Stories tagged wolf

Aug
06
2008

I'm Denali: Wolf pup Denali cools off with a swim in the International Wolf Center's pond.
I'm Denali: Wolf pup Denali cools off with a swim in the International Wolf Center's pond.Courtesy International Wolf Center Staff
This week marked the formal introduction of the International Wolf Center’s two newest inhabitants: wolf pups Aidan and Denali. The pups, who were born at the Wildlife Science Center in Forest Lake in April and were transferred to Ely’s International Wolf Center in May, were integrated into the center’s resident wolf pack on Monday.

Aidan and Denali were each a shade under four pounds at the time of their birth. In the three months since, they’ve grown into the ballpark of being around 40 pounds.

What exactly do wolf pups do to have fun? Here are some links to cool video of Aidan and Denali going about daily life at the center:

I'm Aiden: Wolf pup Aiden, flanked by adult wolf Maya, checks out the view of his new home from on top of the wolf den entrance.
I'm Aiden: Wolf pup Aiden, flanked by adult wolf Maya, checks out the view of his new home from on top of the wolf den entrance.Courtesy Awen Briem, International Wolf Center
Denali digging

Denali being coaxed out of the den

Aidan being submissive and being checked out by adults

Aidan hunting for something in a tub of water

Denali and Aidan wrestling

Now that they’re with the resident pack, they’re showing more common wolf behaviors, including jaw sparring, tug of war, food possession (caching), and squashes, a behavior identified by one pup laying on top of the other pup to gain possessions or for dominance. Aidan has shown considerable interest in the exhibit pack in recent days.

The introductions actually went pretty smoothly, taking only about 45 minutes. Wolf Center personnel report that most wolf packs are very caring towards wolf pups, sharing feeding and pup-sitting duties and indulging in play.

"Visitors and media are invited to watch the fascinating transformation of Aidan and Denali from pups to predators and to observe the pack members' uncertain social relationships unfold over the next several months," says Lori Schmidt, curator of the center. Visitors can travel to the center in Ely or watch wolf cam, video and photo updates on the center’s website.

Here's a report of a metro man facing a prison sentence after shooting a wolf in northern Minnesota while the animals were still catagorized as an endangered species.

Visitors to the Science Museum of Minnesota's Mississippi River Gallery haven't had the usual rite of spring of seeing peregrine falcon chicks on gallery's television monitor. Bummer, right? But here's the good news. In a few months they'll be able to see two wolf pups. With no nesting falcons available on television cameras this spring, the gallery's television monitor has been tuned into the International Wolf Center in Ely. The center has just received two wolf pups. Those pups will go on public display when they grow to about 35 pounds, which should be in August. The pups are growing about a half pound a day.