Stories tagged hockey

The NCAA Frozen Four hockey championships are coming to St. Paul this weekend. And here's a chance to win a field trip to the Science Museum of Minnesota and to be part of the Friday Night at the Frozen Four festivities. Make a two-minute video on some aspect of the science involved in the sport of hockey. Learn more by watching this video.

Apr
01
2011

Where's the puck?: There will be no more worries for hockey fans in the stands about losing sight of the hockey puck when using the new iPuck app.
Where's the puck?: There will be no more worries for hockey fans in the stands about losing sight of the hockey puck when using the new iPuck app.Courtesy Nicholas Moreau
Just in time for the start of the National Hockey League (NHL) playoffs, the NHL has announced it is partnering with California-based Satellite Solutions, Inc., to offer hockey fans a new and exciting way to watch games.

“Starting this week, hockey fans will be able to download iPuck,” said NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman. “Using global positioning system technology along with a special chip embedded in the puck, fans using iPuck on their phone or other mobile device will be alerted to a goal-scoring opportunity before the player even fires a shot on goal.

“With the speed and intensity of our sport, we realize that it’s not uncommon for fans to miss that split second when a shot is fired and a goal is scored,” the commissioner said. “iPuck is sort of like a smoke detector, alerting you that a goal chance is present just before it happens.”

How does this actually work?

The electronic chips embedded into the puck and the goal posts emit a signal that is picked up and triangulated through GPS systems. In milliseconds, that system calculates the angle that the puck is being directed and if there is potential for a shot to be on net.

“In effect, fans have about a third of a second advance warning that a goal might be scored and the chance to focus their attention on the net,” Bettmen said. “One of the biggest complaints we get about our game is that fans too often miss the rare goals that are scored.”

Currently, iPuck only works for spectators present at games at the arena, but within the next couple weeks, iPuck TV should also be available for use by fans watching games on television or through a satellite feed to their iPad or iPhone.

Today, Friday, April 1, is the first day downloads of iPuck are available on iTunes. The app sells for $4.99.

Says Don Rickles: "Do you really believe this crap you hockey puck!!!!"
Says Don Rickles: "Do you really believe this crap you hockey puck!!!!"Courtesy Wikipedia
Fans will have their first opportunity to try out iPuck at Saturday’s Tampa Bay Lightning/Minnesota Wild game at Excel Energy Center. To commemorate the historic occasion, comedian and noted hockey puck fan Don Rickles will drop the ceremonial first puck.

“I am so glad to be associated with taking hockey pucks to this next level,” Rickles said. “And to realize that so many people are reading this item posted on April Fool’s Day and believe that this could really happen. What a bunch of hockey pucks.”

If iPuck is successful, the NHL has plans to develop iFight, which would embed the same technology into the gloves of notorious hockey fighters, alerting fans when those players are loosening their gloves and getting ready to punch out a hated foe.

Jan
30
2007

New uniform: Sidney Crosby of the Pittsburg Penguins models one of the new uniforms used at last week's NHL all-star game. Scientific research went into the designs with hopes of speeding up the game.
New uniform: Sidney Crosby of the Pittsburg Penguins models one of the new uniforms used at last week's NHL all-star game. Scientific research went into the designs with hopes of speeding up the game.
Did you watch last week’s NHL all-star game? Neither did I. But the game featured players wearing new uniforms that have been scientifically designed in hopes of speeding up the game. From the highlights I saw, they don’t look a whole lot different than traditional hockey uniforms, but the looks might be deceiving.

Next year, all NHL hockey teams will be wearing the new style of uniforms which the league and Reebok have been working on for years. Researchers from MIT were part of the design group, conducting wind tunnel testing on the new uniforms which show they will have 9 percent less drag in the air as players skate down the ice.

Through the use of new fabrics, the new uniforms should be 14 percent lighter when games start and 25 percent lighter when games end? How can that happen, you ask? With the old sweater type uniforms, players’ sweat was absorbed by the jersey and gained a lot of “water weight” through the course of the game. New fabrics in the uniforms will repel more moisture, cutting down that weight gain through the game.

Designers also figure that the new uniforms will be 10 percent cooler for players. And unlike the NBA, which this season tried to introduce a new basketball but ultimately went back to the old ball due to player complaints, the new jerseys are heartily endorsed by NHL players. They’ve been involved in the design process through the start.

There are other percentages NHL teams and players may be keeping their eyes on when the new uniforms debut next year. That’s the percentage increase in jersey sales at sports shops with the new duds. Many teams will likely be redesigning their color schemes and logos with the switch to the new fabrics.