Stories tagged science friday

Aug
13
2010
It's Friday, so it's time for a new Science Friday video. Science Friday
Science Friday
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Today:
"Plants have a reputation for staying put. But some plants are moving so quickly, we can't see their motions. Biologist Joan Edwards and physicist Dwight Whitaker broke out the high-speed cameras to capture the story of exploding peat moss. The research was published in the journal Science."
It's Friday, so it's time for another Science Friday video. Science Friday
Science Friday
Courtesy Science Friday
NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), launched in February, has started to send back data. The instruments are giving solar scientists an unprecedented look at the sun, says Dean Pesnell, SDO project scientist. The hope is to better understand how solar activity--solar flares, coronal mass ejections, coronal holes--is linked to the sun's magnetic field.
It's Friday, so it's time for a new Science Friday video. Science Friday
Science Friday
Courtesy Science Friday
"Need a new perspective on life? Try launching a video camera 50 feet in the air. This DIY sky-cam is one of many experiments outlined in Ken Denmead's new book Geek Dad: Awesomely Geeky Projects and Activities for Dads and Kids to Share.
It's Friday, so it's time for another Science Friday video. Science Friday
Science Friday
Courtesy Science Friday
"Engineer James Bird estimates that he watched thousands of bubbles pop while he was getting his Ph.D. at Harvard University. With the help of high-speed cameras, Bird and his colleagues discovered that when interfacial bubbles--bubbles resting on water or a solid--pop, they give birth to a ring of baby bubbles. The discovery, published in Nature, has implications for soda drinkers and global climate estimates."
It's Friday, so it's time for a new Science Friday video. Science Friday
Science Friday
Courtesy Science Friday
"Lightning is one of the biggest unsolved mysteries of the atmospheric sciences, researchers say. Scientists at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing in Florida are inducing lightning to strike so they can understand it better. Though summer doesn't begin officially for a few weeks, one of the signature marks of summer may already be in the air near you -- the evening thunderstorm. Thousands of lightning strikes occur on the planet every minute, but the summer heat and humidity help to ramp up the number of lightning-producing thunderstorms. We'll talk about the science of lightning."
Learn more.
It's Friday afternoon, so it's time for another Science Friday video. Science Friday
Science Friday
Courtesy Science Friday
"They look cuddly, but don't be fooled: red-eyed treefrogs (Agalychnis callidryas) have a secret dark side. When Michael Caldwell, of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, filmed the frogs under infrared light he saw a behavior had hadn't seen before -- the frogs started vigorously shaking the branches they were sitting on. Caldwell and colleagues, including Karen Warkentin of Boston University, decode the meaning of the shakes in Current Biology this week."
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Science Friday logo
Courtesy Science Friday
It's Friday, so it's time for another Science Friday video... The honk of a horn or the rumble of a truck sounds like noise to most of us. But to Lucy Fitz Gibbon, and others with absolute pitch, there are notes embedded in that noise. Psychiatry professor David Ross, of the Yale School of Medicine, explains what's known about how people acquire this mysterious ability.

It's Friday, so it's time for a new Science Friday video.

Science Friday
Science FridayCourtesy Science Friday

How would you describe the size of a wind turbine? There's no right answer. Turbines come in different varieties tuned for different uses. Compare the 256-foot-tall Gamesa G87 turbines, found at Bear Creek Wind Park in Penn., with the mini turbines developed by Bergey Windpower in Norman, Okla. The scale of both may surprise you.

Mar
12
2010

Science Friday logo
Science Friday logo
Courtesy Science Friday
It's Friday, so it's time for a new Science Friday video. This week,

"What is the future of sustainable architecture? Washington University's Tyson Living Learning Center in Eureka, MO, achieves the Living Building Challenge--a set of green guidelines that measure a building based on its performance. The building's architect Dan Hellmuth, of Hellmuth & Bicknese Architects in St. Louis, and Kevin Smith, associate director of Tyson Research Center, point out some of the Center's greenest features."