Stories tagged North Pole

It's been happening the past few summers, but researchers say it's getting bigger each season. It is a lake covering the North Pole during these summer months caused by ice melting in the summer sun. This year's lake formedn on July 13 and is about a foot deep. And since water absorbs more solar radiation than ice, researchers expect this lake to keep growing each season ass the ice underneath gets thinner.

Jun
27
2008

Like this: But bigger, colder, and almost certainly further north.
Like this: But bigger, colder, and almost certainly further north.Courtesy lildude
Put on your party belts and wow-socks: some scientists think that this summer will be the first time in recorded history that there’s no ice over the North Pole! Yowza!

Plans as to just what to do with the newly open water are being hotly debated: Russia was quick to suggest waterslides, but there’s some thought that all the crying polar bears would be a major downer, and no one would really want to use the slides. Also, the Arctic Ocean remains fairly chilly.

The entire polar icecap, it should be said, is not expected to melt—just the area above the North Pole itself, a region covered in ice for the length of human memory.

Jul
16
2007

Brrrrrrr: Lewis Gordon Pugh gets help getting back into a boat near the North Pole after his 19-minute swim in 29-degree waters. He made the swim to bring attention to global warming and climate change. (Photo from www.investecnorthpolechallenge.com)
Brrrrrrr: Lewis Gordon Pugh gets help getting back into a boat near the North Pole after his 19-minute swim in 29-degree waters. He made the swim to bring attention to global warming and climate change. (Photo from www.investecnorthpolechallenge.com)
Don’t you hate it when you get into the shower and it’s a bit too cold? British adventurer Lewis Gordon Pugh has taken that feeling to a whole new level.

Sunday he swam for nearly 19 minutes in the Arctic Ocean over the North Pole. Water temperatures were 29 degrees (-1.8 Celsius) and have been verified as the coldest waters anyone has ever swum in.

Why did he do it? To bring more attention to the climate change crisis. After his Sunday swim, and warming up a bit, I imagine, he said: “I am obviously ecstatic to have succeeded but this swim is a triumph and a tragedy -- a triumph that I could swim in such ferocious conditions but a tragedy that it’s possible to swim at the North Pole.

“It was frightening,” he continued, as reported on his project’s website. “The pain was immediate and felt like my body was on fire. I was in excruciating pain from beginning to end and I nearly quit on a few occasions. It was without doubt the hardest swim of my life.

In setting the new cold-water swimming record, Pugh broke his own record, which he set in 32-degree water off the coast of Antarctica.