Stories tagged life extension

Nov
13
2008

For countless centuries, people have attempted to become immortal. Now, we are ever closer to this ancient goal. This is not just like the progress in raising life expectancy that has been continuing since the Industrial Revolution. It is extending the lifespan beyond what is naturally possible, about 120 years (see http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/4003063.stm , from 2004, but still relevant). New medical discoveries and technologies that are leading us to this goal are being developed faster than ever. (http://www.physorg.com/news143392265.html)
Many methods using modern science have been proposed to make people live unnaturally long. Those include genetic engineering, adding physical enhancements which will basically make people cyborgs, cryogenics, and uploading a person's mind onto a computer and abandoning the human body altogether. For now, at least, this is basically science fiction, but the goal is coming closer to realization. Many researchers are working on the scientific problem, and bioethicists are arguing over whether it is actually desirable.
Arguments in support of life extension basically revolve around the fact that they believe death is avoidable and thus is an unnecessary tragedy (see http://www.nickbostrom.com/fable/dragon.html for an explanation of this view in allegory form). Opponents of artificial life extension argue that it would cause overpopulation, drain the world's resources, and very likely be impossible or improbable in the foreseeable future (see http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/4059549.stm). Many private foundations fund research into life extension currently. While this does not seem to be a pressing issue right now, in the future it will come more into the spotlight, along with other speculative technologies such as artificial intelligence and space colonization. What do you think about life extension?
Source:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life_extension
See the links on the Wikipedia page.

Researchers have created a mutant mouse that lives 30 per cent longer despite eating more and weighing less — all thanks to the loss of a single protein called type 5 adenylyl cyclase (AC5). [email protected]

Mar
14
2005

As the Pioneer Press reports (and as was noted here earlier), life expectancy in the US continues to rise. The average American can now expect to live 77.6 years.

But how far can we push it? 100 years? 120? The Sunday Times of London offers a survey of current research and suggests that, at the rate medical science is advancing, it's possible that some children alive today may live a thousand years or more!