Stories tagged sea

A massive algae bloom is choking China’s Yellow Sea and threatening some Olympic events. Many Chinese cities dump untreated sewage into the Sea. Rich in nutrients, the sewage makes the algae grow like crazy. The problem goes beyond the inconvenience to boaters. The growing algae changes the near-shore habitat. And when all this algae dies, the bacteria that decays it sucks oxygen out of the water, killing fish and creating a dead zone.

Nov
09
2007

Bring 'em on: Come on you nasty sharks...I'll take you all on. (Flickr photo by Cayusa)
Bring 'em on: Come on you nasty sharks...I'll take you all on. (Flickr photo by Cayusa)
The Miami Dolphins on the NFL football field maybe struggling through a winless season so far, but their namesakes off the coast of California chalked up a big win a few months ago.

When surfer Todd Endris was surfing near Monterey on Aug. 28, a 12- to 15-foot great white shark attacked him. It’s not uncommon for surfers to be the targets of sharks, who look up through the water to see what they think is a tasty seal.

Three shark bites peeled skin off his back and had ripped his right leg down to the bone. Then to the rescue came a pod of dolphins.

The formed a protective ring around him, allowing Endris to get his wits about him, paddle to shore and get first aid attention on shore from a friend.

I heard Endris share his tale on the Today Show earlier this week. You can get the full report by clicking here. But my biggest question was left unanswered. Why did the dolphins intervene?

Science doesn’t have the answer yet, but cases of dolphins rescuing people go back to tales from ancient Greece.

Just last year, four lifeguards in New Zealand were saved from sharks by the similar action of a pod of dolphins.

One more interesting twist to the story, within six weeks Endris was back on his surfboard riding the waters off on Monterey again.

So what do you think is at play with dolphins coming to the rescue? Do you think they do this for other species as well, or just humans? Share your thoughts here with Science Buzz readers.

Researchers in far northwest Hawaii found over 100 species never before seen in the area, and some entirely new to science.