bodsworth
We've documented the travails leading to the demise of young King Tut many times here on Science Buzz. But headlines today just add more fuel to the King Tut woe fire (so to speak). Tests done on a small fragment of Tut's mummy that is held in Great Britain show that his mummy caught fire. And that fire, researchers believe, occurred after Tut was mummified and entombed in his sarcophagus through spontaneous combustion from the mixture of embalming oils, wrapping fabric and oxygen. A virtual autopsy done as part of this research also concludes that Tut died from being run over by a chariot. All in all, not a very good day of news for young King Tut.

For a long time, scientists have known a major volcano complex was under the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Japan. But upon further inspection, they've discovered it's one huge volcano, measuring 280 miles by 400 miles across. You can read more about this huge discovery right here.

Water proves to be the best solvent for nanomachines
Water proves to be the best solvent for nanomachinesCourtesy Welome Images
Researchers from the University of Amsterdam have found that nanomachines work more efficiently when water is added as a "lubricant". Nanomachines are structures just one molecule in size (a few dozen atoms or so) that do work. When researchers added a small amount of water to the solvent that surrounded the nanomachines, the machines moved much faster.

Discovering how to optimize these tiny machines is important for the development of things like molecular computers and surfaces that can change properties.

Researchers are developing nanobots that can destroy plaque build-up in arteries. These nanobots have a magnetic core, which allows physicians to track their position in the bloodstream in real-time. The physicians can then control the bots' movements and plaque destruction via a remote monitor, like an MRI.

This means that, in the future, plaque build-up could be removed without surgery, or other invasive medical procedures. Pretty cool!

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