Stories tagged movies

Nov
04
2011

Another Experimonth I am working on is "My how you have grown". I started out by posting a recent picture of me:
Recent Photo of Myself: Here is a picture of me on Halloween 2011.  Obviously I was Freddy Krueger :)
Recent Photo of Myself: Here is a picture of me on Halloween 2011. Obviously I was Freddy Krueger :)Courtesy My Husband

From there the converstation went into Horror Movies, favorites, and what we like about them. I mentioned that I like being scared and that adrenaline rush you get from the suspense. I didn't put any thought into why until I received this comment:

"Kiki, do you think your "need for scary/adrenaline rushes" is a result of genetics or your environment growing up?"

My head started spinning!! I needed to respond right away because I never thought about the things I do now being a reflection of either genetics or my environment. So, I responded immediately. This is what I wrote:

"ooohhh, good question!! Most "people" would say it probably stems from my parents divorce when I was 10. Until I left for college,I had to deal with my parents crazy relationships (my parents got along with each other fine, it was their boyfriends/girlfriends that was crazy). I guess I really never had "normal" growing up, so I like horror/suspense movies because they aren't "normal".
I love goofy/raunchy comedies as well, but NOT romantic comedies (unless the couple does NOT end up together). I find romantic comedies fake (yeah, i know, a pot calling the kettle black)....I get so mad when they end up together in the end because in the real world, that isn't how it works. It frustrates me and I actually get angry at the movie!! Blue Valentine was good because (spoiler alert!) they didn't end up together.
So there is my environmental factor in a nutshell....however, I do believe that there is genetics involved as well. My mom loves Dean Koontz (horror/suspense novelist) and my dad loves crime books. I am the only one in the family though that takes it to an extreme, but that is the way I am, no gray area, all black and white.
A psychologist would love this right now. haha
That was all just a quick blurb off the top of my head, however, that question was really good and i will be thinking about this for awhile!!"

Now, like I said, this is all off the top of my head and I really want to spend more time thinking about this as I find it extremely interesting. So, the reason for my blog isn't just to share my thoughts, but also get thoughts from others on either my response above or what they think about genetic vs environmental factors playing a role in their current life.

Jul
10
2008

Would you still love Nessie if it looked like this?: Don't lie to me. I know when you're lying to me.
Would you still love Nessie if it looked like this?: Don't lie to me. I know when you're lying to me.Courtesy cramsay23
Our sly creature pal, the Loch Ness Monster, is back flaunting his hot stuff on tape.

A couple of Huddersfield holidaymakers (“holidaymakers” being British for “dangerous social deviants”) claim to have captured the image of Nessie on their vaca video (“vaca” is American for “debauchery near water.” I think it’s also Spanish for “cow.”)

Fearing institutional commitment (think “Oliver Twist” without the songs—so, like, Oliver Twist the book), the British challengers of the unknown kept mum about their discovery for several weeks, until an important decision was made while drinking: let the world know.

The video was apparently assisted in its journey to the public eye by Sony Pictures Entertainment, a well know scientific institution. Coincidentally, SPE was in the neighborhood (of Scotland) intending to stage a projection of Nessie for the release of its new DVD Waterhorse: The Legend of Horsewater.

One wonders to what extent Sony went to kick up some exciting videos.

Anyway, I hope this is encouraging news for everyone. Pack your video cameras and harpoon guns, because I hear Scotland is beautiful this time of year.

Oh, right. Here’s the video.

Jun
16
2008

Silent and sinister, they sneak up and attack when you least expect. It's ... the TREES!: Wait a minute…didn’t I see this same plot in Day of the Triffids?
Silent and sinister, they sneak up and attack when you least expect. It's ... the TREES!: Wait a minute…didn’t I see this same plot in Day of the Triffids?Courtesy sjarvinen

OK, so I, like, never go to movies. Nine bucks for the pleasure of driving for miles, sticking to someone else’s timetable, buying over-priced popcorn, sitting through previews, and crowding into a dark, poorly-ventilated fire trap with a bunch of loud strangers? I fail to see the appeal. Unless the movie features a truly spectacular acting talent, such as Scarlett Johansson or Jennifer Aniston. Then I’m all over it. Otherwise, I’ll just wait for the DVD.

And that goes double for science fiction. Is there a more useless genre? Science is fascinating precisely because it’s true. I walk into a sci-fi flick, and within five minutes I can actually feel myself, everyone around me, and the entire Universe, getting dumber.

(I may be the only person in America who has never seen even one of the Star Wars films, and have not even the slightest desire to ever do so. If that makes me a better person than everyone else, I can live with that.)

Well, apparently there’s this film out now called The Happening, in which trees decide to rebel against mankind by emitting poison gas or something. I probably should have said “Spoiler Alert” up there, but, seriously, I’m doing you a favor by discouraging you from wasting your money on this dreck.

Anyway, a bunch of scientists with a selfless love of humanity and far stronger stomachs than I have viewed this alleged “film” and reported back on five major scientific flaws, which, with any luck, will spoil the film for everyone for all time.

To which the critical mind responds: "Only five?"

Meanwhile, the magazine The New Republic ignores the science and looks at the moral world of the movie and declares it the most reprehensible film they’ve ever seen.

Though Zooey Deschanel is kinda cute…

Popular Mechanics has put together a list of 10 movies that made some accurate predictions about the future – including Gattaca, which foresaw some of the bioethics questions we grapple with in the exhibit Deadly Medicine.

Shocking, I know. But the new movie, I Am Legend, based on the book The Omega Man, of the same name [see comments], contains a number of elements that are scientifically dubious at best, if not outright impossible. Popular Mechanics has the run down.

Here at the Science Museum of Minnesota we just finished working on a exhibit about the science of fear called Goosebumps. On the exhibit website there is an interesting poll where you can vote for the scariest movie ever. I picked the Shining from their list what would you pick?