Stories tagged scorpion

Deathstalker scorpion venom, combined with nanoscale particles of iron oxide, can slow the spread of BRAIN CANCER.

What is there not to love in that sentence? You've got scorpion venom, nano stuff, brain cancer...heck, I was hooked at the word Deathstalker.

Just so you know - the formal science way of saying the same thing is “Chlorotoxin Labeled Magnetic Nanovectors for Targeted Gene Delivery to Glioma”. You can find the article here.

Deathstalker Scorpion
Deathstalker ScorpionCourtesy Ester Inbar

Nov
24
2007

Super-size me: We're used to seeing scorpions that were much smaller than humans. But the 400 million-year-old sea scorpion claw recently found in Germany translates into eight-foot long creatures that were predators of the sea.
Super-size me: We're used to seeing scorpions that were much smaller than humans. But the 400 million-year-old sea scorpion claw recently found in Germany translates into eight-foot long creatures that were predators of the sea.Courtesy Divinorum
If it were a from a crab or lobster, the world’s finest chefs and seafood connoisseurs would be doing back flips of joy.

But the 18-inch fossilized claw found a few years ago in Germany comes from what is believed to be the largest known scorpion, a sea creature that stretched eight feet long.

British researchers this week announced their findings of this Jaekelopterus rhenaniae, which lived about 400 million years ago.

This sea scorpion is about a yard longer than any previously found sea scorpion specimens and the researchers who found it think it was likely the main water predator of its era. The size of its claws would have allowed it to capture armored fish, other early vertebrates and arthropods and even small sea scorpions. They believe they were cannibalistic, eating members of their own species.

But over time, fish species evolved with stronger hunting characteristics, including jaws with mouth-filled teeth that were more effective than the sea scorpion’s claws. To survive, the sea scorpions down sized to be quicker and easier to hide. And over time, researchers believe, they began making forays on to land to be more competitive in the food chain.

Judging from the spindly legs of smaller sea scorpions from that same era, the giants would not have been strong and sturdy enough to carry themselves on land.

More details on Jaekelopterus rhenaniae can be found here.