Stories tagged folding

Folded Rock North of Loch Melfort in Scotland
Folded Rock North of Loch Melfort in ScotlandCourtesy Anne Burgess

A rock mass visible at the surface is named an "outcrop" by geologists. Most of these outcrops are made of a single, homogenous kind of rock (e.g. basalt) but in many cases rocks are layered, fractured, cleaved, or show more complicated patterns on their surface. At high temperatures and pressures inside the earth, rocks can move slowly, or can fracture creating fault planes. Outcropedia is a website meant to show a collection of such outcrops.

Outcropedia is the brainchild of three structural geologists : Cees Passchier, Mark Jessell, and Hermann Lebit. It uses a GoogleEarth template, and by clicking on a datapoint, you can see a photograph or drawing with explanatory text. Many of the outcrops included are in remote areas of planet Earth. Outcropedia welcomes new submissions, so if you have an image of an outcrop, submit it for addition!

Sep
05
2008

Were you a fan of the Mentos and Diet Coke fountains that EepyBird created? If so, you might tune in to "Samurai Girl" tonight (7pm, ABC) to see EepyBird's experiments with more than 250,000 sticky notes. You can also check out an extended version of the video, complete with how-tos, at EepyBird.com.

Here's a sneak peek, but definitely check the EepyBird site tonight for more.

Origami and science
Origami and science
We've blogged about the new science TV show, Wired Science here before. They covered lots of interesting angles for their first show last night. Both me and a friend were most intrigued by Robert Lang's work, mixing the art of origami with science problems. He looks at how computers mixed with the art of origami can help figure out how to pack airbags and even space telescopes more efficiently. I'm a bit of an origami nut but then I am a science nerd also, so you can see why I found his site pretty fun.

We've been thinking about different ways that the resurgent craft movement has links to science (trust me there are tons). So while doing some origami this weekend I was psyched to find this cool math resource on how to fold a square into thirds, fifths, and all those other hard to eyeball fractions.