Stories tagged coffee

Jan
16
2009

A day in the life: That the dog is on the table isn't strange—I put it there—but what it had to say was extremely odd.
A day in the life: That the dog is on the table isn't strange—I put it there—but what it had to say was extremely odd.Courtesy oh estelle
I suppose that if you haven’t seen this already, y’all have at least imagined that you saw it: it turns out that regular coffee drinkers are three times more likely to experience hallucinations.

That’s right, a new study says that people who consume the amount of caffeine in three cups of brewed coffee (or seven cups of instant) have triple the risk of experiencing visual or auditory hallucinations

While it’s not totally clear whether the increased stress from the caffeine induces hallucinations, or if people who hallucinate are more stressed in the first place (and crave caffeine), it’s a concerning discovery for me. I already hallucinate heavily.

Mostly my hallucinations are auditory (the dog has had a lot to say recently, none of it interesting), though some are what I like to think of as “emotional hallucinations” (see, my pen hates me, but that’s okay, because my tape dispenser loooves me). Both types can be inconvenient, and so it’s fortunate that I’m not a coffee drinker.

However, there’s also this recent research: drinking a moderate amount of coffee lowers the risk of developing dementia or Alzheimer’s disease later in life by as much as 65%. A “moderate amount” of coffee is defined here, coincidentally, as about three cups a day.

So what’s a boy to do? If my risk for hallucinations is already at about 300% above normal, will coffee’s risk just add to that? Or will it compound? On one hand, I don’t want to be hallucinating that the dog is talking to me and forget what he had to say. On the other hand, I don’t want to spend my twilight years in a state of constant, violent hallucination—I want to while away my final years shoplifting and complaining about the youth (hallucinating no more than is absolutely necessary).

What do y’all think? Am I alone here? Or do I just have to discuss this with the dog?

Earlier we discussed the health-giving benefits of red wine. Now, new research is showing that chocolate may prevent colon cancer, while coffee drinkers live longer.

An apple a day keeps the doctor away, but a cup of coffee may help, too. Researchers have found that caffeine blocks the damage that cholesterol does to the body, and may lower the risk of Alzheimer's and dementia.

Mar
22
2007

UPDATE - The original picture posted in this entry was not a civet, see the comments below for some updated information.
New coffee maker: The civet cats of southeast Asia are credited with being able to create the most expensive coffee beans in the world. It is said that tTey eat choice, ripe beans, partially digest them and then eliminate the remains. Workers than collect the beans from th
New coffee maker: The civet cats of southeast Asia are credited with being able to create the most expensive coffee beans in the world. It is said that tTey eat choice, ripe beans, partially digest them and then eliminate the remains. Workers than collect the beans from th

Do you have expensive tastes for coffee? How about buying beans that cost $150 a pound for your morning cup of Joe.

If you’re willing to pay that much for the beans, you might not want to know how they’re processed. The Civets in southeast Asia play an important part of the process.

The small cats eat the coffee beans, partly digest them and then, ahem, eliminate them with all of their other solid wastes. They have exquisite taste and eat only the finest, ripest coffee beans they can find.

Workers collect the partially digested beans, wash away the residual dung and process the remaining coffee beans for sale to the public. Asian coffee shops say that their customers find the uniquely processed coffee to be excellent.

Some skeptics think it’s just an urban legend and a high-profile hoax to crank up prices on those gullible enough to be willing to pay huge money for exotic coffee. But coffee marketers from the East insist it’s a legitmate, and safe, way to get coffee.

What do you think? Would you be willing to drink some civet pre-processed coffee?

Adding yet another piece of evidence to the modern debate, the NY Times reports on some science that shows that coffee's positive side. There is one annoying point about this article though. The author regularly refers to a "cup of coffee." How much is that? 12oz? A travel mug full? 5oz.? Need some unit here folks.