Stories tagged stradivarius

Feb
07
2009

Stradivarious secret is in the sauce
Stradivarious secret is in the sauceCourtesy caribb

Stradivarius violins soaked in "secret sauce"

Having obtained minute wood samples from restorers working on Stradivarius and Guarneri instruments, scientists now have verified that the wood was treated with borax, fluorides, chromium and iron salts. Borax is a wood preservative and an insecticide. It makes sense that wood craftsmen would want to protect their creations from being chewed up by worms.

Joseph Nagyvary, a professor emeritus of biochemistry, first theorized in 1976 that chemicals used on the instruments – not merely the wood and the construction – are responsible for the distinctive sound of these violins." Texas A&M University

Joseph Nagyvary, a professor emeritus of biochemistry, along with Renald Guillemette, director of the electron microprobe laboratory, and Clifford Spiegelman, professor of statistics, all Texas A&M faculty members published their research in the current issue of the scientific journal Public Library of Science (PloSONE).

Learn more about Nagyvary's research

Source: "Secrets Of Stradivarius’ Unique Sound Revealed"
Nagyvary's website: Nagyvary Violins

Apr
15
2006


Can today's technology recreate the time-honored craftsmanship of a Strativarius violin? Researchers are tyring to find out.
What makes a Stradivarius violin sing so sweetly?

A couple of Swedish researchers are hoping to figure that out using some advanced mathematical formulas with a goal of eventually being able to make duplicates of the treasured musical instruments. They’re beginning a two-year study of the famous instruments using computer models and high-end math.

But can technology figure out how to duplicate old-time craftsmanship? Many musicians believe that the old instruments have their unique sound because their wood has aged since they were made nearly 300 years ago. Their unique sound may also have something to do with the stains and finishes from that time that were applied to the wood.

About 600 Stradivarius violins remain out of the more than 1,100 originals. And they’re known for more than just their sound quality. They can fetch some pretty high price tags. Last year, one sold for just over $2 million at an auction in New York City, the most money every paid for a musical instrument.

What do you think? Is this a good way to apply technology of the 21st Century?