Stories tagged Science links

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Frozen baby mammoth: This image shows a frozen baby mammoth, on display at the Field Museum in Chicago, found several years ago by the same research team.
Frozen baby mammoth: This image shows a frozen baby mammoth, on display at the Field Museum in Chicago, found several years ago by the same research team.Courtesy Matt Howry
On a remote Arctic island of northern Russia, researchers have found another fully frozen mammoth. And this discovery comes with an added bonus. The specimen has liquid blood. It's the biggest breakthrough for potentially collecting viable mammoth DNA to conduct cloning experiments to try to recreate the long-extinct pachyderms. The link above also has a nice gallery of photos showing this discovery and a vial of actual liquid mammoth blood. And here's a link to a previous Buzz post of discovering frozen mammoths, the potential for cloning them and the ethics of doing so.

Dead Sea Scrolls: Little scraps of the Dead Sea Scrolls are now being sold, creating new controversies in the Middle East.
Dead Sea Scrolls: Little scraps of the Dead Sea Scrolls are now being sold, creating new controversies in the Middle East.Courtesy unknown
Several years ago the Science Museum of Minnesota hosting a very popular exhibit of the Dead Sea Scrolls. The scrolls are back in the news again with recent developments of scroll scraps now being up for sale on the open market. Most of these pieces are smaller than a postage stamp and contain no writing of the ancient Hebrew texts.

Here's a link to our Science Buzz pages exploring the current science being used to learn more about the Dead Sea Scrolls.

Work with bulldozers and backhoes to collect materials for a road building project has destroyed an ancient Maya pyramid in Belize. You can read all the details here. And then you can wipe away your tears.

Mountain climbing is dangerous. Mountain climbing on a volcanic mountain is extra dangerous. A team of mountain climbers in the Philippines found that out today, five with very tragic results.

Nabbing terrorists: Robotics experts are analyzing how automated devices played a part in apprehending the Boston Marathon bombers.
Nabbing terrorists: Robotics experts are analyzing how automated devices played a part in apprehending the Boston Marathon bombers.Courtesy Mashable
Law enforcement authorities aren't giving out specific information, but robotic experts are chiming in with their thoughts on how robots played a role in capturing the Boston Marathon bombers. Here's a pretty interesting online article theorizing the use of robots in the case. The link includes a video that shows how these robots do their jobs. While TV reports Friday night said that a robotic arm was used to pull the tarp off the boat where the second suspect was hiding, those reports, have now been called incorrect.

What do you think about using robots to handle dangerous tasks involving terrorism and crime?

When yesterday's bombs went off at at the Boston Marathon, chaos erupted. Runners were still scattered about the 26-mile course. But technology was able to keep track of where they all were. You can read about it all here.

To bee or not to bee: honeybee populations keep dropping: Numerous factors are causing honeybee numbers to drop around the country.
To bee or not to bee: honeybee populations keep dropping: Numerous factors are causing honeybee numbers to drop around the country.Courtesy CC/Flickr/dni777
We've posted about this grouwin problem numerous times before, but the trend continues downward for honeybee populations. This recap of the problem looks at the situation from Minnesota and national angles. It also addresses the complex causes of this serious situation. Here's an older post on the bee problem.

A few days of sunshine have really started to melt our snow here in the Twin Cities. But looking at the Mississippi River, you can hardly tell. In fact, the river levels at the official St. Paul monitoring location dipped down the past few days before turning back up. The next flood forecast is due out tomorrow. About a month ago, forecasters estimated at 95 percent chance of the river topping flood stage. Click here to see a graph of the past week's water levels in St. Paul.

The strange scientific news coming out of Florida – sink holes, giant pythons just to name two – continues with this report of another round of hatchings of giant mosquitoes. The bugs are the size of a quarter, 20 times the size of most mosquitoes, and pack a stinging bite. Oh, and they're resistant to most bug sprays!!!

Twin Cities weather guru Paul Douglas will be leading a panel discussion tomorrow night at the Walker Art Center on new approaches to raising public awareness on climate change. The event is tied to the opening of a new climate change-themed show called This Clement World. The free session starts at 7 p.m. at the Walker and among the panelists is Science Buzz blogger and SMM Director of Global Change Initiatives Patrick Hamilton. City Pages has an interview with Douglas about this new approach to climate change education.