Stories tagged spider webs

Last week, National Geographic published some stinkin' fantastic photos of trees cocooned in spider webs. Apparently high flood waters in Pakistan caused the web-spinning critters to scurry to high, dry land -- namely these trees.

Here are some fun points from the article:

"The giant spider webs in Sindh, Pakistan, sometimes stretched from tree to tree..."

"...scientists determined that dozens of spider species were spinning the communal webs."

"The huge webs ultimately killed many of the trees they covered, perhaps by reducing the amount of sunlight reaching their leaves. But for a while, the webs also seemed to help trap more mosquitoes in the region, thereby reducing the risk of malaria..."

"While unusual, trees cocooned in spider webs are not unprecedented. Scientists have reported similar webs in other parts of the world, the tropics in particular."

Sep
04
2007

Web work: Two men look over a portion of the huge web a group of spiders have spun in a Texas state park east of Dallas. The white web is turning brown from all the mosquitoes the web has caught.
Web work: Two men look over a portion of the huge web a group of spiders have spun in a Texas state park east of Dallas. The white web is turning brown from all the mosquitoes the web has caught.
I’m a bit late on getting this on the web (pardon the pun), but have you seen what a posse of Texas spiders created last week?

There were numerous reports on this huge web that they spun along about 200 yards of trail in a state park located about 45 miles east of Dallas. Everyone thinks it’s pretty cool except mosquitoes, which get caught up in this tangled web.

"At first, it was so white it looked like fairyland," said Donna Garde, superintendent of the park to the Associated Press. "Now it's filled with so many mosquitoes that it's turned a little brown. There are times you can literally hear the screech of millions of mosquitoes caught in those webs."

Experts say that it’s a classic example of spiders working together as a team to accomplish a huge task. We tend to think of spiders as solitary creatures, but they can work together, as this huge web shows. Exactly how they communicate and organize their activities is still to be determined.

Entomologists from around the country were anxious to get samples of the web to determine what types of spiders created this huge network. Unfortunately, winds and rain are taking a toll on the web and it’s already starting to deteriorate.

So whenever Spider-Man starts getting too high on himself, just tell him to checkout the work of these Texas spiders to bring him back down to Earth.