Stories tagged video

Nov
04
2010

Disease Detectives
Disease DetectivesCourtesy Disease Detectives
Earlier this year I got the chance to work as the crew of high school staff in the Kitty Andersen Youth Science Center (http://www.smm.org/kaysc/) at the museum to create a series of web-based videos about infectious diseases for the Disease Detectives exhibit. We worked from January through August learning video production skills, learning about different infectious disease topics, talking to experts and folks on the museum floor. We're just getting the videos online now, and all of our videos will be on the exhibit website soon (www.diseasedetectives.org) but I wanted to share them here as well.

For this video, titled "Got Beef? The Story Behind Antibiotics and Livestock" the crew to a slaughter house on in South St. Paul, the Minnesota Department of Health, U of M St. Paul (at 7AM to see the cows grazing), Mississippi Market Co-op, and did hours of research, prep, and post production.
Got Beef? The Story Behind Antibiotics and Livestock from Disease Detectives on Vimeo.

You can check out the video here.

It's Friday, so it's time for a new Science Friday video. Science Friday
Science Friday
Courtesy Science Friday
This week,
"Pumpkins of the Atlantic Giant variety can weigh more than 1800 pounds. For a mechanical engineer with an interest in plus-sized fruit, like Georgia Tech’s David Hu, this raises an interesting physics question: how can the pumpkin get so big without breaking?"
It's Friday, so it's time for a new Science Friday video. Science Friday
Science Friday
Courtesy Science Friday
Today,
"Evolutionary psychologist Nick Neave filmed men dancing, converted the videos into dancing avatars and asked women to rate the avatars' dancing ability. The researchers found that the highly-rated male dancers had some moves in common. (Some advice: Shake that right knee.) Tracy Inman, co-director of The Ailey School, has trained thousands of dancers and responds to the findings.

What a great way to while away a summer afternoon, sending giant bubbles wafting through the air. I like how some of the bubbles break down in stages. Very cool. Of course there is science behind how soap bubbles form which you can read here. Want to make your own giant bubbles? You could if your got yourself a Bubble Thing. I hope Science Buzz's Artifactor buys one. Last winter he posted a nifty video of bubbles freezing and bursting in sub-zero temperatures, and I'd like to see him do the same thing next winter with giant bubbles.

Aug
13
2010
It's Friday, so it's time for a new Science Friday video. Science Friday
Science Friday
Courtesy Science Friday
Today:
"Plants have a reputation for staying put. But some plants are moving so quickly, we can't see their motions. Biologist Joan Edwards and physicist Dwight Whitaker broke out the high-speed cameras to capture the story of exploding peat moss. The research was published in the journal Science."
It's Friday, so it's time for another Science Friday video. Science Friday
Science Friday
Courtesy Science Friday
NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), launched in February, has started to send back data. The instruments are giving solar scientists an unprecedented look at the sun, says Dean Pesnell, SDO project scientist. The hope is to better understand how solar activity--solar flares, coronal mass ejections, coronal holes--is linked to the sun's magnetic field.
It's Friday, so it's time for a new Science Friday video. Science Friday
Science Friday
Courtesy Science Friday
"Need a new perspective on life? Try launching a video camera 50 feet in the air. This DIY sky-cam is one of many experiments outlined in Ken Denmead's new book Geek Dad: Awesomely Geeky Projects and Activities for Dads and Kids to Share.
It's Friday, so it's time for a new Science Friday video. Science Friday
Science Friday
Courtesy Science Friday
"Lightning is one of the biggest unsolved mysteries of the atmospheric sciences, researchers say. Scientists at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing in Florida are inducing lightning to strike so they can understand it better. Though summer doesn't begin officially for a few weeks, one of the signature marks of summer may already be in the air near you -- the evening thunderstorm. Thousands of lightning strikes occur on the planet every minute, but the summer heat and humidity help to ramp up the number of lightning-producing thunderstorms. We'll talk about the science of lightning."
Learn more.
It's Friday afternoon, so it's time for another Science Friday video. Science Friday
Science Friday
Courtesy Science Friday
"They look cuddly, but don't be fooled: red-eyed treefrogs (Agalychnis callidryas) have a secret dark side. When Michael Caldwell, of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, filmed the frogs under infrared light he saw a behavior had hadn't seen before -- the frogs started vigorously shaking the branches they were sitting on. Caldwell and colleagues, including Karen Warkentin of Boston University, decode the meaning of the shakes in Current Biology this week."

Massachusetts Representative Edward J. Markey, chairman of the Energy and Commerce Committee, requested that BP make its real-time camera feed of the Gulf of Mexico oil spill available to the public. And BP did. In theory, you can watch video of the oil spill on the Energy and Commerce Committee's website. But too many people wanted to see it--I sure did!--and ECC's servers are down.

There's a link to the feed on the NYTimes' Green blog, if you want to check back later.

UPDATE: the video feed is available again, although servers are still crashing intermittently. (5/21 a.m.)

Oil gushing from the ruined BP oil well: The siphon that BP placed last week is collecting about 5,000 barrels of oil each day, but you can see the oil that escapes the tube--this calls into question the official estimate of just how much oil is spilling.
Oil gushing from the ruined BP oil well: The siphon that BP placed last week is collecting about 5,000 barrels of oil each day, but you can see the oil that escapes the tube--this calls into question the official estimate of just how much oil is spilling.Courtesy BP video feed/the Select Committee on Energy Independence and Global Warming