Questions for Jessica Cormier

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Learn more about my research Have a question for the benthic biologist?

Your Comments, Thoughts, Questions, Ideas

Madisson's picture
Madisson says:

why do you like studying that kind of science ?

posted on Sat, 11/13/2010 - 12:06pm
JessicaC's picture
JessicaC says:

See answer below.

posted on Fri, 11/19/2010 - 9:33am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

Do you like being a biologist?

posted on Sun, 11/14/2010 - 2:49pm
JessicaC's picture
JessicaC says:

Yes, I enjoy studying biology and ecology a lot. I get to learn all the interconnected parts of our world and research my own questions about our world.

Being able to use a microscope is also a plus because I get to see tiny details and patters on macroinvertebrates, algae and the occasional crystallized rock, which I would not be able to see other wise.

posted on Tue, 11/16/2010 - 7:08pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

do you study ostracods? can i visit your lab?

thank you
Brandon Leu

posted on Tue, 11/16/2010 - 12:30pm
JessicaC's picture
JessicaC says:

I have not seen any Ostracodes in the samples I have been identifying. If you want to learn a bit more about them, the Science Museum has some information on Ostracodes at http://www.smm.org/mongolia/research/.

If you would like to visit the lab, I would go to the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory website, http://www.safl.umn.edu/aboutus/toursafl.html, which has contact information for tours.

posted on Wed, 11/17/2010 - 1:51pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

Counting bugs sounds like a tedious job. How big is a sample of water, and how many insects might you find in it? How do you take an insect census? And how'd you learn to identify all the different species?

posted on Thu, 11/18/2010 - 4:30pm
JessicaC's picture
JessicaC says:

The sample I am currently counting has over 500 macroinvertebrates. Most macroinvertebrates are found attached to cobbles or rocks on the stream bottom. I sampled the riffle sections of the OSL using a 15cm suqared frame with a net attached at the downstream end to catch the bugs. This frame is placed on the river bed as an outline of the area to be agitated to encourage the macroinvertebrates to let go of the rocks and be swept into the net. To get an accurate estimate of the macroinvertebrate population we took 5 random samples in each riffle.

I use a macroinvertebrate key to help me identify all the different species.

posted on Tue, 11/23/2010 - 4:16pm
jonathan's picture
jonathan says:

how do you fit all the time in your reasearch

posted on Wed, 11/24/2010 - 1:11pm
JessicaC's picture
JessicaC says:

Research can be very time consuming and the data collection must be done accurately and precisely to be able to statistically and scientifically pull information from experiments. Each step in the research process has its own excitement and tedium, but for me, in the end it’s all worth it.

posted on Tue, 12/07/2010 - 11:58am
siri's picture
siri says:

how small are the bugs?

posted on Fri, 11/26/2010 - 2:35pm
JessicaC's picture
JessicaC says:

They come in many different sizes that range from about a pen tip to the size of a key on a keyboard. (1 mm - 1.5 cm)

posted on Tue, 12/07/2010 - 11:58am