Stories tagged volcano eruptions

Apr
16
2008

Nevado del Huila: Huila, the highest active volcano in Colombia, is a stratovolcano constructed inside an old caldera. The volcano is seen here from the SW.
Nevado del Huila: Huila, the highest active volcano in Colombia, is a stratovolcano constructed inside an old caldera. The volcano is seen here from the SW.Courtesy Juan Carlos Diago, 1995 (Bernardo Pulgarín, INGEOMINAS, Colombia).
Nevado del Huila, a volcano in Columbia, erupted shortly before midnight on Monday forcing about 3,500 people to evacuate. The eruption was preceded by seismic activity that started on April 8.

Nevado del Huila last erupted in 2007, causing flooding and mud flows (lahars) as the eruption melted the snow and ice cap on top of the tallest active volcano in Columbia.

Before this recent activity, Nevado del Huila had been quiet since the 16th century.

In 1985 25,000 people were killed when another Columbian volcano, Nevado del Ruiz, erupted initiating a series of deadly lahars.

Nov
08
2007

Yellowstone volcano of the past: A mud volcano in Norris Geyser Basin that was vigorously active in 1947, intermittently ejecting thick mud clots when surface water was scarce, but a surging gray viscous pool when surface water was more abundant, as shown here, when the pool was about 4
Yellowstone volcano of the past: A mud volcano in Norris Geyser Basin that was vigorously active in 1947, intermittently ejecting thick mud clots when surface water was scarce, but a surging gray viscous pool when surface water was more abundant, as shown here, when the pool was about 4
Just last week I had a very concerned visitor here at the museum asking about how soon the volcanic activity around Yellowstone is going to erupt again. In geologic time, it’s due to be real soon. In our human understanding time, it’s probably nothing we need to be overly concerned about.

But new data show that something is brewing up in the Yellowstone region. The volcanic crater left in Yellowstone after its last eruption has been rising in elevation about three inches a year for the last three years, report researchers from the University of Utah.

That growth could be the result of molten rock accumulating and growing underneath the crater. But researchers say there are no signs of an imminent eruption coming.

In fact, many similar volcanic craters around the world regularly rise and fall from such molten activity for decades for centuries before eruptions.

Historically, Yellowstone has been the site of huge volcanic eruptions 2 million, 1.3 million and 642,000 years ago. All of those eruptions were more devastating than the eruption of Mount St. Helens in Washington in 1980.

Of course, all of that heat and energy trapped beneath Yellowstone help to fuel the geysers that some of the key attractions of the national park that’s primarily in northwestern Wyoming.

I’ve talked with some park rangers who’ve said that the next time Yellowstone blows, we’ll notice the impacts here in Minnesota, even in a significant drop of sunlight getting through ash-filled skies. What do you think? Is a Yellowstone eruption something we need to be freaking out about?

Despite warnings by officials in Indonesia of a possible eruption soon by Mount Kelud, thousands of people living within the six-mile danger zone of the volcano are staying put.
The imminent eruption warning was issued on Tuesday following weeks of monitoring tremors and temperatures in the southeast Asia volcano.
Some villagers had evacuated at first, but are returning to their homes complaining that there isn’t enough food at the emergency shelters that were set up to handle the evacuees.
The warning is calling for people to stay at least six miles away from Mt. Kelud. It last erupted in 1990, with about a dozen people perishing. An eruption in 1919 killed about 5,000 people.
Volcano experts credit modern warning systems for helping keep the death tolls much lower, as long as people living in the affected area evacuate. Historians say that an eruption at the same volcano in the 16th century took an estimated 10,000 lives.

Researchers are converting volcanic seismic data into frequencies able to be heard by human ears. These so called “songs” assist researchers in detecting patterns that may warn of future eruptions.

Mar
09
2005

Mount St Helens—the most active volcano in North America—erupted again on Tuesday, March 8, sending a cloud of ash and steam seven miles into the air. The venting began about an hour after a 2.0 magnitude earthquake shook the east side of the volcano, which has been mostly quiet since a few eruptions last September and October.

(A major eruption in 1980 killed 57 people, destroyed 200 homes, and reduced the height of the mountain's summit from 9,677 feet to 8,364 feet.)

Mount St Helen's is one of the most studied volcanoes in the world, and sensors show that lava moving into the crater left by the 1980 eruption has pushed the lava dome within the crater up by 500 feet. Scientists don't expect a major eruption, although they say that a bigger eruption could drop ash within a 10-mile radius of the crater at any time. Recent flights over the crater haven't measured high levels of gases. Instead, researchers think the volcano will continue to grow, as it did in 1986, with a series of small eruptions and a lava-dome building phase.

Video of an ash event on February 2 here

Live volcano cam at St.Helens

St. Helens Volcano Cam Image Archive.

NASA satellite images of Mount St Helens' October "hot spots".

USGS/NASA site about using Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) technology to study the volcano.