Stories tagged health

This man is surprised: To learn about the new technology. Because you can also read science news articles on your phone.
This man is surprised: To learn about the new technology. Because you can also read science news articles on your phone.Courtesy CJ Sorg
Believe it, y'all: scientists are developing cheap, disposable chips that will be able to diagnose any of a range of sexually transmitted diseases that you might be carrying. All you have to do would be to pee on your phone. Or pee on a chip, and then plug it into your phone. And, viola, you've got male itch. Or female itch. Or whatever.

Joke about dropping your phone in the toilet, joke about coverage area, joke about app store, joke about loving your phone. Joke about herpes.

Vibrio cholerae: the bacterium that causes cholera.
Vibrio cholerae: the bacterium that causes cholera.Courtesy Public domain (via Dartmouth)
An outbreak of cholera in Haiti is causing doctors and other aid workers concern. Cholera is an infection of the intestines caused by Vibrio cholerae a bacteria often found in contaminated food or drinking water. The bacteria can spread through crowded and unsanitary areas via contact with feces of infected persons. Cholera outbreaks often take place in crowded and impoverished areas, or in war zones. Symptoms include severe abdominal cramps, watery diarrhea, vomiting and rapid dehydration. Left untreated, cholera can be deadly within 24 hours. When detected, treatment involves replenishment of lost fluids and electrolytes. Improved sanitation and personal hygiene practices such as frequent hand washing can help stop the spread of the disease. So far, cholera has killed more than 300 people in Haiti, and most of the nearly 4000 recorded cases have occurred in the region of Arbonite, a rural area unaffected by the 7.0 magnitude earthquake that devastated much of the country last January. The outbreak has been slowing lately, but officials are concerned it could still spread through the hundreds of refugee tent camps located in the overcrowded capital of Port-au-Prince.

SOURCES and INFO
BBC story
Doctors Without Borders website
Unicef website

Bottled Water Obsession: screen capture by Art Oglesby from fora.tv
Bottled Water Obsession: screen capture by Art Oglesby from fora.tvCourtesy ARTiFactor
Listen to Peter H. Gleick explain the connections between water and human health, the human right to water, the hydrologic impacts of climate change, sustainable water use, privatization and globalization and international conflicts over water resources.
Here is a link to his concluding statements about The Story Behind Our Obsession with Bottled Water (3min)
Here is a link to the whole presentation (52min)

[It's Blog Action Day 2010, and this year's theme is water.]

Oct
15
2010

Burdened by water
Burdened by waterCourtesy One Laptop per Child

Thirsty?

When you are thirsty, how long does it take for you to get a drink of water? Drinking water, like breathing air, is necessary to stay alive. So to stay alive, you do what you have to to get some water.

Would you walk three hours for water?

In Africa alone, people, usually women and children, spend 40 billion hours every year just walking for water. Once, when I ran out gas I tried carrying 5 gallons of gas to my car. My arm sockets ached so bad after a quarter mile that I considered pouring half of it out. Five gallons of water weighs 40 pounds. No way I would carry it on my head (an old neck injury would really flare up). I know that carrying that water is causing neck, back, and arm pain.

Wishing for a well

Some charitable organizations are hoping contributions can be used to provide relief to those needing easier and safer sources of water.

With safe water nearby, women are free to pursue new opportunities and improve their families’ lives. Kids can earn their education and build the future of their communities.

They figure that "every $1 invested in improved water access and sanitation yields an average of $12 in economic returns, depending on the project." charitywater.org.

[It's Blog Action Day 2010, and this year's theme is water.]

Oct
15
2010

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Blog Action Day 2010

Water is a global issue, deserving a global conversation. Blog Action Day is an annual event held every October 15. The idea is for everyone to talk about the same topic on the same day to increase world awareness about that topic. This year the topic is WATER.

Water ideas to blog about

You can go here blogaction page at change.org for blogging ideas about water.

Please say something about World Water

I am going to spend 5 or 6 hours today blogging about water. I will put links to my posts in the comments below. If you have time, please use our comments area to talk about World Water.

Oct
03
2010

Human embryonic stem cell differentiation: A: Cell colonies that are not yet differentiated. B: Nerve cell
Human embryonic stem cell differentiation: A: Cell colonies that are not yet differentiated. B: Nerve cellCourtesy Nissim Benvenisty

Another step toward living forever

Stem cells have the potential to become almost any type of body part. I believe they will soon be used to rejuvenate, repair, or rebuild body parts. Look at our past Science Buzz posts about stem cells. Bad knees or hips? Inject some stem cells to rebuild the cartilage. Stem cells also can repair cut spinal cords, damaged eyes, diseased brains, or help a diabetic's pancreas make insulin.

A new, better way to make stem cells

Up until now, the stem cells created by reprogramming adult skin cells still had bits and pieces remaining that were not safe enough for human applications.
"Now stem cell researcher Derrick Rossi of Harvard Medical School in Boston and his colleagues have developed a way to reprogram cells using synthetic RNA molecules." (Science Magazine) The technique is also twice as fast and 100% more efficient. The team calls its cells RiPS cells, for RNA induced Pluripotent Cells.

Learn more about RNA induced Pluripotent Cells

The new technique, is published online in the journal, Cell Stem Cell.

Oct
03
2010

Open fire cooking
Open fire cookingCourtesy Tallia Miller

Smoke in my eyes (and lungs)

Cooking food on an open fire may sound romantic but in reality breathing smoke and scrounging for fire wood make it not so pleasant. It is estimated that the smoke from cooking fires leads to nearly 2 million premature deaths each year.
A Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves has formed to

"save lives, improve livelihoods, empower women, and combat climate change by creating a thriving global market for clean and efficient household cooking solutions."

100 million new stoves by 2020

A better burning stove should not be rocket science but several factors should help the Alliance meet their goal of 100 million households converting to clean cookstoves and fuels by 2020.

  • Recent advances in clean cookstove design, testing, and monitoring
  • Compelling new research on the health and environmental benefits of clean cookstov
  • Recent commercial success and development of a number of business models in the field
  • The advent of national cookstove programs in India, Mexico, Peru and elsewhere
  • The increasing need for effective near- and long-term action to address climate change at the local and regional level; and
  • The potential for carbon finance to fund stove initiatives at greater scale

Learn more

BBC video
Clean Cookstoves/media

Sep
22
2010

Salmonella invades human cells: Color-enhanced scanning electron micrograph showing Salmonella typhimurium (red) invading cultured human cells.
Salmonella invades human cells: Color-enhanced scanning electron micrograph showing Salmonella typhimurium (red) invading cultured human cells.Courtesy Rocky Mountain Laboratories,NIAID,NIH
More than half a billion eggs were recalled after Salmonella sickened over 1600 people (according to the Center for Disease Control, or CDC in September.) That’s a lot of eggs, and a lot of sick people.

What is this nasty bacteria that makes us wonder whether we should let our kids eat raw chocolate chip cookie dough, even as we sneak several spoonfuls when they’re not looking?

Salmonella enterocolitis is one of the most common types of food poisoning and is caused by the bacteria Salmonella Enteriditis. You can get a Salmonella infection by swallowing food or water that is contaminated with the salmonella bacteria. Often, the culprit is surface contamination from raw chicken and raw or undercooked eggs. In most people, it causes diarrhea, fever and abdominal cramping, but young children and those with weakened immune systems are at greater risk of dehydration and more serious infections.

Why don’t they just wash the eggs better? Salmonella bacteria live in the intestinal tracts of animals and birds and can infect the ovaries of healthy-looking chickens. This allows bacteria to infect the eggs even before the shell is formed and voila- you have a pathogen that can’t be washed off of the egg because it’s inside. Salmonella bacteria are often found in the “white” of an egg, although they can migrate to the yolk as the raw egg sits in your refrigerator. Organic and free range chickens have less disease than factory-”farm” raised chickens, partly because of healthier diets and less crowding. Cooking eggs until the yolk is solid kills Salmonella bacteria.

How can you make your cookie dough and eat it too? Buy pasteurized eggs (you can find them at most grocery stores) that have been heat-treated to kill bacteria, but are still essentially raw for all cooking and baking purposes.

Also, remember to wash cutting boards you’ve cut meat on with soap and water before cutting anything else on them, or just have separate cutting boards for meat. Don’t forget to wash your hands after handling raw eggs! Pet food and reptiles can also harbor salmonella bacteria, so have your kids wash their hand after handling either!

Bacteria are everywhere. Some keep you healthy and some make you sick, but making good decisions in the kitchen can keep you and your family from being affected by food-born illness!

(This blog post was originally posted on the Kitchen Pantry Scientist blog.)

Here is an update on my post about California's whooping cough epidemic.

A ninth baby has died in California from whooping cough, health officials said Thursday.
All nine infants were under three months of age.
As of Tuesday, the state has recorded more illnesses due to whooping cough (4,017) than in any year since 1955. CNN

What is safest for newborns? Getting vaccinated or not getting vaccinated?

Sep
18
2010

Dyson hand dryer
Dyson hand dryerCourtesy Mr T in DC

How you dry your hands matters

Dyson, who makes a new type of "airblade" hand dryer, funded research which showed regular hot-air hand dryers could make your hands "germier".

When volunteers kept their hands still, the dryers reduced skin bacteria numbers by around 37 per cent compared to just after washing. But the count rose by 18 per cent when volunteers rubbed their hands under one of the machines. Paper towels proved the most efficient, halving the bacterial count even though volunteers rubbed their hands. That's because the towels actually scrape off the bacteria. Journal of Applied Microbiology

This mesage brought to you by ...

Reading this research paper made me think it was a commercial message written by the Dyson advertising department.