Stories tagged airplane

Solar Impulse makes maiden voyage

As the sun shone down on the Swiss countryside an aircraft powered by 12,000 solar cells flew for 87 minutes to an altitude of nearly 4,000 feet. Learn more here: Wired

Maybe I've been watching "Speeders" too much on TruTV, but this item in the new caught my eye. A group of volunteer engineers are converting a jet plane into a car, if you can call it that, to try to smash the land speed record. A similar group of professionals are attempting the same thing in the U.K. Click this link to learn more, including photos and video.

Feb
25
2009

Last night, Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal criticized government spending authorized by the stimulus bill, calling particular attention to "something called volcano monitoring." Hey, $140 million is a lot of money, and what does it get us? Turns out volcano monitoring is actually kind of a big deal.

Fluffy cloud of water vapor, or engine-clogging agent of doom?: Taken from Alaska Airlines jet on July 20, 2008. This photo of Alaska's Okmok volcano was taken from 37,000 feet up, looking south from about 15 miles to the north. Scientists estimate the top of the ash cloud was at 20,000 ft.
Fluffy cloud of water vapor, or engine-clogging agent of doom?: Taken from Alaska Airlines jet on July 20, 2008. This photo of Alaska's Okmok volcano was taken from 37,000 feet up, looking south from about 15 miles to the north. Scientists estimate the top of the ash cloud was at 20,000 ft.Courtesy Phil Walgren, Alaska Volcano Observatory (USGS) and Alaska Airlines

It teaches us a lot about earth processes, of course, but some folks aren't swayed by talk of scientific advancement.

An argument for everyone is that monitoring enables authorities to plan and implement evacuations when necessary.

"The USGS has issued several warnings over the past 10 years, though predicting the timing and size of eruptions remains a difficult task.

Volcano monitoring likely saved many lives — and significant money — in the case of the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines (where the United States had military bases at the time), according to the USGS.

The cataclysmic eruption lasted more than 10 hours and sent a cloud of ash as high as 22 miles into the air that grew to more than 300 miles across.

The USGS spent less than $1.5 million monitoring the volcano and was able to warn of the impending eruption, which allowed authorities to evacuate residents, as well as aircraft and other equipment from U.S. bases there.

The USGS estimates that the efforts saved thousands of lives and prevented property losses of at least $250 million (considered a conservative figure)."

Still not convinced? Here's another benefit: volcano monitoring keeps our air routes safer, too. See, a pilot can't easily tell the difference between an ash cloud and a regular cloud. But ash clouds can damage flight control systems and kill jet engines. Don't think that's really a big problem? Some 10,000 passengers and millions of dollars' worth of cargo are ferried by US aircraft over the North Pacific every day, and there are 100 potentially dangerous volcanoes under those air routes.

Suddenly "volcano monitoring" doesn't seem like a goofy piece of esoteric research...

Find out the latest shenanigans of a deer and a monkey.

Things keep getting crazier in the airlline industry these days. I saw the headline of this news item thinking it was about "sounds" of ticks on an airplane. But no, it was grounded due to a different kind of tick. Click and read to learn more.

Jun
06
2008

A B-2 Spirit: Not exploding, which--I think--is what it's supposed to do.
A B-2 Spirit: Not exploding, which--I think--is what it's supposed to do.Courtesy U.S. Air Force
Yeah, I'm not that interested in seeing it either.

But if you're super bored, check out this video of a 1.4 billion dollar B-2 stealth bomber crashing and burning. The pilots, you'll notice, got out on time (in awesome ejection seats, by the way).

It crashed in February, but the video and explanation just came out:
"Water distorted preflight readings in three of the plane's 24 sensors, making the aircraft's control computer force the B-2 to pitch up on takeoff, resulting in a stall and subsequent crash."

I'm pretty sure that means a robot crashed the plane.

I wonder if there was ever a movie made about this? Just kidding--I know there was a movie made about this.

Ever mess around with model rockets, you know those temermental things that never would ignite when you pushed the launch button, and when they finally did (usually when you weren't expecting it) they'd find their way into the closest tree or flat-roofed structure? Here's a tale of one heck of a model rocket launch. Get the kid who made it signed up to work for NASA right now.