Stories tagged Oregon

Feb
12
2007

Oregon Governor Ted Kulongoski: wants to replace state climatologist George Taylor over a disagreement on global warming.  Photo Legal Services Corporation.
Oregon Governor Ted Kulongoski: wants to replace state climatologist George Taylor over a disagreement on global warming. Photo Legal Services Corporation.

President Bush has been criticized for appointing scientists who agree with his policy positions to important committees. Now comes word from Oregon that Democratic Governor Ted Kulongoski wants to replace the state climatologist, George Taylor, because Taylor doesn't support the Governor's position on global warming.

Some scientists are alarmed by this. They argue that science is the process of searching for the truth -- regardless of whether or not anybody likes the answer. Also, having doubters and skeptics ask questions is necessary to keep scientists honest.

On the other hand, politicians are not scientists. Their job is to implement laws and policies which they feel are in the best interests of the people. And it's difficult to do that if key personnel openly disagree with you.

What do you think? What's the proper balance between science and public policy? Leave us a comment.

Oct
17
2006

Sucked in: Will this harm your development?
Sucked in: Will this harm your development?

Autism is a serious concern in our country today, with 1 out of every 166 children diagnosed with some form of the disorder. But could the sharp rise in Autism (it was only 1 in 2500 30 years ago) be linked to the increased prevalence of TV in our homes? Economists from Cornell University say that the data shows a pretty strong correlation.

Michael Waldman and Sean Nicholson looked at populations in California, Oregon, and Washington using the Department of Labor's American Time Use Survey. They compared this information with clinical autism data and found a statistically significant correlation between and increase in early childhood hours spent watching TV and autism rates.

Is that science?

Well, the authors of the study will be the first to say that this isn't definitive proof that TV causes autism (or that autism causes TV...sorry, bad joke). And these guys are economists looking at population data not medical scientists studying individuals with autism. But that doesn't mean this study is without merit. Something in our environment causes autism and we don't really know what it is. I support any unique thought on the subject that gives us new research questions to evaluate.

Do you have a story or thought on autism? Have you heard of other possible causes of autism?

Jul
28
2006

Scientists are studying a 70-mile "dead zone" off the coast of Oregon.

First noticed in 2002, the dead zone is larger this year than in previous years.

What is a dead zone? It's an large area of water that's very low in oxygen and can't support life. (Scientists call this "hypoxia.") Dead zones are caused by the explosive growth of tiny aquatic plants called phytoplankton. When the phytoplankton die, they are decomposed by bacteria. Massive numbers of bacteria use up the oxygen in the water. Any animals that can swim out of the low-oxygen water--like many fish--do so. Others--some fish, many crabs, and others--suffocate because they can't get enough oxygen to live.

Dead crabs: Dead Dungeness crabs on beach, Oregon Coast (Photo by Jane Lubchenco)
Dead crabs: Dead Dungeness crabs on beach, Oregon Coast (Photo by Jane Lubchenco)

In this case, the phytoplankton blooms are caused when north winds cause upwelling in the water column. The cooler water is rich in nutrients, providing a feast for the phytoplankton. When the wind dies down, the upwelling stops, and many phytoplankton die a natural death. Their decomposition results in water that is deadly because it lacks oxygen needed for life.

This year, the upwelling started in April, stopped in May, and started up again in June. The off-and-on upwelling creates a thick mat of organic material that rots and uses up the oxygen in the water. Then, when a new upwelling occurs, the oxygen-depleted water moves toward shore, killing the plants and animals that can't get out of its way.

Measuring oxygen levels: Chris Holmes (left) and Dr. Francis Chan (right), PISCO researchers measuring oxygen levels off the Oregon coast from the OSU research vessel Elakha (Photo by Jane Lubchenco)
Measuring oxygen levels: Chris Holmes (left) and Dr. Francis Chan (right), PISCO researchers measuring oxygen levels off the Oregon coast from the OSU research vessel Elakha (Photo by Jane Lubchenco)

So, why the upwelling? Jane Lubchenco, professor of marine ecology at Oregon State University and a member of the Pew Oceans Commission, told the Associated Press:

"We are seeing wild swings from year to year in the timing and duration of the winds that are favorable for upwelling. ... This increased variability in the winds is consistent with what we would expect under climate change."

Global warming is also the suspect in dead zones off Namibia, South Africa, and Peru.

(The dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico at the mouth of the Mississippi River is caused by agricultural runoff containing fertilizers. The river carries all those nutrients into the Gulf, creating algal blooms that use up all the oxygen.)