Stories tagged Earth and Space Science

Aug
07
2013

A long-buried, underwater forest of Cypress trees was recently discovered in the Gulf of Mexico. The forest, estimated to be about 50,000 years old, was once buried under tons of sediment, heading toward possible fossilization, until the natural forces (most likely 2005's Hurricane Katrina) riled up the Gulf Coast waters and uncovered it again. Hundreds of stumps and fallen logs - some huge - covering 1.3 square kilometers can now be seen in 60 feet of water, 10 miles off the coast of Alabama. The Cypress forest once populated the area around the Mobile-Tensaw Delta when the Gulf's coastline was farther south, and the water level was 120 feet lower than it is today. As the climate began to warm, rising sea levels eventually drowned the forest. The trees all died but oxidation and decomposition were halted as a constant rain of delta silt covered the forest for thousands of years. When cut, the well-preserved wood still smells as fresh as living Cypress, but now that the forest has been uncovered again, wood-boring marine animals are back at work tearing it down.

Live Science story

Jul
24
2013

Green River Formation slab: The head end of Lepisosteus has been partially prepared.The rest of the fossil is hidden beneath a layer of rock matrix.
Green River Formation slab: The head end of Lepisosteus has been partially prepared.The rest of the fossil is hidden beneath a layer of rock matrix.Courtesy Mark Ryan
I've had the great fortune of being able to volunteer in the paleontology lab at the Science Museum of Minnesota. I'm in my fourth month there and it's been a real blast. My first project was preparing (cleaning) the skull of a small oreodont collected from the White River Formation in Wyoming. This is the same formation exposed in the fossil-rich South Dakota Badlands. By cleaning, I mean removing all the rock (matrix) in which the skull is encased. I've also helped patch up the casts of a couple of lambeosaurus skulls, and spent a few days puzzling over a crocodile skull reduced to about 1000 pieces.

Removing matrix: Science Museum of Minnesota fossil preparator Becky Huset uses an air scribe to methodically remove the thin rock veneer covering the remains of Lepisosteus, a fossil gar.
Removing matrix: Science Museum of Minnesota fossil preparator Becky Huset uses an air scribe to methodically remove the thin rock veneer covering the remains of Lepisosteus, a fossil gar.Courtesy Mark Ryan
At the moment, preparators been working on the remains of a 52 million year-old gar collected from the Green River Formation in southwestern Wyoming. Most of the work is being done by the more experienced volunteers in the lab but I've been able to help a little, taking my turn with the air scribe to reveal some caudal scales in their rocky grave. This particular specimen, an ancient member of Lepisosteus, was collected in Lincoln County, Wyoming. It's fascinating work uncovering something that last saw sunlight more than 50 million years ago. Now, at least, its remains can bask in the glare of the paleo lab's artificial lights.

Lepisosteus tail comes to light: SMM paleo lab technician, Kay Blair, works at revealing the 52 million year-old gar's tail rays and posterior scales.
Lepisosteus tail comes to light: SMM paleo lab technician, Kay Blair, works at revealing the 52 million year-old gar's tail rays and posterior scales.Courtesy Mark Ryan
Fifty some million years ago, the gar lived in a large body of water known as Fossil Lake, one of three intermountain lakes that existed at different times in a sub-tropical environment in that part of Wyoming. The intermountain basin in and around the lake teemed with both floral and faunal life that over about 4000 years lived and died and were fossilized forming one of the great Lagerstätten in the world. The surrounding mountains were composed mainly of limestone, and the rivers and streams eroding those mountains carried high levels of calcite (CaC3) into the lake, resulting in a high sedimentation rate that added to the ideal fossilization environment.

(More about the Green River lakes and fossils in previous Buzz story).

Most of the fossils coming out of the Fossil Lake strata have been fossilized by a process called permineralization, where mineral-rich water permeates all the spaces and pores in the skeleton and the minerals (in this case calcite) crystallize out of the water replacing bone material down to the cellular level. Some carbonization is also involved. This process depletes the remains of volatiles and is caused by the heat and pressure of sediment compression, which also crushes and flattens the fossils, and tends to color them either brown or black.

Scattered bones: The fossil gar's head was blown apart by gases that built up during its decomposition.
Scattered bones: The fossil gar's head was blown apart by gases that built up during its decomposition.Courtesy Mark Ryan
That's very apparent with our gar. Although only portions of the fish's remains have been exhumed (its head and tail) the fossil is already providing some information about what followed the gar's death (taphonomy). Lepisosteus favored the shallow, swampy edges of Fossil Lake and when it died it probably floated on the surface for a while giving bacteria time to enter its mouth and gills and begin their decomposition work before the corpse was buried beneath sediments.

We can deduce this scenario by the manner the remains are preserved. The bones of the gar's skull and jaws are scattered and jumbled in a mish-mash of bones and scales. The head appears to have been blown apart, and that's probably what happened. As the microbes feasted on the fish's head, they released gases inside the corpse which built up, and bloated the gar to a point where it burst from the internal pressure. The mandibles, the cranium, and other bones broke apart before settling to the bottom and are disarticulated. The very end of the tail, however, shows no such disruption. The rays of the caudal fins looking almost as fresh as they did when the gar died half a million centuries ago.

Scales as tough as nails: In life, an enamel-like tissue called ganoin made the diamond-shaped scales of Lepisosteus tough and predator-resistant.
Scales as tough as nails: In life, an enamel-like tissue called ganoin made the diamond-shaped scales of Lepisosteus tough and predator-resistant.Courtesy Mark Ryan
The scales of its mid-section are beginning to come to light. These diamond-shaped structures were covered with ganoin, an enamel-like tissue containing less than five percent organic material. The mineralized tissue gave Lepisosteus a very tough, predator-resistant exterior when it was alive but not so resistant to the bacteria that attacked the gar from the inside after it died. Preliminary work of the mid-section is showing signs of decomposition there but further work required.

One of the major experts on the fossils found in the Green River Formation is Lance Grande, a graduate of the University of Minnesota (and elsewhere) who has been working at Chicago's Field Museum for the past few decades. In the early '80s, Dr. Grande wrote a hefty bulletin titled Paleontology of the Green River Formation for the Wyoming Geological Survey, and has now come out with a new book titled The Lost World of Fossil Lake: Snapshots from Deep Time. In a recent television interview, Dr. Grande talked about his book and about the fossils found in the Green River Formation.

Hundreds of thousands of finely preserved fossils from Fossil Lake deposits can be found in museum displays and on rock shop shelves world-wide. The best fossils were buried quickly and preserved in near pristine condition. Many of these come from what used to be the deep center of the lake where conditions were probably anoxic and burial fairly swift. At times during Fossil Lake's history events like seasonal algal blooms or rapid turnovers of the water column occurred and caused massive die-offs of fishes. Other fish, like our gar, probably just died a regular death.

Progress so far: After several weeks of preparation, the remains of Lepisosteus are becoming more defined.
Progress so far: After several weeks of preparation, the remains of Lepisosteus are becoming more defined.Courtesy Mark Ryan
Every fossil tells a story, and our gar is no exception. Back in the Eocene epoch it lived for a short time in the then subtropic environment of southwest Wyoming, doing what gars do before it finally died along the shores of Fossil Lake. After it was buried, it was fossilized, dug up, and transferred to the collections vault of the Science Museum of Minnesota. A few months ago, it was retrieved from the vault and brought into the paleo lab where it's been worked on each week by several people. Whatever the gar was thinking when it was alive back in the late Eocene, you can be sure it was unaware that its post-mortem life would provide hours of detailed work, study and fascination for another curious life-form 52 million years later.

SOURCES AND LINKS

Green River Fossil Adventures
Fossil Butte National Monument
More about Green River Formation at Fossil News
The Green River Formation: A Fossil Fiesta
Green River Info at UCMP Berkeley

Apr
20
2013

I had an interesting discussion related to the many and dramatic ways a person would perish when exposed to the vacuum of space recently. We discussed the many dramatic and horrific things that would happen. Blood boiling, eyes popping out... Turns out to be a lot less dramatic. Here is what NASA has to say about what happens to the body when exposed to the vacuum of space.

If you don't try to hold your breath, exposure to space for half a minute or so is unlikely to produce permanent injury. Holding your breath is likely to damage your lungs, something scuba divers have to watch out for when ascending, and you'll have eardrum trouble if your Eustachian tubes are badly plugged up, but theory predicts -- and experiments confirm -- that otherwise, exposure to vacuum causes no immediate injury. You do not explode. Your blood does not boil. You do not freeze. You do not instantly lose consciousness.

Various minor problems (sunburn, possibly "the bends", certainly some [mild, reversible, painless] swelling of skin and underlying tissue) start after ten seconds or so. At some point you lose consciousness from lack of oxygen. Injuries accumulate. After perhaps one or two minutes, you're dying. The limits are not really known.

You do not explode and your blood does not boil because of the containing effect of your skin and circulatory system. You do not instantly freeze because, although the space environment is typically very cold, heat does not transfer away from a body quickly. Loss of consciousness occurs only after the body has depleted the supply of oxygen in the blood. If your skin is exposed to direct sunlight without any protection from its intense ultraviolet radiation, you can get a very bad sunburn.

At NASA's Manned Spacecraft Center (now renamed Johnson Space Center) we had a test subject accidentally exposed to a near vacuum (less than 1 psi) in an incident involving a leaking space suit in a vacuum chamber back in '65. He remained conscious for about 14 seconds, which is about the time it takes for O2 deprived blood to go from the lungs to the brain. The suit probably did not reach a hard vacuum, and we began repressurizing the chamber within 15 seconds. The subject regained consciousness at around 15,000 feet equivalent altitude. The subject later reported that he could feel and hear the air leaking out, and his last conscious memory was of the water on his tongue beginning to boil.

So, bad things clearly happen. Just not the very dramatic bad things I, and lots of others, had previously imagined.

Apr
12
2013

How much of terrestrial plant and animal life can humanity safely consume without seriously damaging the live-support systems of our planet? It has been challenging to answer that question because of the difficulty of measuring how much biomass is produced annually on land and how much of this yearly production humans co-opt.

Huge regional variability exists in terrestrial productivity from year to year because of heat, cold, floods and droughts but what is striking from recent reviews of more than 30 years of satellite imagery is how little global variability there is annually. Each year, terrestrial plants fix about 53.6 petagrams of biomass – a gigantic quantity but what matters is not so much the size of annual biomass production but rather that it seems to vary by only about two percent per year.

Recent estimates from satellite imagery indicate that humans now appropriate 38 percent of all terrestrial biomass generated annually. That would seem to leave 62 percent on the table for expanded human consumption but the vast majority of this biomass appears to be not harvestable because it includes root growth below ground and biomass production on lands in parks or wilderness areas that are either protected or inaccessible.

It appears likely that the upper limit for how much of terrestrial biomass that humans can co-opt annually is only about ten percent more for a total of 48 percent. Current land use patterns and projections that the global human population may reach nine billion by 2050 suggest that this 48 percent of all available terrestrial biomass may be reached within the next few decades.
Earth's primary photosnythetic productivity: The darkest green  shading in the Amazon and Southeast Asia are regions of the world where photosynthetic activity is by far the most active on an annual basis
Earth's primary photosnythetic productivity: The darkest green shading in the Amazon and Southeast Asia are regions of the world where photosynthetic activity is by far the most active on an annual basisCourtesy NASA

Apr
06
2013

The distant, lonely Earth seen from the Moon
The distant, lonely Earth seen from the MoonCourtesy NASA (via Zonu.com)
Back in 1969, when Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were making their historic moonwalk, I remember thinking to myself, what would happen if some kind of malfunction on the Lunar Module prevented them from blasting off the Moon's surface back to the Command and Service Module? They would most certainly die, there's no doubt about that, because NASA had no rescue plan in place. But what about Michael Collins, the Command Module pilot who was orbiting the Moon in the mother ship? He was waiting to take his fellow crew members home to Earth. If they didn't show up, he'd be in for a pretty lonely and agonizing three-day trip across the quarter-million miles of empty space back to Earth. I wondered what that would have been like.

Fortunately, Apollo 11 was a tremendous success and all three astronauts made it back safely, as did the 18 Apollo astronauts who followed in their footsteps (including the ill-fated Apollo 13 astronauts), so the tragic scenario never played out.

Lonely Al Worden: Even the loneliest of Maytag repairmen would have nothing on this astronaut.
Lonely Al Worden: Even the loneliest of Maytag repairmen would have nothing on this astronaut.Courtesy NASA
But what would that have been like? Astronaut Al Worden probably came closest to experiencing the profound loneliness of isolation in ourter space, when he was piloting the Command Module for the Apollo 15 mission. While his crew mates were busy walking (and driving!) on the Moon's surface, Worden was circling overhead - all by himself - for 3 days. At times, when his craft disappeared behind the far side of the Moon, he had no communications with anyone - not even Mission Control - and was thousands of miles away from his colleagues, and hundreds of thousands of miles away from any other human beings. He holds the record for being the "most isolated human being" ever.

You might think it must have been an anxious time for the solo astronaut, but his story, which can be found here, might just surprise you.

SOURCE and LINKS
The Loneliest Human Being
Apollo 15 Mission
Al Worden's webpage

Mar
21
2013

Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone: Nitrates washed off of cropland and delivered to the ocean by the Mississippi River feed big algae blooms, seen as red in this false-color satellite image.  Bacterial decomposition of the dying algae consumes all oxygen in the water, producing a large area uninhabitable by fish and other sea creatures.
Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone: Nitrates washed off of cropland and delivered to the ocean by the Mississippi River feed big algae blooms, seen as red in this false-color satellite image. Bacterial decomposition of the dying algae consumes all oxygen in the water, producing a large area uninhabitable by fish and other sea creatures.Courtesy NOAA
Nitrogen is an essential nutrient for plants. So how can nitrogen limit plant growth, given that nitrogen comprises 79 percent of the atmosphere? But atmospheric nitrogen is composed of molecules consisting of two atoms of nitrogen and this form of nitrogen cannot be used by plants.

Farmers have for centuries spread animal manure on fields or plowed under leguminous crops (such as alfalfa which has microbial communities living on its roots that fix nitrogen) to add useful, reactive forms of nitrogen to soils. German ingenuity in the early 20th century invented an industrial process that made it possible for the first time to manufacture plant-usable forms of nitrogen, which made possible the artificial fertilizing of crops.

Manmade production of ammonia and nitrate fertilizers has exploded in recent decades and now vastly exceeds the amount of atmospheric nitrogen converted into reactive nitrogen by microbial organisms around the world. At the same time, the burning of ever-increasing quantities of coal, oil and natural gas converts some atmospheric nitrogen into oxides of nitrogen (NOx). NOx emissions can both increase crop growth and diminish it because NOx gases help catalyze the formation of ground-level ozone and this gas is toxic to plant life.

The huge increases of human-produced forms of nitrogen that are applied to croplands and that are released into the atmosphere and eventually settle out have many unintended consequences. In particular, excess nitrogen washes off of agricultural and urban landscapes and is accelerating the destructive growth of algae in lakes, rivers and coastal estuaries around the world.

The connections between manmade carbon dioxide emissions and climate change are quite worrying and receive much scientific and media attention. Nitrogen pollution receives much less notice but is a dramatic example of how human activities now dominate many of the chemical, physical and biological processes that make this plant so amenable to human life.

Mar
15
2013

Acasta Gneiss: at approximately 4.03 billion years-old, the tonalite gneiss is the oldest rock exposed on the surface of the planet.
Acasta Gneiss: at approximately 4.03 billion years-old, the tonalite gneiss is the oldest rock exposed on the surface of the planet.Courtesy Mark Ryan
I recently attended a geology seminar sponsored by the Geological Society of Minnesota. The event took place at Macalester College in St. Paul, and was led by Jeff Thole, laboratory supervisor and instructor in the college's Geology Department. Jeff is extremely knowledgeable and enthusiastic about geology, and in the course of cramming a semester's worth of geology into the two hour lab, he mentioned that he had in his office one of the oldest rocks in the world: a nice chunk of Acasta gneiss. After finishing his talk about the rock cycle, and as everyone began examining the variety of rock types spread out on lab tables in several rooms, Jeff brought out the chunk of ancient gneiss for everyone to see.

Found on an island in the extreme and very isolated northern regions of Canada's Northwest Territories, the Acasta gneiss has been radiometrically dated to be upwards to 4.03 billion years old! That's a number that's not very easy to comprehend. The Earth itself is estimated to be just a half-billion years older, so the Acasta gneiss (pronounced nice) is some of the very earliest crustal rock still existing on Earth's ever-changing surface. For a rock unit to withstand 4 billion years of the rock cycle - where the forces of erosion and plate tectonics are constantly at work wearing down, reworking and remelting rocks - that's quite a feat if you think about it.

To give you a better idea of the vast amount of time we're talking about here, let's first reduce it to a more comprehendible time-frame. If you were able to take a single photograph of the Earth each year for those 4 billion years (4,000,000,000 photos) and then made a time-lapse video of all those photos (at 30 frames/photos per second), and started watching the video today, it would take you more than 4 years of constant, around-the-clock viewing to watch it from start to finish. You'd still be watching it in 2017, when non-avian dinosaurs suddenly go extinct about three-and-a-half weeks before the end of the video. We modern humans wouldn't appear for the first time until sometime in the show's last couple hours.

Acasta gneiss outcrop location: The exposure is about 180 miles north of the town of Yellowknife in Canada's Northwest Territories.
Acasta gneiss outcrop location: The exposure is about 180 miles north of the town of Yellowknife in Canada's Northwest Territories.Courtesy D-Maps.com
But back to the rock itself. The ancient gneiss is named after the Acasta River, located east of Great Bear Lake, where the outcrop was first found in the 1980s. The exposure is about 300 kilometers (180 miles) from Yellowknife, so the only practical way to get there is by float plane.

Composed mostly of the minerals quartz and feldspar, the Acasta gneiss was formed during the Hadean, the earliest eon in Earth's history. Its composition leads geologists to surmise that it was probably formed from highly metamorphosed granite subjected to unimaginable heat and pressure. The exact origin of that granite is unknown, but its presence indicates continental crust (and surface water) were probably already present in those very ancient times.

AGE BEFORE BEAUTY

Morton Gneiss: Minnesota's younger but prettier "Rainbow Granite" (seen here in a quarry near Morton, MN) has been used to decorate buildings around the country. It's also a popular material for countertops and cemetery headstones. The banding and severe swirling evident in the rock indicates that, at some point, it went through a period or periods of high heat and enormous pressure.
Morton Gneiss: Minnesota's younger but prettier "Rainbow Granite" (seen here in a quarry near Morton, MN) has been used to decorate buildings around the country. It's also a popular material for countertops and cemetery headstones. The banding and severe swirling evident in the rock indicates that, at some point, it went through a period or periods of high heat and enormous pressure.Courtesy Mark Ryan
It may interest you to know that Minnesota has its own ancient gneisses exposed in outcrops in the Minnesota River Valley. The most well-known is the gneiss that's quarried around the town of Morton, Minnesota. At nearly 3.6 billion years old, Morton gneiss is not quite as ancient as the Acasta rock but what it lacks in age it makes up for in beauty. Known in the construction trade as Rainbow Granite, polished panels of the banded and severely swirled Archean-aged-aged migmatitic gneiss can be found decorating building facades throughout the country.

TECTONIC VS MARKET FORCES

An enterprising miner from Yellowknife has filed a claim on the Acasta gneiss site, and has been trying to market the ancient rock. This doesn't set well with many in the geological community, who think the rare outcrop should be preserved for scientific study. They also say the prospector could be misrepresenting the public since not all the rock in the exposure dates back to 4 billion years, and it's very expensive to validate the age of any one piece.

THE DATING GAME

So how exactly has the Acasta gneiss been dated so precisely? Zircon crystals found in the rock's mineral structure trap uranium in their lattices when they form and can act as timekeepers through measuring the decay of the uranium into lead. The half-life of uranium is a known number (4.47 billion years for U-238; 704 million years for U-235), so measuring the ratio between number of parent atoms (uranium) to the number of daughter atoms (lead) allows for a very precise estimation of age. But even zircon crystals aren't immune from 4 billion years of exposure to the elements. Things like naturally occurring radiation can damage or alter them and thus skew the measurements. But by using an instrument called the Sensitive High-Resolution Ion Microprobe (aka SHRIMP) researchers are able to focus a beam of oxygen ions on a tiny unaffected segment of the zircon' s surface, remove atoms from it, and then analyze their isotopic composition. The SHRIMP was developed at Australian National University.

Jeff Thole's sample was given to him by a geologist from the Geological Survey of Canada, which purchased a SHRIMP and used it to date the Acasta rocks. It should be noted that an older Canadian rock unit supposedly exists in the greenstone belt east of Hudson Bay, but there's still some contention regarding this, since the method of radiometric dating isn't the same that was used to date Acasta samples.

Whether the Acasta gneiss is the remaining crust of a protocontinent that existed when the Earth was still a relatively young, hot mass of accreted material remains a mystery at this point, but scientist named the time the Hadean for good reason: back then it must have been literally Hell on Earth.

LINKS
Field trip to Acasta Gneiss outcrop
Acasta Gneiss info by Carl Zimmer
Geologists balk at prospector's plan
More Morton gneiss info

Mar
07
2013

Como Bluff c. 1879: William Harlow Reed stands before the expanse of the eroded anticline in southeastern Wyoming where he discovered dinosaur remains on March 7, 1877. When Samuel Williston arrived to supervise and organize the quarrying of the rich fossil deposits for Yale paleontologist O. C. Marsh, he was told that "the bones are by the ton and extend for six or seven miles!". Watercolor by Arthur Lakes.
Como Bluff c. 1879: William Harlow Reed stands before the expanse of the eroded anticline in southeastern Wyoming where he discovered dinosaur remains on March 7, 1877. When Samuel Williston arrived to supervise and organize the quarrying of the rich fossil deposits for Yale paleontologist O. C. Marsh, he was told that "the bones are by the ton and extend for six or seven miles!". Watercolor by Arthur Lakes.Courtesy Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University
On this day in 1877, railroad worker William Harlow Reed came over a ridge-top with the remains of a freshly killed antelope slung over his shoulder, and spotted huge fossilized bones exposed on the side of the steep bluff located a half-mile south of Como Station, a desolate railroad stop on the High Plains of Wyoming. It was a discovery that would forever change his life.

Reed and station master, William Carlin, began collecting up as much as they could, dreaming of money and employment other than railroad work. They waited several months before announcing the discovery in a letter to Yale professor Othniel C. Marsh, at the time one of America's prominent paleontologists. When a crate of bones - along with the guarantee of many more - arrived at Yale, Marsh realized they were dinosaur remains and hired both men to excavate and send him as much as they could, and to keep out any interlopers to his claim. Marsh knew if he could keep it secret - at least for a short time - the fossils at Como Bluff could give him a huge advantage in his rivalry with Philadelphia paleontologist, Edward Drinker Cope, and their notorious Bone Wars.

Geology of Como Bluff and environs: Diagram created by the American Museum of Natural History, c. 1900.
Geology of Como Bluff and environs: Diagram created by the American Museum of Natural History, c. 1900.Courtesy Mark Ryan
The dinosaur-rich strata at Como Bluff (the Morrison Formation) are found in the exposed flanks of an anticline (an upward fold), the center of which has been carved out by erosion [see diagram]. All three periods of the Mesozoic Era (Triassic, Jurassic, Cretaceous) are represented in the rock layers found there. Besides dinosaurs, fossils of fish, crocodiles, flying and swimming reptiles have also been found there. A significant number of important Late Jurassic mammalian fossils were discovered and collected by William Reed from Quarry 9 on the east end of Como. Reed also discovered and removed the great Brontosaurus excelsus skeleton that stands today in Yale's Peabody Museum.

Professor Marsh visits Como Bluff: Yale paleontologist, O. C. Marsh (right), lunches with his field workers, William Harlow Reed (center), and Edward Ashley (left) during his 1879 visit to the quarries at Como Bluff. Painting by Arthur Lakes.
Professor Marsh visits Como Bluff: Yale paleontologist, O. C. Marsh (right), lunches with his field workers, William Harlow Reed (center), and Edward Ashley (left) during his 1879 visit to the quarries at Como Bluff. Painting by Arthur Lakes.Courtesy Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University
In the years following its discovery hundreds of tons of dinosaur remains quarried at Como Bluff were shipped to Yale and other institutions pushing America into the forefront of vertebrate paleontology, and heavily influencing how museums would be constructed throughout the world. Former denizens of Como Bluff: The American Museum of Natural History's iconic Allosaurus displayed in its fantastic pose over the remains of an Apatosaurus. Both specimens were collected at Como Bluff, the Allosaurus in 1879 by F. F. Hubbell (for E. D. Cope) and the Apatosaurus in 1897 by an AMNH field crew.
Former denizens of Como Bluff: The American Museum of Natural History's iconic Allosaurus displayed in its fantastic pose over the remains of an Apatosaurus. Both specimens were collected at Como Bluff, the Allosaurus in 1879 by F. F. Hubbell (for E. D. Cope) and the Apatosaurus in 1897 by an AMNH field crew.Courtesy Mark Ryan
The dinosaur halls at the American Museum of Natural History have several mounted specimens found at Como Bluff as does the Smithsonian in our nation's capitol. Well-known genera like Allosaurus, Diplodocus, Apatosaurus, Stegosaurus and Camptosaurus are just a few of the dinosaurs pulled from the mudstones and sandstones at Como Bluff. In the early 20th century it was thought that Como had exhausted its supply of dinosaur remains and exploration there for the most part tapered off for several decades. But in recent years, paleontologist Robert Bakker has been re-examining the quarries and uncovering additional secrets still buried in the Jurassic bluffs at Como.

Como Bluff today: The same year dinosaurs fossils were discovered at Como Bluff two other major dinosaur discoveries occurred in Colorado, one near the town of Morrison, and another farther south in Garden Park. Along with Como Bluff, the three sites were battlegrounds for the famous Bone Wars. Paleontologist Samuel Williston was present at all three sites in the early months of their discovery and said Como Bluff was the earliest.
Como Bluff today: The same year dinosaurs fossils were discovered at Como Bluff two other major dinosaur discoveries occurred in Colorado, one near the town of Morrison, and another farther south in Garden Park. Along with Como Bluff, the three sites were battlegrounds for the famous Bone Wars. Paleontologist Samuel Williston was present at all three sites in the early months of their discovery and said Como Bluff was the earliest.Courtesy Mark Ryan
William Reed worked for Marsh for several more years and the two men remained friends until the Yale professor's death in 1899. Reed continued in the field of paleontology, working independently, and for a time with the American Museum of Natural History in New York, and the Carnegie Museum in Pittsburgh. He finished out his career as a popular geology professor and museum curator at the University of Wyoming, just sixty miles from Como Bluff, the great dinosaur graveyard that changed not only the course his life but also that of American paleontology.

Como Bluff was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. It's also been designated as one of Wyoming's National Natural Landmarks by the National Park Service.

LINKS
Biography of William Harlow Reed

Marsh's Dinosaurs: The Collections from Como Bluff

Discovering Dinosaurs in the Old West: the Field Journals of Arthur Lakes

Journal of a recent dinosaur dig at Como Bluff

Feb
21
2013

This amazing video from NASA (via EarthSky) shows an incredibly gigantic eruption on the Sun's surface that produced three different types of events: a solar flare, a coronal mass ejection (CME), and a really interesting and rare phenomenon known as coronal rain.

Coronal rain occurs when hot plasma in the eruption cools and condenses then follows the outline of the normally invisible magnetic fields as it rains back to the Sun's chromosphere. I found that particularly amazing to see.
The images were gathered on July 19, 2012 by the Solar Dynamics Observatory’s AIA instrument. One frame was shot every 12 seconds over a span of 21.5 hours from 12:30 a.m. EDT to 10:00 p.m. EDT. The video plays at a rate of 30 frames per second, so each second equals 6 minutes of real time.

What's extra cool is when the scale of this thing is compared to the size of Earth­. If you were feeling small earlier today, you should be feeling microscopic after watching this.

SOURCE
EarthSky website