Stories tagged Olympic games

Can you beat me?: Think you can outrun a cheetah? Find out how fast they are.
Can you beat me?: Think you can outrun a cheetah? Find out how fast they are.Courtesy Sue Mainka / IUCN
So we're just three days into the 2012 London Olympics and the TV coverage is already predictable. A gymnast or two has cried, an Eastern Bloc athlete has been banned for testing positive for performance-enhancing substances and the guys playing water polo have extremely "ripped" bodies. So how about shaking things up and checking out this fun feature on the animal Olympics, and find out which species, according to the Olympic motto, go stronger, higher, faster.

Aug
18
2008

Are you gonna eat all of that?: During the peak of his training, Olympic champion swimmer Michael Phelps was consuming up to 12,000 calories a day. Do you think you could win eight gold medals if you ate like that?
Are you gonna eat all of that?: During the peak of his training, Olympic champion swimmer Michael Phelps was consuming up to 12,000 calories a day. Do you think you could win eight gold medals if you ate like that?Courtesy White House
For the past week, it's been all Michael Phelps, all the time on the media. So why shouldn't Science Buzz jump on the bandwagon as well. Here's an interesting story from National Public Radio about the food consumption that the all-time Olympic gold medal winner puts down as part of his training regimine. Be sure to listen to the listing of the typical Phelps breakfast. It puts Old Country Buffet to shame, right down to the chocolate chip pancakes.

His daily calorie intake during peak times of training is 12,000 calories. Standard diets for mere mortals suggest a caloric intake of up to 2,000 calories. Ah, now I get it. He's winning all those gold medals by eating a lot. That's great news for me with the approach of football season and all the calories I'll be consuming on my sofa while watching the games. I should be in gold medal shape by November, don't you think?

And if you haven't gotten your fill of Michael Phelps info by now, here's another NPR story about the technology behind the timing systems used at the Olympic pool that can figure out the winners of races who are separated by just a hundreth of a second.

Aug
04
2008

Cleared for take-off: Flips like this off of a diving board are the top-rated cause of injuries suffered while diving.
Cleared for take-off: Flips like this off of a diving board are the top-rated cause of injuries suffered while diving.Courtesy Me
Continuing with our flurry of Olympic-related posts here on the Buzz, a new study has come out analyzing the risks that diving boards pose at swimming pools across the U.S. It’s actually the first comprehensive study done on the topic.

And the numbers were surprising, at least to me. Statistically, a person sustains an injury from actions involving a diving board every hour of every day that swimming pools are open, according to the study. The full details are available here.

On an annual basis, emergency rooms treat about 6,500 kids who sustain diving related injuries. This doesn’t come as a big surprise, most of those injuries involved divers attempting to do flips or twists who struck the diving board on their way back down toward the water.

I don’t know if this is good news or bad news, but 80 percent of the injuries occur on low-level diving boards, those just one meter or less above the water’s surface. And kids between the ages of 10 and 14 are the most likely to suffer an injury from a diving board. Boys are more than twice as likely as girls to suffer a severe injury to their neck or back from diving.

What do you think of all of this? Have you suffered an injury or had a close call while diving? Share your stories and viewpoints here with other Science Buzz readers.