Stories tagged pi

Today is March 14 (3-14) which means it's once again Pi Day, a time to celebrate that irrational number, 3.14, whose post decimal digits go on forever and ever ad infinitum and is represented by the Greek letter pi. Civilizations have known about it and used it for centuries. This short video gives a good overview of its importance.

The symbol for pi (3.14...): and a blueberry pi at that.
The symbol for pi (3.14...): and a blueberry pi at that.Courtesy Mark Ryan
This is a repost from last year because it's once again March 14 (3/14), and that means it's once again Pi Day! That's the day set aside to recognize "the ratio of any Euclidean circle's circumference to its diameter", or in mathematical terms, it's an irrational number that begins with:

3.141592653589793238462643383279502884197169399375105820974944592307816406286208998628034825342117067982148086513282306647093844609550582231725359408128481117450284102701938521105559644622948954930381964428810975665933446128475648233786783165271201909145648566923460348610454326648213393607260249141273724587006606315588174881520920962829254091715364367892590360011330530548820466521384146951941511609... and on and on and on, yadda, yadda, yadda. (It wasn't intentional but I like how the number has gone off the page toward infinity.)

Pi Day was created by a physicist named Larry Shaw (aka The Prince of Pi) back in 1988. The symbol for pi is that thing pictured above. (Yes, it's a blueberry pi - my favorite).

Official? Pi Day webpage
More pi info
The Pi Song (Thanks Pam Hamann!)

Today is Pi Day!

by mdr on Mar. 14th, 2012

The symbol for pi (3.14...): and a blueberry pi at that.
The symbol for pi (3.14...): and a blueberry pi at that.Courtesy Mark Ryan
It's once again March 14 (3/14), and that means it's once again Pi Day! That's the day set aside to recognize "the ratio of any Euclidean circle's circumference to its diameter", or in mathematical terms, it's an irrational number that begins with:

3.141592653589793238462643383279502884197169399375105820974944592307816406286208998628034825342117067982148086513282306647093844609550582231725359408128481117450284102701938521105559644622948954930381964428810975665933446128475648233786783165271201909145648566923460348610454326648213393607260249141273724587006606315588174881520920962829254091715364367892590360011330530548820466521384146951941511609... and on and on and on, yadda, yadda, yadda. (It wasn't intentional but I like how the number has gone off the page toward infinity.)

Pi Day was created by a physicist named Larry Shaw back in 1988. The symbol for pi is that thing pictured above. (Yes, it's a blueberry pi - my favorite).

Official? Pi Day webpage
More pi info
The Pi Song (Thanks Pam Hamann!)

Pi are squared; cake are round: Photo courtesy LeJyBy at Flickr Creative Commons
Pi are squared; cake are round: Photo courtesy LeJyBy at Flickr Creative Commons
Using a desktop computer, a scientist says he's calculated pi to almost 2.7 trillion digits! That's enough information to fill more than a thousand gigabytes (one terrabyte) of hard drive space, and would take more than 49,000 years of around-the-clock counting to count at one number per second. Could this mean more slices for everyone? Let's hope so.

SOURCE
BBC report

Happy Pi Day!

by mdr on Mar. 14th, 2009

Pi are squared; cake are round: Photo courtesy LeJyBy at Flickr Creative Commons
Pi are squared; cake are round: Photo courtesy LeJyBy at Flickr Creative Commons
Today, March 14th, is Pi Day, a celebration of the symbol for the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter. Pi is simply represented by the number 3.14 but with it being an irrational number, math geeks around the world mark the day impressing each other with how many numbers after the decimal point they can recite from memory. Sounds like a blast.

Pi is also a movie by Darren Aronosky and the 16th letter in the Greek alphabet.

Pi Day
History of Pi

Jun
19
2008

A different crop circle: This one was created by confused cattle. Amazing.
A different crop circle: This one was created by confused cattle. Amazing.Courtesy Alan L. Baughman
Want to blow some minds, Buzzketeers? You’ve got a couple of options.

The first and most obvious route to some serious brain-blasting is to become a motorcycle stunt jumper. I don’t care if you aren’t into engines and broken bones; if you see a man in a cape riding a dirtbike fly over 30 flaming school buses, your brain will ooze out your ear holes (in the most awesome way).

The other option is to learn some math. It doesn’t have to be too much math—a lot of people couldn’t tell trig if it bit them in the calc, and so a little math can go a long way. And if you can combine that math with another skill…minds will be blown.

Take, for example, the latest, greatest crop circle. Now, we all know that crop circles are made by aliens, right? Duh. It’s a case of Occam’s razor—the simplest explanation is the best. So we have unusual patterns battered into fields of crops. What’s the explanation with the fewest assumptions? That beings we have never encountered traveled from a place we know nothing about, and use their very likely highly advanced minds and inter-stellar travel technology to draw circles and things in our food for reasons we can’t fathom.

For the sake of argument and education, however, let’s pretend that crop circles have a much more complex origin—that they come from dudes (and dudettes, undoubtedly) with an artistic bent, and too much time on their hands.

So, back to this particularly mind blowing circle. It appeared on a field near Barbury Castle (which, I’m afraid, isn’t much of a castle), and consists of a ten layered, jagged-looking spiral, with a few circles and dots and things. It looks pretty cool—check out the photograph—but it means nothing to me. Then again, I majored in the liberal arts. When the circle was examined by an astrophysicist (or a “professional cleverboots,” as they are sometimes known), however, something remarkable jumped out of the shape: it’s a mathematical code.

And what secret equation or figure is hidden in this alien thought bubble?

Pi.

“The code is based on 10 angular segments with the radial jumps being the indicator of each segment,” says the astrophysicist on-call. “Starting at the centre and counting the number of one-tenth segments in each section contained by the change in radius clearly shows the values of the first 10 digits in the value of pi (3.141592654). The tenth digit has even been correctly rounded up. The little dot near the centre is the decimal point.”

How about that? I wouldn’t have noticed, but now that I’ve been told, my mind is hissing and steaming out of my tear ducts. Or are those just tears of happiness?

Very clever, crop circle-person, very clever. Consider all minds blown. And you couldn’t have done it without your old pals math and geometry.

Check out this page for ten of the most impressive crop circles to be seen on Google Earth (the new one isn’t on there yet

Mar
14
2008

There are lots of songs about pi on You Tube. I liked this one best.

Happy Pi Day!

by Gene on Mar. 14th, 2008

Pi is the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter, or roughly 3.14. It's one of the most important numbers in all of mathematics, popping up in all kinds of equations. It even has its own day: March 14 (3.14).

Pi is an irrational number. No, that doesn't mean it gets upset easily. Rather, it never ends and it never repeats. "3.14" is just rounded off. You could carry pi to a couple more places -- 3.1416 -- which would make "Pi Hour" 4:00 pm today (3/14 16:00 hours military time).

And, since Gene is never one to leave well enough alone, we can go further. Carry pi to seven places -- 3.1415926 -- and the exact moment of pi is 3:55 pm and 35.5 seconds (15.926 hours since midnight).

Extra bonus fun: One year is 365.2425 days. If you had a circle 365.2425 inches in circumference, it's diameter would be 116.26 inches across. Which would make Diameter Day the 117th day of the year. This being a leap year, that would be April 26 at 6:14:50 am. Set your alarm clocks now!

Pi for everyone!

by mdr on Mar. 14th, 2007

Pi r squared; cake are round: Photo courtesy LeJyBy at Flickr Creative Commons
Pi r squared; cake are round: Photo courtesy LeJyBy at Flickr Creative Commons
Today, March 14, is pi day. No, not the edible kind but rather the irrational number 3.14.... etc., etc. which goes on ad infinitum (or ad nauseum if you have too much of it) and has been used for thousands of years to calculate the area of a circle.

Because today's date is written as 3/14 math maniacs around the world are honoring pi on this day. They've been doing so since the 1980's. Coincidently, it's also Albert Einstein 's 128th birthday.

Wikipedia has a nifty graphic that illustrates how pi is determined . Bryan did a previous post a while back that has some more information, including a site that calculates pi to 100,000 decimals! But if you want smaller slice of pi, go here.

And if you're not full after that, here's some more places online to find info:

Math Forum with Dr. Math
Pi Day
Teach pi

Today's featured picture from Wikipedia is an animation demonstrating what relationship pi has to a circle's diameter and perimeter.