Stories tagged lakes

Jul
22
2008

Eutrophication: Agricultural run-off rich in fertilizers stimulates rampant growth of algae.
Eutrophication: Agricultural run-off rich in fertilizers stimulates rampant growth of algae.Courtesy NASA

Human populations effect lakes

Human sewage and fertilizer runoff effects the health of lakes. It often causes huge algal blooms, kills fish, and creates other problems.

Long term study of "cultural eutrophication" released

For 37 years researchers have examined the best ways to control this "cultural eutrophication" process of lakes by varying the levels of phosphorous and nitrogen added to the lake.

After completing one of the longest running experiments ever done on a lake, researchers from the University of Alberta, University of Minnesota and the Freshwater Institute, contend that nitrogen control, in which the European Union and many other jurisdictions around the world are investing millions of dollars, is not effective and in fact, may actually increase the problem of cultural eutrophication.

Time to rethink current practices for healthy lakes

"David Schindler, professor of ecology at the University of Alberta, and one of the leading water researchers in the world, wants to change current practice in controlling nitrogen runoff by stating that

"Controlling nitrogen does not correct the polluted lakes, and in fact, may actually aggravate the problem and make it worse."

This study done by the University of Alberta, University of Minnesota and the Freshwater Institute appears in the journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Source: PhysOrg.com

I defy anybody to read this site without humming the song "There's a Hole in the Bottom of the Sea."

Jun
07
2006


Canoeing on a Minnesota Lake: Courtesey zanzibar

Hey do you like to fish, canoe, or swim in Minnesota lakes? I can't imagine our hot humid summers without the relief of a dip in cool Lake Nokomis. But how are those wonderful lakes that make our state so unique doing? Well, our pals across the river at the Bell Museum of Natural History are hosting a cool event next week about just that:

CAFE SCIENTIFIQUE
Fishing for Trouble?

Tuesday, June 13, from 6 to 8 p.m., Varsity Theater, Dinkytown, Free

Deborah Swackhamer and Roland Sigurdson of the U's Water Resources Center will discuss the state of our lakes, including how chemicals can affect water quality, fisheries, and human health. The Café Scientifique event, hosted by the U's Bell Museum of Natural History, precedes a Thursday evening fishing trip with Sigurdson on the shores of Lake Como in St. Paul. To learn more about both events, call 612-624-7083.

Should be a cool event with some good discussion and a chance to get your questions answered. See you there.