Stories tagged pandemic

May
03
2009

Pigs get flu from humans
Pigs get flu from humansCourtesy teresia

Canadian human infects pigs with "swine flu"

"A worker at (a Canadian) farm had traveled to Mexico, fallen ill there and unknowingly brought the disease back to Canada last month. The worker has recovered.

About 10 percent of the 2,200 pigs on the farm got sick. According to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, all recovered without treatment in five days.

The entire herd remains under quarantine as a precaution. New York Times"

Learn more
For additional information read this Wall Street Journal post titled,
Pigs in Canada Contract Flu Virus

Apr
30
2009

Department of Health and Human Services
Department of Health and Human ServicesCourtesy Department of Health and Human Services

H1N1 Flu information

If you want valid information about Influenza A(H1N1), You should first check out the official disease control websites.

Here are some of the official web pages of our national and world leadership for information about fighting disease.

Also embeded is a webcast where public questions about the 2009 flu pandemic are answered by Acting Director of CDC, Dr. Besser.

Use the links below for official information about Influenza A(H1N1)

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  2. PandemicFlu.gov
  3. CDC H1N1 flu information
  4. H1N1 Flu questions & answers
  5. World Health Organization info

President Obama's flu message

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Watch a webcast answering questions about the 2009 flu pandemic

Apr
30
2009

Is this the face of a pandemic threat?
Is this the face of a pandemic threat?Courtesy The Pug Father
No need to put down your pork chops, as health officials are quick to remind us: you can't get swine flu from eating products made from pigs. In fact, health officials have yet to find a pig with this particular strain of the virus. According to the CDC, the virus that's been making headlines this week contains not only pig, but also human and bird flu DNA. Viruses are complicated and mutate as they go from one host to the next, so it's difficult to tell just where novel strains originate. All of this has left many people to question whether it's appropriate to call the virus "swine flu" at all?

Pork producers say: leave pigs out of this!

They're afraid that the name "swine flu" will cause demand for their products to plummet, and have asked government officials and the news media to call the virus by it's scientific name, H1N1, which refers to the serotype of the virus - its particular chemical make-up. It's a rational fear on their part. Some countries have already banned meat and pork products from Mexico and parts of the US due to fear over the spread of the disease.

What do you think? Would a flu by any other name...smell like meat? When it comes to novel viruses like this one, what's in a name?

Apr
26
2009

Pandemic prevention in Mexico City
Pandemic prevention in Mexico CityCourtesy Chupacabras

No mass at Cathedral of Mexico City Sunday

In addition to churches, Mexico closed schools, museums, libraries and theaters, hoping to contain the outbreak of a swine flu variety that is killing people. Officials say as many as 81 people have died and more than 1,300 others are sickened from a new type of flu.

The virus contains genetic pieces from four different flu viruses; North American swine influenza, North American avian influenza, human influenza A N1H1, and swine influenza viruses found in Asia and Europe.

Swine flu symptoms

Symptoms of the flu-like illness include a fever of more than 100 degrees Fahrenheit (37.8 degrees Celsius), body aches, coughing, a sore throat, respiratory congestion and, in some cases, vomiting and diarrhea. Click this link for more key facts about swine influenza (swine flu).

Global swine flu alert

China, Russia and Taiwan plan to put anyone with symptoms of the deadly virus under quarantine. Ten students from New Zealand who took a school trip to Mexico "likely" caught this swine flu. Four possible cases of swine flu are currently under investigation in France. More than 100 students at the St. Francis Preparatory School, in Queens, New York recently began suffering a fever, sore throat and aches and pains. Some of them had recently been in Mexico.

"The United States government is working with the World Health Organization and other international partners to assure early detection and warning and to respond as rapidly as possible to this threat," Dr. Richard Besser, acting director of the CDC, said during a Friday afternoon press briefing.

How to track illnesses globally

There are several useful online resources that track health information and disease outbreaks.

  1. The World Health Organization (WHO) has an Epidemic and Pandemic Alert and Response (EPR) webpage.

    As of 26 April 2009, the United States Government has reported 20 laboratory confirmed human cases of swine influenza A/H1N1 (8 in New York, 7 in California, 2 in Texas, 2 in Kansas and 1 in Ohio).

  2. HealthMap is a website that aggregates news feeds from the WHO, Google News, ProMED, and elsewhere to map out all of the disease outbreaks. (Click the box in front of influenza under "Diseases, last 30 days" to see just flu cases.)

What is a pandemic?

The WHO's pandemic alert level is currently up to phase 3. The organization said the level could be raised to phase 4 if the virus shows sustained ability to pass from human to human. Phase 5 would be reached if the virus is found in at least two countries in the same region.

"The declaration of phase 5 is a strong signal that a pandemic is imminent and that the time to finalize the organization, communication, and implementation of the planned mitigation measures is short," WHO said. Associated Press

Phase 6 would indicate a full-scale global pandemic.

Sources:

Jan
18
2009

Bird flu rears its head again in China

Bird flu death in China
Bird flu death in ChinaCourtesy broterham
A two year old girl in northern China has tested positive for bird flu. Early this month, January 5, a 19-year-old Beijing woman died of bird flu after handling poultry. She had purchased ducks at a market in Hebei Province, which neighbors Beijing. Although she had close contact with 116 people, no one around her has fallen ill.

Pandemic possibilities worry officials

Human-to-human transmission of avian flu is rare, but officials worry the virus could mutate and become a deadly pandemic. H5N1 has led to 248 deaths worldwide since 2003, including 21 in China.

Source articles:
Click this link to read all CNN articles about bird flu

May
29
2007

Blood from bird flu survivors successfully treats H5N1 virus in mice.

Treatment for H5N1
Treatment for H5N1
The antibodies worked well when administered three days after the mice were infected, with all 20 mice in the treatment groups surviving, compared with none out of five in the control group. Antibody-producing white blood cells, called memory B cells, were separated from the blood of four Vietnamese who had recovered from H5N1 influenza (bird flu). In Switzerland, Dr. Lanzavecchia treated them with a process he developed so that they rapidly and continuously produced large amounts of antibody.

Next, researchers in Dr. Subbarao's lab screened 11,000 antibody-containing samples provided by the Swiss team and found a handful able to neutralize H5N1 influenza virus. Based on these results, Dr. Lanzavecchia purified the B cells and ultimately created four monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that secrete H5N1-specific neutralizing antibodies." Science Daily

Human antibodies used in flu pandemic of 1918.

Using blood products from influenza survivors is an old idea, the researchers note. During the flu pandemic of 1918-19, for example, physicians took serum from recovered flu patients and gave it to new victims. A recent study suggests it halved the death rate, from 37% to 16%.

Antibodies are costlier and harder to mass produce.

The new antibody treatment could be used together with antivirals:

“What we are trying to do is add another arrow to the quiver of options for treating patients with H5N1 infection," says Cameron Simmons, who led the study. New Scientist

Because the survival rate was excellent even when treatment was delayed for three days, this antibody treatment would work well in treating the few people who catch the disease directly from birds, and for localized outbreaks. For large scale prevention against bird flu, antiviral drugs such as Tamiflu are the still the best defense.

Research article in PLoS Medicine: Prophylactic and Therapeutic Efficacy of Human Monoclonal Antibodies against H5N1 Influenza.