Stories tagged fluorescent

May
13
2008

You'd be blue, too: Compact fluorescent light bulbs save energy, but come with a number of problems.
You'd be blue, too: Compact fluorescent light bulbs save energy, but come with a number of problems.Courtesy Tiago Daniel

We’ve written before about compact fluorescent light bulbs – a new type of bulb you can buy for your home that uses a lot less electricity than standard bulbs, and thus reduces pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. But are they all they’re cracked up to be?

Some environmental groups warn that the bulbs contain mercury, which can be toxic and difficult to clean up in the event of a broken bulb.

Researchers in England claim the bulbs can trigger migraines, epilepsy and lupus.

And a review panel assembled by the New York Times concluded that most CFL bulbs do not give off attractive light.

Though a step in the right direction, clearly there are still some bugs to work out of the bulbs.

We've discussed energy-saving compact fluorescent lightbulbs elsewhere on this blog. Now, Popular Science magazine has a round up of the next generation in low-energy lighting technology.

Apr
27
2007


One Billion Bulbs Science Museum of Minnesota Bulbs Change Statistics

The website One Billion Bulbs want to help reduce pollution, energy consumption, and greenhouse gases by getting people worldwide to change their old-style incandescent light bulbs to new compact fluorescents. Their goal: one billion light bulbs changed.

They still have a ways to go. As of this morning, they were around 56,000.

Science Buzz has decided to help! We want to see how many light bulbs our devoted readers can change. If you’re interested, go to this site. Click on “Join the Group” and register. Then, as you change out your light bulbs, record your activity.

The home page of One Billion Bulbs lists the most active groups. We’d like to see Science Buzz on that list! Join now!.

Want to know how much money you’ll save, and how much pollution you’ll prevent, by changing to fluorescent bulbs? Use this handy calculator:

www.OneBillionBulbs.com

(How many Science Buzz readers does it take to change a light bulb? We’ll find out soon enough!)