Stories tagged pest control

Dec
27
2006

Moving in: Finding it to be a very safe place to live, coyotes are moving in to cities and suburbs where they can find plenty of food but no threats from guns or predators.
Moving in: Finding it to be a very safe place to live, coyotes are moving in to cities and suburbs where they can find plenty of food but no threats from guns or predators.
Where’s the Roadrunner when you really need him?

Coyote populations have exploded in suburban areas in recent years, including in the Twin Cities. Today’s Star Tribune carried a story on the topic noting that in Eagan, south of St. Paul, there have been around 90 coyote sightings this year.

In Red Wing, down the Mississippi River from the Twin Cities, citizens grew so annoyed by the night-time howling and general nuisance of the animals there that they asked the city council to do something about it. That action was drastic. The city trapped and killed the 10 to 20 coyotes that were in that city.

The city of Chicago, one of the few urban areas to have a study done on coyote populations, figures it has around 2,000 critters roaming around.

So why are cities so attractive to coyotes?

Experts figure there’s one big reason. Coyotes lay low out in the country because they can be hunted or shot at. They have a fear of human and human surroundings because they know it’s risky territory.

Cities, however, have become sort of a coyote preserve since hunting is not allowed in urban areas. They can find food easily in the trash cans in people’s alleys or among the other smaller creatures scurrying around.

So far, there have been no documented attacks of coyotes on people in city areas. But the experts point out that has coyotes become more comfortable in their urban settings, they’ll have less and less fear of humans. While coyotes are generally shy, nocturnal animals, like any wild animal they’ll get bolder and braver over time as they learn when and where they’re safe.

So what do you think should be done about the coyote situation? Is it a problem that needs some kind of fix? Are there things we can do to coyote-proof our suburbs? Share your ideas here.