Stories tagged vitamins

Jan
04
2010

Chicken soup
Chicken soupCourtesy Mullenedheim
I am frugal and am careful when spending money. I remember a businessman telling me there was lots of money to be made in soap and food supplements. They both end up "going down the drain".
Billions of dollars are spent every year on vitamins, medicines and doctor visits. Are there scientific studies that verify how effective various remedies are in our battle against the common cold or flu?

Learn what science says about cold or flu remedies

I think most people accept that adequate rest, water, exercise, hand washing are fully supported by science. What does the scientific literature say about doctor's visits, antibiotics, vitamin C, echinacea and zinc, cough medicine, "Airborne", or chicken soup. I recommend you read the Patient Money column in the Jan 1, 2010 New York Times. Here are just a few tidbits from the article.

Jun
24
2008

The big D: Research continues to shed light on the role vitamin D plays in our bodies.
The big D: Research continues to shed light on the role vitamin D plays in our bodies.Courtesy Leo Reynolds

We've talked beforeon Science Buzz about the link between sunlight, vitamin D and cancer. Well, the story just won't go away...

Here's more evidence that sunlight = vitamin D = a healthier life.

And research that shows vitamin D can reduce the risk of diabetes.

And also reduce risk of a heart attack.

But, just to keep things balanced, here's a report that vitamin D doesn’t do everything – some of the health benefits claimed for the vitamin don’t stand up to research

And here’s a summary of the pros and cons of vitamin D and sun exposure.

Jan
09
2008

Today’s article is brought to you by the letter D
Today’s article is brought to you by the letter DCourtesy Leo Reynolds

Hard to do this time of year. And lots of people shun the sun to avoid skin cancer. But science now says sun avoidance is bad for you. It can lead to vitamin D deficiency.

Your skin produced vitamin D naturally when it is struck by sunlight. Too little vitamin D can lead to some nasty diseases, such as rickets, a softening or weakening of the bones.

Vitamin D has been in the news a lot lately. Canadian researchers have found that non-whites are especially prone to vitamin D deficiency. (Dark skin evolved in sunny areas as a way to keep the body from producing too much vitamin D, which also causes problems. When dark-skinned people move to less sunny areas, their anti-sun defense actually starts to work against them.)

A doctor in Buffalo, NY has linked low levels of vitamin D to high incidence of cancer.

Doctors at the Children's National Medical Center in Washington note that a lack of milk and sunshine is leading to is preventing children from developing strong, healthy bones.

A study at King's College in London suggests that vitamin D may slow aging.

May
03
2007

Sunlight helps the body produce vitamin D, which seems to prevent some cancers: Photo by sooz from flickr.com.
Sunlight helps the body produce vitamin D, which seems to prevent some cancers: Photo by sooz from flickr.com.

For years, doctors have advised people to limit their time in the sun. Prolonged exposure to sunlight – specifically, the UV rays in sunlight – damages skin and can lead to premature aging and skin cancer.

But now, a new report claims that lack of sunlight can lead to cancer, too. A study found that people with low levels of vitamin D have higher rates of cancer. And the body produces vitamin D naturally when skin is exposed to sunlight.

So, going out and getting some sun may actually prevent more cases of cancer than it causes.