Questions for Robert Corbin

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Learn more about my research Have a question for the environmental scientist?

Your Comments, Thoughts, Questions, Ideas

Joann Bloxsom's picture
Joann Bloxsom says:

With so many issues affecting the world today, what is the easiest change that we can make locally to help the situation?

posted on Fri, 03/12/2010 - 7:22pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

Joann,

This is a super question but also a deeply personal one. You could examine your life to see where you might be able to reduce your impact upon the world. For example are there certain behaviors that would help you to minimize your use of resources? All that we do impacts the environment. It could be as simple as reducing the number of trips you take in cars, purchasing recycled products, or planting a garden.

Best,

posted on Thu, 03/18/2010 - 1:11pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

Why have scientist removed, lost,or conveniently misplaced data that states that the earth has been cooling for the last 10 years?

posted on Sat, 03/13/2010 - 3:29pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

First, scientists make decisions all of the time about what data means and what to include and exclude from their analysis. It is possible to leave out some data and have conclusions remain entirely valid.

Second, I think you may be talking about an IPCC (International Panel on Climate Change) 2007 report. Know that this report is authored by hundreds of people and that a few mistakes have been found. This is not really a surprise if you think about how many people were involved in the writing and publishing of the document. I am not aware of deliberate omissions from the report or for any motivation in doing so. Finally, know that the IPCC does not actually do any of the actual research so any mistakes in the IPCC reports do not imply that climate research or the scientists that conduct the research are wrong. Regardless, a mistake in a single report does not necessarily undermine the findings of the majoirty of scienfitic experts in the world. The overwhelming majority of scientists agree that climate is changing due to human activity, and that the effects around the globe are of concern.

Finally, I will say that it is always important to be skeptical regardless of what the majority of scientists say. It is important for all of us to do our own thinking, searching, and analysis based on what the information tells us and even better to make the observations ourselves when possible.

Cheers,

posted on Thu, 03/18/2010 - 1:34pm
Bergie indago and lucille teras's picture
Bergie indago and lucille teras says:

Can we eliminate coal power plants?

posted on Mon, 03/15/2010 - 1:33pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

Bergie and Lucille,

Coal provides electricity for much of what we use every day. I think you are probably suggesting that we get rid of coal fired power plants because of the emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. I would want to know what we could replace coal with in order to meet our electricity needs. What do you think we should do to replace this need?

posted on Mon, 05/10/2010 - 10:38am
From the exhibit floor at Discovery Place's picture
From the exhibit floor at Discovery Place says:

Brandi Martin asks, " What's it liek to be a environmental scientist?"

posted on Tue, 03/16/2010 - 9:11am
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

Environmental Science is really fascinating and fun because it connects us to so many things. Nature, the economy, and the way we live all relate to environmental science. For example, an environmental specialist who plans to repair a waste site, replace a smokestack, or install a new water pollution control system must also be well-grounded in physics, chemistry, psychology, engineering, and economics. Conversely, any chemist, scientist, engineer or economist who advocates for new facilities or equipment must have full understanding of its environmental consequences. These environmental consequences connect direcly to you and I and how we want to live.

posted on Thu, 03/18/2010 - 1:37pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

Brandi,

Environmental Scientists do so many different kinds of work. It is challenging and enjoying work that really makes you feel like you are making a difference. Doing environmental science helps us to think about how we can take care of the world.

Cheers,

posted on Mon, 05/10/2010 - 10:35am
From the exhibit floor at Discovery Place's picture
From the exhibit floor at Discovery Place says:

Global warming?
Coldest winter in 33 years?
?

posted on Tue, 03/16/2010 - 9:11am
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

Remember that the earth has been here a long time. To take one winter and to conclude anything about climate change is not wise in my opinion. Lets use baseball as an example. If you went to a game and saw a hitter hit three home runs in one game is it safe to conclude that he is a great hitter? I would want to see how this player has hit in his entire career. We should look at trends in data over longer periods of time in order to reach more valid conclusions. What if in this hitters entire career he struck out 9 out of every 10 at bats? His average would be .100! We should not look at any one year, one winter or even one decade to reach conclusions about climate change. We should look at much longer periods of time to reach conclusions about trends in climate.

Do you see what I mean?

posted on Thu, 03/18/2010 - 1:42pm
joe c's picture
joe c says:

what will nc be like in 1000 years?

posted on Tue, 03/16/2010 - 2:11pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

This is a wonderfully imaginative question. I do not really know. So much depends upon what we choose to do and how we choose to live. It also depends upon predictable and not so predictable events such as trends in warming, cooling, natural disasters etc. Also do you mean what will north carolina be like in terms of geology, human population, biodiversity, sizes of cities, government, environment?

Best,

posted on Thu, 03/18/2010 - 1:44pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

Have you compared the impact of wildfires , volcanic eruptions and other natural occurrences to the amount of greenhouse gases that are releases from manmade sources?
It seems that the earth adjusts itself.

posted on Sat, 03/20/2010 - 12:42pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

Agreed. The earth absolutely does adjust itself. I guess the question I would ask is can human beings survive the adjustment. No doubt that volcanic eruptions and other natural occurences release greenhouse gases. However records pretty clearlly indicate increased concentration of greenhouse gases since the industrial revolution. One has to ask if forest fires are also the consequence of climate change too. There are many sources of greenhouse gases both antropogenic(manmade) and "natural". You are right to question the contribution that each might play with respect to climate change.

posted on Tue, 05/11/2010 - 8:42am
lexi's picture
lexi says:

Does climate change affect how much rain the earth gets?

posted on Wed, 03/24/2010 - 2:48pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

Lexi,

The climate is determined by lots of factors. It is possible certainly that changes caused by human activities could lead to increased rainfall in certain parts of the earth. Can you think of other possible climate changes that might be caused by human activity?

posted on Mon, 05/10/2010 - 10:42am
Allison Law's picture
Allison Law says:

i've read that there are parts that are drier than usual, or have more rain, or are hotter/colder than usual. and i've also read that the polar caps are melting, which will make a huge impact on the enviroment. do you know any way to stop this, other than doing small things and contacting politicians?

posted on Mon, 05/31/2010 - 1:02pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

Allison,

I am actually not really sure if we can change what will happen but I know we can all choose to live with less. This may be what you mean by small things though...

posted on Thu, 06/23/2011 - 5:18pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

do you like your job? and is it what you want to be when you were a kid?

posted on Fri, 03/26/2010 - 9:12am
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

My job is fantastic and I always knew I wanted to study science and nature so yes it was what I wanted to do when I was a kid. Actually, IM STILL A KID AT HEART!

posted on Thu, 06/23/2011 - 5:18pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

HOW MANY YEARS OF SCHOL DID YOU GO THROUGH TO GET YOUR JOB?

posted on Sun, 03/28/2010 - 1:39pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

I continue to go to school because I love to learn but my college education took me about 10 years after high school. I love learning particularly if it has to do with science and want to take even more classes!

posted on Mon, 05/10/2010 - 10:44am
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

4 years of colleage for my baccalaureate, 2 years for my masters and 2 years for my PhD but I did not necessarily need all of these years of school to get my job. What I really needed was to love learning and teaching and to be really interested in wonder and inspiration. I also needed to know how to read and write and communicate well.

posted on Thu, 06/23/2011 - 5:20pm
Austin's picture
Austin says:

Why does cow poop create global warming

posted on Mon, 03/29/2010 - 2:44pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

Hi Austin,

Another great question. Cow manure decomposes and gives off gases like Methane and carbon monoxide. These gases tend to trap heat and can lead to an increase in surface temperatures on earth.

posted on Mon, 05/10/2010 - 10:45am
From the exhibit floor at Discovery Place's picture
From the exhibit floor at Discovery Place says:

In the future, when the glaciers melt and the planet becomes overun by water, wouldn't it all evaporate since the earth is so hot?

posted on Fri, 04/02/2010 - 3:55pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

Evaporation is in a cycle as are many things. I think that the water would eventually come back down as precipitation. It is all a question of rates. How long does something exist as water before it evaporates and freezes and where is it in time? Do you see what I mean? If water exists as ice it might reflect light. Reflected light does not warm the surface of the earth as quickly as absorbed light.

You have hit on one of the consequences of climate change: Glacial melt. It is difficult to know precisely what will happen but it does appear that glaciers are melting which leads to more water in the oceans which logically would mean more coastal flooding etc.

posted on Tue, 05/11/2010 - 8:44am
Jaiden's picture
Jaiden says:

how does science work?

posted on Tue, 04/06/2010 - 12:34pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

Science refers to a system of acquiring knowledge. This system uses observation and experimentation to describe and explain natural phenomena. The term science also refers to the organized body of knowledge people have gained using that system. Less formally, the word science often describes any systematic field of study or the knowledge gained from it.

posted on Thu, 06/23/2011 - 5:23pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

what is the effect on our planet by chopping down the trees in the rainforests?

what will happen if all the trees in the rainforests are cut down?

posted on Tue, 04/06/2010 - 12:59pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

When you cut down trees it is like a double whammy! Trees absorb carbon dioxide when they grow and make it into biomass(living tissue). In fact the majority of the mass of trees comes from carbon dioxide taken fromt he atmosphere. People refer to trees and other places that carbon is trapped as carbon sinks. They store carbon dioxide and keep it from being in the atmosphere for a period of time.

When you cut trees down they are no longer photosynthesizing and capturing carbon dioxide and are not acting as carbon sinks. In fact, they decompose and give off carbon dioxide which contributes to warming.

posted on Tue, 05/11/2010 - 8:46am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

How can people help the Earth? How can people stop global warming? Could humans and other creatures die from global warming? What is it like to be an enviromentalist?

posted on Wed, 04/07/2010 - 9:22am
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

How can people help the earth? I think this is a deeply personal question. I think it comes down to deciding what it is that we truly need. I think we should try to minimize energy consumption and the consumption of products that we do not truly need. Really everything that we do has an impact from where and how much we travel to what we decide to eat.

Many scientists believe that populations of organisms are being negatively affected by climate change. Salamanders for example live at high and cool temperatures in North Carolina at high elevations. If temperatures warm up and things become dry the salamanders have no place left to go...

posted on Tue, 05/11/2010 - 8:51am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

what do you like about your job

posted on Wed, 04/07/2010 - 11:49am
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

I love the wonder of living things. I love interacting with and being in nature. The living earth is awe-inspiring and it is a joy to be alive in the world today. It is this wonder that makes me want to learn more and more and to respect life and the world.

posted on Tue, 05/11/2010 - 8:53am
Alyssa anthony's picture
Alyssa anthony says:

How do we change the environment where we live what small thing or big things can we do?

posted on Wed, 04/07/2010 - 2:41pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

Alyssa,

There are so many things you can do in the world which have a big impact. Recently I have been thinking about growing my own fruits and vegetables in my yard to eat. This reduces all of the energy that is used to transport my food to grocery stores, it captures carbon dioxide and it makes me feel better because the food I grow in my garden tastes better. This is only one idea. THere are many others. Have you heard of the ecological footprint calculator? Google it and check it out for more ideas on how you can make an impact on the world.

posted on Tue, 05/11/2010 - 8:56am
Elena Geer's picture
Elena Geer says:

Which is better paper or plastic bags?

posted on Thu, 04/08/2010 - 11:42am
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

Elena,

Great question. Actually the very best option is to use cloth or net bags over and over again which you carry to the grocery store with you. An even better option is to grow food in your own garden and then walk outside to havest it when it is ripe.

If you are going to dispose of the bags and they go to a landfill I would argue plastic because once paper becomes buried it does not decompose and it takes up more space than plastic. If you recycle then I beleive the better option is paper since paper comes from a renewable resource(one that can be grown and replaced in a short period of time). Plastic comes from petroleum products which are not renewable and many are not biodegradable.

posted on Tue, 05/11/2010 - 9:02am
LUIS's picture
LUIS says:

How does global warming effect the ocean and animals.

posted on Fri, 04/09/2010 - 12:01pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

:Luis,

Wow that is a big question which I wonder about myself. There are thousands of papers written by scientists and others on this topic. Here are some of the things that scientists believe will happen to the oceans:

loss of dissolved oxygen
increased acidity
increased temperature
changes in nutrient cycling
changes in salt concentration
sea level rise
increased death of coral reefs

In terms of impact on life all organisms have a range of tolerance for temperature, water etc. Some are more sensitive to changes in temperature than others. Many scientists predict a decrease in the numbers of living things as a result of changes in temperature over time. The precise numbers are not known but most agree that extinction will increase if global climate change is allowed to proceed unchecked.

posted on Tue, 05/11/2010 - 9:09am
riley ross's picture
riley ross says:

when did you start being a scientist

posted on Fri, 04/09/2010 - 1:18pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

Riley,

You and I have been scientists our whole lives. Human beings just have wonder built into us and we want to figure stuff out.

The world is beautiful and it is filled with wonder and we just need to klnow things!

The scientist does not study nature because it is useful; he studies it because he delights in it, and he delights in it because it is beautiful. If nature were not beautiful, it would not be worth knowing, and if nature were not worth knowing, life would not be worth living.

Jules Henri Poincaré (1854-1912) French mathematician.

posted on Tue, 05/11/2010 - 9:18am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

how high can the temp get

posted on Sat, 04/10/2010 - 10:53am
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

Theoretically it can get ever warmer. The problem for us is how high can it get before the organisms we depend upon can no longer survive.

posted on Tue, 05/11/2010 - 9:19am
From the exhibit floor at Discovery Place's picture
From the exhibit floor at Discovery Place says:

Jenny asks, "How big of a threat is there in losing the microbiotoa that help sustain life? In what ways are we harming them?"

posted on Mon, 04/12/2010 - 2:28pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

Jenny,

What a fascinating question! Microbiota like all living things have particular needs. When we alter habitats/ecosystems we alter the ability of organisms including microbiota to survive in those ecosystems. I have also read studies that indicate that increased temperatures and rainfall may actually increase certain forms of microbiotia and this might even result in increased distribution of human disease. Climate change and the accompanying extreme events will
no doubt alter soil microbial populations and diversity too.

posted on Tue, 05/11/2010 - 10:01am
bella451001's picture

you being an environmental scientist therefore , i wud like to ask you bout bees .... they are vanishing since 2004 .can you find a possible reason??:)

posted on Tue, 05/11/2010 - 11:58pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

Great question!

Columbia University did genetic testing and found microorganisms(fungi) in the bees that are disappearing. This may mean they are weakening the immune systems of the bees.

A cool aspect about science is that the answers are constantly sought and constantly changing. So this question is still be studied.

posted on Fri, 06/25/2010 - 12:34pm
Carol D.'s picture
Carol D. says:

Will the volcano eruption in Iceland have any effect on global warming? If yes will it be a positive or a negative effect? Will the effect be permanet?

Thanks for answering this.

posted on Wed, 05/19/2010 - 1:51pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

Carol,

A wonderful question which is difficult to answer. Volcanoes do give off greenhouse gases but they also give of small particles which might block sunlight from entering our atmosphere. When volcanoes erupt, they release sulfur dioxide into the atmosphere. If you add water you get small sulfuric acid droplets. There have been many recorded times where volcanoes actually lead to cooling of the atmosphere. In the early 1990's a volcano in the Phillipines released 17 million tons of sulfur dioxide which may have caused a half a degree(Celsius) decline in temperature in the Northern Hemisphere's temperature.

posted on Fri, 06/25/2010 - 12:38pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

This home page indicates Climate models suggest the Earth's temperature will continue to increase. A few questions:

- Are these the same models at the heart of "Climategate"?
- Do these models properly account for how water vapor influences climate?
- Is it true that temperatures actually rose BEFORE the carbon dioxide levels increased?

In reviewing Roy Spencer's website regarding Global Warming, it would seem that there is much more to the entire Global Warming debate than to state as fact that we as a people have caused this supposed problem.

Thank you.

posted on Mon, 05/31/2010 - 9:29am
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

Climategate as it is called is only controversial to those who receive the majority of their information from the media. It is not really scientific reasoning to say that global warming is fact. Skepticism is a part of scientific thinking and I am open to the opinions of Dr. Spencer. However, Roy Spencer, mis-characterizes the recent National Academies Report on the subject which indeed pointed out that there are numerous lines of evidence supporting human caused global warming. ,He also completely ignores the recently-released IPCC Fourth Assessment report, which draws the stronger conclusion that the warmth of recent decades is likely anomalous if you look at data over the past 1300 years.

I am not saying global warming is fact. I am saying that the majority of the scientific community and the data point toward humanity as playing a central role in climate change.

As for your questions about modeling, there is not such thing as an Isomorphic(perfectly accurate) model which takes into account all variables. All models are based on assumptions. However they can and should be used I believe as tools to help us to understand complex systems.

posted on Mon, 06/28/2010 - 9:37am
BRIANNAZ's picture
BRIANNAZ says:

WHAT CAN WE DO TO HELP WITH THE OIL SPILL HERE IN NC?

posted on Fri, 06/11/2010 - 1:25pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

Briannaz,

A wonderful question. I am wondering the same thing myself. The problem does seem a bit overwhelming but for every problem their is a solution. I am starting to think that the first step is to start with innovative solutions for energy generation in our own individual lives. I would also like to go see the problem with my own eyes rather than through the eyes of our media so that I can reach my own conclusions about what is and is not happening. We will be hosting a conversation very soon at Discovery Place to hear ideas about what can be done. There is always reason for hope.

I think of this wonderful quote: Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed people can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has." - Margaret Mead.

Cheers,

posted on Fri, 06/25/2010 - 12:58pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

If the earths atomospher is gettting hotter, from burning fossil fuel then why is it that each year places that might get a little snow durning the winter time are getting more and more each year? Ive lived here in Indian trail for 5 years now and each year the snow fal has Increased not by much but it has increase!!! So where does that leave global warming?

posted on Mon, 06/14/2010 - 8:02am
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

Remember that when you look at a short period of time you are thinking about weather. If you think about how the atmosphere "behaves" over relatively long periods of time it is climate.

When we talk about climate change, we talk about changes in long-term averages of daily weather. The change in recent winter snows may indicate that the climate has changed.
If you think you are getting more snow or if summers seem hotter lately again it could be climate change, In some parts of the world people have noticed that springtime comes earlier now than it did 30 years ago. This could also indicate a change in the climate. Strange stuff! Thomas Friedman suggested we change the name from Global Warming to Global Wierding! 8>)

posted on Mon, 06/28/2010 - 9:31am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

Dear Robert,
What do you do on a day-to-day basis? Do you work at Discovery Place?

posted on Fri, 11/05/2010 - 2:42pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

I do so many cool things! I think about what experiences people would enjoy related to our exhibits. I talk with teachers and students and business people about ideas to improve teaching and learning. I get to think about new ways that Discovery Place can partner with other organizations.

My favorite thing to do is to learn about exhibits or the ideas of others by reading about them and talking with all of the other wonder-filled brilliant people who work here at the museum.

posted on Thu, 06/23/2011 - 4:44pm
SOFIA's picture
SOFIA says:

Why are there contradicting views on whether or not global warming is real?

posted on Thu, 11/11/2010 - 2:11pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

Sofia,

Skepticism is part of science. We always think about and discuss alternative explanations for the things that we observe so that we can come closer and closer to the truth. There are contradicting views on lots of ideas in science. Global warming is particularly hard because it involves a very complex system involving the atmosphere, earth's crust, the earth's oceans and the activities of all living things. This is a huge system! Also it is difficult to even see evidence of change because we are only here on earth for a very short time.

These are some of the reasons for the contradictions. What do you think?

posted on Thu, 06/23/2011 - 4:47pm
elizabeth's picture
elizabeth says:

What is the simplest question someone can answer about climate change to someone who says it isn't real? thanks!!!!!!!

posted on Sat, 11/20/2010 - 1:22pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

Elizabeth,

The climate has and will always change. The evidence can not be denied.

It is that simple.

posted on Thu, 06/23/2011 - 4:48pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

Why is it now within the recent decade that the economy has been taking a strong stance on global warming, going green, and etc. This should have been a issue since the beginning of time, so why care now?

posted on Sat, 12/18/2010 - 5:00pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

I wonder the same thing. Unfortunately many of us start to think about changing things after we experience something really stressful in our lives. With the economic challenges we have faced everyone is thinking about how to live more efficiently, to save money on energy use etc.

When we experience really hard times sometimes we re-think the way we are living.

posted on Thu, 06/23/2011 - 4:49pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

WHAT DO YOU LIKE BEST TO LEARN ABOUT ????

posted on Wed, 12/22/2010 - 3:54pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

I have found that I am interested in all sorts of things but my favorite source of inspiration is Science, Nature, and Philosophy. But you know what I have also found that these things are connected to everything else so I think all learning is great!

posted on Thu, 06/23/2011 - 4:51pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

does the point base acidity of the stratosohere have a quantative inverse effect on the co2 amd methane levels in our atmosphere?

posted on Tue, 12/28/2010 - 12:19pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

The marked decrease of the CO2 concentration in the lower stratosphere compared with the upper troposphere suggests that, contrary to previous practice, it is wrong to assume a constant mixing-ratio of CO2 in the troposphere and stratosphere.

posted on Thu, 06/23/2011 - 5:06pm
Aidan's picture
Aidan says:

will hurricane seasons become longer and more intense as global warming increases?

posted on Tue, 12/28/2010 - 3:08pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

It is difficult to know for sure but recent scientific evidence suggests a link between the destructive power (or intensity) of hurricanes and higher ocean temperatures, driven in large part by global warming.

posted on Thu, 06/23/2011 - 5:15pm
Bill Diskin's picture
Bill Diskin says:

Are current political agendas limiting the ability of scientists to make progress on limate change?

posted on Tue, 03/15/2011 - 1:43pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

I think personally that political agendas do not have as much influence on individual behavior as we would like to think. What we do regardless of politics is the most important way to influence climate change.

posted on Thu, 06/23/2011 - 5:12pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

What is the best arguement to make for the existance of global warming when some people claim that we have had the "coldest winter in 33 years" and global warming, or climate change," must therefore not exist?

posted on Sat, 04/16/2011 - 4:36pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

Remember that when you look at a short period of time you are thinking about weather. If you think about how the atmosphere "behaves" over relatively long periods of time it is climate.

When we talk about climate change, we talk about changes in long-term averages of daily weather. The change in recent winter snows may indicate that the climate has changed.
If you think you are getting more snow or if summers seem hotter lately again it could be climate change, In some parts of the world people have noticed that springtime comes earlier now than it did 30 years ago. This could also indicate a change in the climate. Strange stuff! Thomas Friedman suggested we change the name from Global Warming to Global Wierding! 8>)

posted on Thu, 06/23/2011 - 5:11pm
Briana Deese's picture
Briana Deese says:

how did you decide to become an enviromental scientist!? how did you know it was your "calling"?

posted on Mon, 04/18/2011 - 10:06am
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

I just love nature and am in awe of life. The idea that we can study what makes the world work has been enticing to me since I was 8 years old. I love the world and the things that live in it, on it and I love the world itself.

posted on Thu, 06/23/2011 - 5:09pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

how are we (human) an ecosystem?

posted on Tue, 04/19/2011 - 8:33am
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

Such a novel question!

Well I think of ecosystems as a complex set of relationships between the living and non-living things in an area. Our bodies contain living bacteria and other microorganisms that compete with one another for food, water, space, and shelter. All ecosystems can be thought of as running on matter and energy too. If you think about we put matter in form of food in our mouths in order to get energy in order to run so we are actually ecosystems!

posted on Thu, 06/23/2011 - 4:41pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

What are some worthwhile project ideas for fourth grade homeschoolers relative to global warming and protecting our environment? (note: we are already recylers)
Thank you.

posted on Thu, 04/21/2011 - 12:46pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

Wow! there are so many cool things you could measure.

It might be neat to try to figure out how to measure things in the atmosphere over time. For example, how would you measure humidity, temperature, carbon dioxide in the atmosphere? Another idea is to see if you can find out what sorts of living things survive in certain temperature ranges.

Measuring sunlight, or particles in the air is another.

posted on Thu, 06/23/2011 - 4:38pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

Is it possible that "artificial trees" could reverse global warming?

posted on Thu, 04/28/2011 - 1:08pm
Robert Corbin's picture
Robert Corbin says:

Interesting question. Photosynthesis is a remarkable process that turns Carbon Dioxide into sugars for trees to grow. I think you have a great idea. How could we mimic photosynthesis with man made machines or devices to remove Carbon Dioxide from the atmosphere.

Hmmm...

posted on Thu, 06/23/2011 - 4:35pm
Andrea's picture
Andrea says:

What is the best part about being an environmental scientist? What do you love to do the most?

posted on Mon, 06/06/2011 - 12:20pm