Sep
11
2011

The Song of Summer is ending

There I was, sitting on my back porch enjoying the last days of summer, when I heard a sound--"zzzzzZZZZzzzzz"--first once, then again, and finally a third time in short succession. I heard coming from the trees the songs of the cicadas.

The cicada is a large (1-2 inches long) insect with a rather scary looking appearance.

The name cicada comes from Latin meaning "tree cricket" and while they aren't directly related to crickets, they are just as harmless.

About two weeks ago, as I was carrying something out to my car, I noticed a cicada in the process of shedding its exoskeleton to become an adult. You see, a cicada spends years underground as a nymph, feeding on the roots of various plants. After a certain number of years pass by (13 for some, 17 for other species) they emerge from their earthen nursery and climb up the nearby plants to get out of the reach of predators. Afterward, they molt their larval exoskeleton and become an adult. I couldn't believe my luck to have a cicada molting before my very eyes.

When I first noticed it, I saw something pink hanging from my tree. The exoskeleton had already split down the back and the newly adult cicada was climbing out of its old shell, all pink with spring green wings instead of black or brown. Initially, the wings were small green bumps on its back, but as they dried, the wings extended to their normal size. I was disappointed that I couldn't stay and watch its color change while the exoskeleton hardened, because that would also have been cool to see.

Cicadas are a rather delicate and sensitive insect. If the environmental conditions aren't just right with regards to pollution, acidity and temperature, when they emerge the cicadas will be deformed and often sterile. With this in mind, remember that while they might appear to be scary-looking, cicadas are quite harmless and actually a natural sign that the area in which you live is healthy.

Image courtesy of Bruce Marlin
Image location http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Magicicada_species.jpg.

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