The Kyoto Protocols

Do you think that international agreements—like the Kyoto Protocol—can make a difference in levels of greenhouse gases? Is that difference worth the estimated cost ($600 billion over the next ten years)?

Your Comments, Thoughts, Questions, Ideas

Liza's picture
Liza says:

Experts estimate that it will cost upwards of $200 billion just to rebuild New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. That's just one city, and it will all be paid for by Americans. Makes the $600 million price tag for global warming mitigation, which will be split among many countries and will benefit the whole world, seem pretty darn reasonable...

posted on Mon, 10/17/2005 - 11:37am
Gene's picture
Gene says:

Where do you get that estimate? This site puts the costs at $150 billion per year for 45 years, or nearly seven trillion dollars. This article puts the total global costs at $18 trillion.

The bottom line, though, is no one really knows how much it will cost -- which makes many people want to go slow.

posted on Sat, 11/12/2005 - 10:14pm
Joe's picture
Joe says:

I completely agree. And as a "leader" in our global community the United States should lead the way, both as an example to other nations through our policies and actions, and in financial support, especially given how much more energy we consume and waste we produce when compared to the rest of the world. Sadly, we don't do any of these things, and frankly I find that to be an embarrassment. We want to be respected by other countries yet our behavior in this area as a country is not worthy of much respect.

posted on Mon, 10/17/2005 - 5:26pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

Not if big polluters like China and India are exempt, as they are from parts of Kyoto.

posted on Mon, 10/24/2005 - 2:59pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

The game is only fun (and functional) if all the kids play! (US, China, India, etc.)

posted on Mon, 10/24/2005 - 3:00pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

what is the kyoto accord? `how does it impact the USA?

posted on Sat, 11/12/2005 - 11:12am
Gene's picture
Gene says:

Here's an interesting tidbit: according to this article in the Guardian newspaper of London, greehouse gas emissions in Britain, which has signed the Kyoto treaty, have gone up in the last two years, while emissions in the US, which has not signed, have gone down. Make of that what you will.

posted on Sat, 11/12/2005 - 10:07pm
Gene's picture
Gene says:

The Kyoto Protocol is an international treaty on greenhouse gasses. It does not affect the United States because, in 1997, the Senate voted 96-0 to not accept any treaty which did not cover developing countries as well as industrialized nations. Neither President Clinton nor President Bush have ever submitted the treaty to the Senate for ratification.

posted on Sat, 11/12/2005 - 9:59pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

Shame on President Bush and on the Congress for not demanding that he sign the Protocol. We should all be ashamed of them.

posted on Sun, 11/13/2005 - 5:23pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

Given that it's costing billions of dollars, and may not have any measurable effect, not signing actually seems like the prudent thing to do.

posted on Mon, 11/14/2005 - 2:58pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

Yes, I think it can if the U.S. would agree to it and try to change because it will help in the long run.

posted on Wed, 11/30/2005 - 12:04pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

There are much better ways to produce efficient societies. See the U.S., Australia, Japan, China environmental agreement of Summer, '05.

posted on Wed, 11/30/2005 - 12:14pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

Saving the environment is worth all the money in the world.

posted on Wed, 11/30/2005 - 12:14pm
Gene's picture
Gene says:

Here's an editorial from the Wall Street Journal arguing that because the Kyoto treaty focued on the problem, rather than the solution, it was doomed to failure, and has indeed failed. Of course, many people have other opinions. Another round of climate talks was recently concluded in Montreal.

posted on Mon, 12/12/2005 - 4:46pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

Well, will it work?

There's no point in paying for something if you don't even know if it will work yet.

posted on Tue, 12/13/2005 - 4:14pm
Kitty Kat's picture
Kitty Kat says:

really, first of all there is no proof at all that global warming caused hurricane Katrina in the first place. anyway, don't we all complain that it is to cold? so therefor, global warming would be positive. There is no scientific proof that global warming exists anyway. So about the Kyoto treaty? Why bother?

posted on Tue, 02/28/2006 - 2:06pm
Gene's picture
Gene says:

Global warming is real enough -- the Earth's temperature definitely increased from 1980 to 1998, and has not come down appreciably since. Why that happened, and what effect it will have, is a mater open to debate.

posted on Tue, 04/15/2008 - 12:06pm
Gene's picture
Gene says:

According to this story, China, which is not covered by the Kyoto treaty, is now the top producer of carbon pollution in the world.

posted on Tue, 04/15/2008 - 12:05pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I agree that we should try and stop global warming. Even if it takes a while, it is worth it.

posted on Tue, 04/15/2008 - 1:04pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

hate the fact that Global Warming is really happening. I hate what its doing to the animals, especially the Polar Bears. Iwish it would stop

posted on Tue, 04/15/2008 - 1:41pm

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