Stories tagged advertising

Check out this wonderful visual breakdown of fuel consumption by state made by Martha Kang McGrill. It's interesting to see that Illinois and New York are among the 5 states below the national per-capita average, indicating their dense populations centers provide ample public trans.

First it was restroom walls. Now, advertising is finding a way to creep into our lives in another way: clouds. This story chronicles how an enterpeneur is creating artificial clouds in the shape of corporate logos that can float in the sky and remind you that you need to buy something.

Jul
23
2007

We post this photo with great reluctance: We know that teenagers have no will of their own, and a single media image of smoking, or sex, or violence, or ANYTHING will instantly turn them into anti-social hooligans.  Yeah, right. Photo by ronsho at flickr.com
We post this photo with great reluctance: We know that teenagers have no will of their own, and a single media image of smoking, or sex, or violence, or ANYTHING will instantly turn them into anti-social hooligans. Yeah, right. Photo by ronsho at flickr.com

Hot on the heels of our scathing expose that teenage girls talk too much, comes another shocking report from the No Duh! Department: teenagers don’t listen.

A study at the University of Georgia shows that middle school students who have seen anti-smoking ads are actually more likely to smoke. In fact, the more ads they see, the greater the chance they will light up.

Hye-Jin Paek, an assistant professor at the University, speculates the ads backfire because of the natural instinct for kids and teens to do the opposite of what they are told. (See: Beans Up Your Nose, Don’t Put.)

Paek suggests

[A]ds should focus on convincing teens their friends are heeding the anti-smoking warning because peer pressure has the most direct effect…. "It doesn't really matter what their peers are actually doing."

More damn adult lies.

Meanwhile, here’s a review of an anti-drug campaign which the writer suspects is more effective than the typical “horror story” approach.