Stories tagged Research findings

Did some big discovery just happen recently? Write up a quick description (1 or 2 lines) and link to a larger story elsewhere.

New seafloor map: the red dots represents earthquake occurrences
New seafloor map: the red dots represents earthquake occurrencesCourtesy David Sandwell, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego
Researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego have used archived satellite data to develop new, detailed maps of the ocean floor, giving scientists new insights into earthquakes, spreading seafloors, and plate tectonics. The maps are the latest to be compiled in over two decades and provide a higher resolution picture of the ocean bottom revealing features not seen in previous versions. The study appears in the journal Science.

SOURCE
Scripps Institution of Oceanography report

Gesundheit!: Viral illness is spreading through the Midwest
Gesundheit!: Viral illness is spreading through the MidwestCourtesy SCA Svenska Cellulosa Ak...
An unusually high number of cases of Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) have been showing up recently in clinics and hospitals in the Midwest. The U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention says EV-D68 (related to the common cold) is a mild to severe upper respiratory illness that can cause wheezing and coughing and in some cases even more severe symptoms can develop. Some patients can be treated with a nebulizer but others - such as those afflicted with asthma - can develop even more dangerous conditions. In one reported case, an infected child's lungs were disturbed to such a degree, he had to be placed on a blood oxygenator.

The outbreak is affecting mostly school-aged children because they haven't yet built up their immune systems like adults have. And even previously healthy children are getting sick. Between 2009 and 2013 the CDC reported only 79 cases of EV-D68, but already this year there have been more cases confirmed than in any previous year.

The illness can be spread through aerosol transmission via coughing or sneezing or by direct contact with a person or surface containing the virus. The best prevention against the virus is for adults and children to wash their hands regularly.

SOURCES
Scientific American report
Enterovirus D68 info on CDC site

Here's a video look at fossil pieces of Dreadnoughtus, the huge sauropod dinosaur found in Argentina recently.

An ear to outer space: The Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico has picked up mysterious "fast radio bursts" (FRBs) that possibly originate from the farthest reaches of space. The findings confirm space sounds previously picked up by the Parkes radio telescope in Australia.
An ear to outer space: The Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico has picked up mysterious "fast radio bursts" (FRBs) that possibly originate from the farthest reaches of space. The findings confirm space sounds previously picked up by the Parkes radio telescope in Australia.Courtesy Public domain via Wikipedia
Astronomers in Puerto Rico have now confirmed those mysterious and brief sound bursts first picked up by the Parkes radio telescope in 2012 as extragalactic, i. e. originating somewhere outside our galaxy, possibly as far as 9 billion light-years away.

The Arecibo radio telescope - located in the karst hills of Puerto Rico - has detected the same "fast radio bursts" (FRBs) coming from somewhere beyond the Milky Way. The FRBs, also known as "Lorimer bursts" are extremely short in duration occurring about every 10 seconds. The exact source of these FRBs is still up in the air - so to speak - but the new study indicates that at least they aren't coming from anywhere on Earth.

"Our result is important because it eliminates any doubt that these radio bursts are truly of cosmic origin,” said research team member, Victoria Kaspi, an astrophysics professor at McGill University in Montreal. "The radio waves show every sign of having come from far outside our galaxy – a really exciting prospect."

But what the space noises are exactly remains a mystery. Speculation includes all sorts of strange goings-on including evaporating black holes, a neutron star cannibalizing another neutron star, or magnetic pulses from magnetars, bizarre neutrons stars possessing super-powerful magnetic fields.

The study's co-author, James Cordes, a professor of astronomy at Cornell University posits that they could be "bursts much brighter than the giant pulses seen from some pulsars".

The study appeared in the July 10 issue of The Astrophsyical Journal.

SOURCE
Science
News.com Australia
Sky & Telescope

Ever wonder why when someone yawns it often triggers yawning in others? Here's some reasons why:

Don't do it: A spike in salmonella cases is linked to people kissing their pet chickens.
Don't do it: A spike in salmonella cases is linked to people kissing their pet chickens.Courtesy Crossville News
Health departments this spring have been reported outbreaks of dozens of salmonella cases. But they're not tied to tainted food. The cases are occurring in people who kiss or cuddle with their backyard chickens. So keep your lips off the chickens, okay?

If your buzz from Valentine's Day hasn't worn off just yet, here's news that will do just that. The folks at MinuteEarth this week look at how rare monogamy actually is among the sexes of Earth's species.

Tomato: Not as sexy as you thought
Tomato: Not as sexy as you thoughtCourtesy David Besa
Just in time for Valentine's Day, a new book outlines the aphrodisiac properties of different fruits and vegetables. Author Helen Yoest shares insights from her book Plants with Benefits in this interview. After reading this, head to the nearest produce section and select just the right ingredients to make a memorable Valentine's Day.

The Heritage Crew did an interview with the Sheffield Site research associates. Check it out!

Chasmosaurus belli: An adult specimen on display at the Royal Tyrrell Museum in Drumheller, Alberta.
Chasmosaurus belli: An adult specimen on display at the Royal Tyrrell Museum in Drumheller, Alberta.Courtesy Mark Ryan
In 2010, paleontologist Philip Currie came across a very unusual fossil in the barren badlands of Dinosaur Provincial Park in Alberta, Canada: a baby Chasmosaurus belli, a ceratopsian dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous. Only the edge of the frill on back of the skull was visible when Currie first came upon it, but eventually he dug out a nearly complete, articulated specimen. The only bones missing were the dinosaur's front legs.

Currie is professor of Dinosaur Paleobiology at the University of Alberta, in Edmonton, and now, after three long years of lab preparation, he and his staff are proudly showing off their prize dinosaur and getting it ready to put on display at the U of A Museums’ Galleries starting February 6th. "Baby" as the dinosaur is affectionately called, is the most complete baby ceratopsian dinosaur in the world.