Stories tagged phenology

Twin Cities Naturalist
Twin Cities NaturalistCourtesy Twin Cities Naturalist
Check out this week's Phenology Roundup where professional naturalist Kirk Mona of Twin Cities Naturalist discusses what's been seen around the Twin Cities area in the last week. Phenology is the science of the seasons. It looks at how and when nature changes according to seasonal climatic conditions.

View a summary of phenology sightings in the Twin Cities this past week.

Twin Cities Naturalist
Twin Cities NaturalistCourtesy Twin Cities Naturalist
Check out this week's Phenology Roundup where professional naturalist Kirk Mona of Twin Cities Naturalist discusses what's been seen around the Twin Cities area in the last week. Phenology is the science of the seasons. It looks at how and when nature changes according to seasonal climatic conditions.

View a summary of phenology sightings in the Twin Cities this past week.

Twin Cities Naturalist
Twin Cities NaturalistCourtesy Twin Cities Naturalist
Check out this week's Phenology Roundup where professional naturalist Kirk Mona of Twin Cities Naturalist discusses what's been seen around the Twin Cities area in the last week. Phenology is the science of the seasons. It looks at how and when nature changes according to seasonal climatic conditions.

View a summary of phenology sightings in the Twin Cities this past week.

Twin Cities Naturalist
Twin Cities NaturalistCourtesy Twin Cities Naturalist
Check out this week's Phenology Roundup where professional naturalist Kirk Mona of Twin Cities Naturalist discusses what's been seen around the Twin Cities area in the last week. Phenology is the science of the seasons. It looks at how and when nature changes according to seasonal climatic conditions.

View a summary of phenology sightings in the Twin Cities this past week.

Twin Cities Naturalist
Twin Cities NaturalistCourtesy Twin Cities Naturalist
Check out this week's
Phenology Roundup where professional naturalist Kirk Mona of Twin Cities Naturalist discusses what's been seen around the Twin Cities area in the last week. Phenology is the science of the seasons. It looks at how and when nature changes according to seasonal climatic conditions.

View a summary of phenology sightings in the Twin Cities this past week.

The first two of Belinda's five eggs hatched early this morning. (Belinda is the resident peregrine falcon in the nest box at the King power plant in Bayport, MN.)

Chicks 1 and 2: Baby peregrines are helpless at first, and are cared for by both parents. But they grow at an astonishing rate, and should be ready to leave the nest for the first time by the end of June or the beginning of July.
Chicks 1 and 2: Baby peregrines are helpless at first, and are cared for by both parents. But they grow at an astonishing rate, and should be ready to leave the nest for the first time by the end of June or the beginning of July.Courtesy Xcel Energy/Raptor Resource Project

The other eggs, if they hatch at all, should follow in the next few days.

For more on peregrine falcons, visit our 2011 peregrine cam page.

Hatch today?

by Liza on May. 19th, 2011

Well, it's May 19, the estimated hatch date for the peregrine falcon chicks in the nest box at the King power plant in Bayport. Haven't seen any chicks yet, but Belinda's made a little moat of pebbles around the eggs -- the folks on the Raptor Resource forum say that's something she always does right before hatching. Stay tuned...

Disaster junkies, prepare to be disappointed.

Hydrograph: 4/11/2011, 5pm
Hydrograph: 4/11/2011, 5pmCourtesy Advanced Hydrological Prediction Service

The National Weather Service says that the Mississippi River at downtown St. Paul has crested, again, at 18.71'. (Previous crest was on 3/30 at 19.1'.)

Forecasters say that the river will remain at this level for a few days before falling at the end of the week. And they caution that the model only includes precipitation anticipated in the next 24 hours. A lot of rain in the next few days could cause the river to rise. Again.

The river level here at downtown St. Paul has been going down since the crest on 3/30 at 19.1'. We're holding now at about 17.3', and the National Weather Service predicts that the trend will bottom out tonight at around 17.2' before the river starts rising again. We're expecting a second crest at about 19.5' on the evening of 4/10, but that prediction doesn't take into account any rain we might get later on this week. Stay tuned...

I know, I know, it's not Friday. But I didn't post the Science Friday video last week. (Or the week before, for that matter, and that one's up next.)

Science Friday
Science FridayCourtesy Science Friday

This week (last week?):

"Crocuses, robins, spring peepers aren't the only creatures to signal spring. We visited the "Insect Compactor" at the American Museum of Natural History in New York to learn about which bugs to look out for as the weather warms. Keep your eyes on the willow trees--that's where early bees like to hang out."