Will you be getting a flu shot this fall? Why or why not?

Total votes: 9

Your Comments, Thoughts, Questions, Ideas

Liza's picture
Liza says:

Two little kids at home (3 and 1). I wash their hands all the time, but they still come down with all sorts of viruses all the time. We don't want to get the flu on top of all the other stuff we can't help picking up!

posted on Thu, 09/21/2006 - 2:30pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

Hi, My name is Chelsie and I am the same way..My theory is that no matter how many time you wash your hands, bacteria and virus still are on your hands.. You could try to wash their hands with 99.9% bacteria and virus killer soap, but what happens to the .01% that survives. If it survives does that mean that they are the viruses that can't be killed off with the anti bacterial soap? Does that mean that they are the viruses that you need to worry about the most???

posted on Wed, 10/04/2006 - 11:25am
Liza's picture
Liza says:

Chelsie,

Bacteria and viruses live on your skin. Many of those bacteria, however, are either neutral or beneficial to you, one way or another.

At our house, we avoid antibacterial products. When we know something really needs to be disinfected, we use bleach. But when it comes to hand-washing, the best technique is a little regular soap and a lot of scrubbing. (Sing "Happy Birthday" or the ABC song to yourself while you're washing, and you'll walk away with pretty clean hands.)

You're largely immune to many of the bacteria and viruses in your own house, gross as they may be. But visitors or people with compromised immune systems might not be. So keep scrubbing!

posted on Mon, 10/09/2006 - 11:46am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

What is bleach? Bleach is Chlorine. Chlorine is an anti-bacterial substance. Further, drink a little or suck the vapors in and it can be deadly to we who are "higher organsisms." There is current research that antibacterial soaps sometimes do allow the toughest bacteria to mutate and become resistant to the antibiotic effect. Thanks.

posted on Sat, 02/03/2007 - 8:14pm
bryan kennedy's picture

Well, yes there is no way of denying it: bleach is toxic to humans. Wikipedia has a good summary of some of the yucky things that people worry about with bleach. But I have to admit I wouldn't be to excited about eating at a restaurant that didn't use bleach to clean their kitchens. It the only common cleaner I've heard of that actually is effective against E. coli and salmonella.

Well, I don't know how we wandered off on this topic when we started talking about the flu shot. I think I am going to go wash my hands.

posted on Mon, 02/05/2007 - 12:51pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

i know someone out in the world is doing this, but why don't we study it. find new ways to clean the things around us without hurting ourselfs. i know just saying that means nothing, i'm talking to a wall, but if someone really did something then something great would happen. rather vague i know but i don't know what else to say.

posted on Mon, 02/05/2007 - 4:50pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I think u should go ask a doctor or go online

posted on Thu, 11/09/2006 - 11:03am
Matthew S.'s picture
Matthew S. says:

Well I seem to have a strong immune system and if I get the flu it ussaly isn't that bad. But I haven't had it in a while so...maybe.

posted on Thu, 10/19/2006 - 7:50pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I dunno, but I keep thinking that if we get shots for everything we won't have an immune system to fight off the simple cold. Our bodies will end up NEEDING shots to get better and our bodies won't be able to fight anything off. I agree with Matthew on the fact that my flu is never that bad. I would get my child one if she was under a certain age, and if I was elderly but other than that I would have to say, I want my body to be able to fend off stuff by itself.

posted on Wed, 11/15/2006 - 1:20am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

thank you for reminding me!

posted on Mon, 11/06/2006 - 4:56pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

A very high percentage of people I know that get the flu shot actually get sick from the shot itself. The medical community calls it Malaise, but the symptoms are the same as the flu, so let's be truthful - people do get the flu from the flu shot.

posted on Sun, 11/19/2006 - 10:18pm
Liza's picture
Liza says:

Here's the straight dope: people do NOT get the flu from the flu shot. (I think one problem people have when talking about influenza is the misuse of the name "flu." We toss the word around to describe a whole host of illnesses, most of which are not actually influenza.)

Influenza symptoms usually come on quite suddenly and may include:

  • high fever (up to 106° when symptoms first develop),
  • shaking chills,
  • headache,
  • pain when you move your eyes,
  • extreme tiredness,
  • dry cough,
  • sore throat,
  • runny or stuffy nose,
  • body aches and muscle pain (particularly in the back, arms, and legs), and
  • occasionally vomiting or diarrhea, although these are more common in children than adults.

The fever lasts for 3-8 days, respiratory symptoms last 3-4 days after the fever breaks, and a cough may linger for up to 10 days after all other symptoms are gone. Recovery can take a week or two, and fatigue and weakness can last for several weeks.

(Having these symptoms does not always mean that you have the flu, however. Many different illnesses, including the common cold, can cause these symptoms.)

Side effects from the flu shot might include:

  • Soreness, redness, or swelling at the injection site,
  • low-grade fever, and
  • body aches.

These symptoms, IF they occur, tend to appear soon after the shot and last only a day or two.

So, no, I wouldn't say that a flu shot causes flu.

How can you tell a cold from the flu?
Your respiratory illness might be the flu if you have sudden onset of body aches, fever, and respiratory symptoms, and your illness occurs during November through April (the usual flu season in the Northern Hemisphere). However, during this time, other respiratory illnesses can cause similar symptoms and flu can be caught at any time of the year. It is impossible to tell for sure if you have the flu based on symptoms alone. Doctors can perform tests to see if you have the flu if you are in the first few days of your illness.

In general, the flu is worse than the common cold, and symptoms such as fever, body aches, extreme tiredness, and dry cough are more common and intense. Colds are usually milder than the flu. People with colds are more likely to have a runny or stuffy nose. Colds generally do not result in serious health problems, such as pneumonia, bacterial infections, or hospitalizations.

posted on Wed, 11/22/2006 - 5:02pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

No, maybe not but the flu shot can cause you to have flu like symptoms. Apparently from what I've read the flu shot is made up of many different toxic chemicals.

"Do you want any of the following vaccine constituents in YOUR bloodstream?

Ethylene glycol (antifreeze)

Phenol, also known as carbolic acid (this is used as a disinfectant, dye)

Formaldehyde, a known cancer-causing agent

Aluminum, which is associated with Alzheimer's disease and seizures and also cancer producing in laboratory mice (it is used as an additive to promote antibody response)

Thimerosal (a mercury disinfectant/preservative) can result in brain injury and autoimmune disease

Neomycin and Streptomycin (used as antibiotics) have caused allergic reaction in some people.
Vaccines are also grown and strained through animal or human tissue like monkey kidney tissue, chicken embryo, embryonic guinea pig cells, calf serum, and human diploid cells (the dissected organs of aborted human fetuses as in the case of rubella, hepatitis A, and chickenpox vaccines)."

You can find out more about it on http://www.mercola.com/2000/nov/26/flu_shots.htm.

Therefore no I will not get a flu shot this year because it has given me flu like symptoms in the past.

posted on Mon, 12/04/2006 - 5:06pm
Liza's picture
Liza says:

Your "vaccine recipe" is kind of misleading because it's just a mishmash of potential vaccine ingredients from all sorts of vaccines, including some (like the smallpox vaccine) that aren't part of the childhood vaccination schedule.

Aluminum sulfate, aluminum hydroxide, and aluminum phosphate are used as vaccine adjuvants (which boost the body's immune response and let us use less of the infectious agent). They're also used as preservatives. They've been used in this way for more than 70 years, and they've been extensively tested. Further, if you want to limit your exposure to these products, you'd be far better off reading your food labels--aluminum salts are EVERYWHERE, and you're getting far more exposure from products other than vaccines.

Thimerosal is NOT contained in any vaccines currently licensed for pediatric use and included in the routine childhood immunization schedule in the United States EXCEPT the flu shot. (And you can get a thimerosal-free flu vaccine if you ask for it.) Thimerosal has also been extensively evaluated, over decades, in hundreds of thousands of people, in different countries, and the link between thimerosal and, say, autism has been conclusively disproven.

Formaldehyde is essential for human metabolism and required for the synthesis of DNA and amino acids. All human beings have naturally-occurring formaldehyde in their systems. The Vaccine Education Center says,

"Assuming an average weight of a 2-month-old of 5 kg and an average blood volume of 85 ml per kg, the total quantity of formaldehyde found in an infant’s circulation would be about 1.1 mg — a value at least five-fold greater than that to which an infant would be exposed in vaccines. Second, quantities of formaldehyde at least 600–fold greater than that contained in vaccines have been given safely to animals."

Bovine serum and gelatin are growth factors used to help the viruses grow in special cells in the lab. ("Vesicle fluid from calf skins" is contained in the smallpox vaccine--since smallpox is similar to cowpox--but it's not part of routine childhood vaccines.)

Some vaccines (but by no means all) are grown in human fibroblast cells obtained from two therapeutic abortions done in the early 1960s. Those same cells have been growing in labs for decades. (And MRC-5 cells are some of those.) Deborah Wexler, MD, of the Immunization Action Coalition, tells me that,

"Although some vaccines are propagated in human diploid cell cultures developed from three fetuses aborted many years ago, aborted tissue cells are not currently found in today’s vaccines."

Some vaccines (but by no means all, and not many routine childhood vaccines) are grown in eggs, hence the occasional presence of chick cells.

As far as I know, monkey cells are potentially present only in the rabies vaccine. And if you're unlucky enough to need the rabies vaccine, the risk of NOT vaccinating FAR outweighs the risk of administering the vaccine, since rabies is virtually always fatal.

None of the elements you list is present in every vaccine, or present in significant amounts. When they are present, it's for a reason. The list may sound scary, but the truth isn't. "Education" about vaccines and vaccine safety doesn't start and end with a list of stuff that a vaccine may or may not contain. You have to know why each element is there, how it's processed, and what the real risks (based on data, not anecdotes on the Internet) are.

By the way, vaccines aren't "injected directly into your bloodstream." They're administered intramuscularly, subcutaneously, or intranasally.

All vaccine components are public information. Interested parties can read any vaccine package insert by going to the FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research’s page for approved products, clicking on the vaccine name, and then clicking on the “Label” link.

Lastly, the flu vaccine can cause fever and soreness at the injection site, but if you get the flu immediately after a flu shot, it's a coincidence. You were already harboring the influenza virus or, more likely, a cold virus that caused similar symptoms. The viral particles in the flu shot are inactivated (except for the ones in FluMist), and are incapable of causing the disease.

posted on Thu, 01/17/2008 - 3:55pm
Eric Tadsen's picture
Eric Tadsen says:

It's insane not to get a flu shot. The flu is extremely unpleasant and if a shot is likely to subvert it, so much the better. Some people think that it's better to get the flu and build your natural defenses, but that is actually not very useful. The virus mutates every year and you are unlikely to benefit from any long term immunity by getting the flu. In addition, should the H5N1 virus jump the species barrier, I want to be healthy and be able to fight it off, not have some other flu bogging me down.

Get the flu shot and then you won't infect me or your loved ones with the virus.

posted on Fri, 11/24/2006 - 2:28pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

your kids probably aren't eating enough healthy foods. Also, by constantly washing their hands you are not letting the good germs get in therefore they are more susceptible to viruses. i think more importantly than washing hands all the time is to eat foods that build up the immune system. Also, drinking lots of water helps. I suggest apples. I eat a lot of apples and i never get sick. Also the usual, plenty of rest, exercise and regular healthy eating habits. no junk food!

posted on Sun, 11/26/2006 - 9:16pm
Liza's picture
Liza says:

Handwashing is a staple of good hygiene. Washing your hands often (and I don't mean in an obsessive-compulsive sort of way, but after using the restroom, before every meal, whenever you know you've been in a very germy environment, after handling a pet, etc.) is the very best way to prevent the spread of a disease like the flu. Washing your hands certainly does NOT make you "more susceptible to viruses" by "not letting the good germs in."

(There is research that suggests that kids need to be exposed to germs in order to prime their immune systems, and that allergies may be related to immune systems in hyperdrive. But most kids get that exposure through siblings, daycare/school, pets, playing outside, etc.)

Eating healthy foods, staying hydrated, exercising regularly, and getting adequate sleep are, of course, vital to good health. But they, in themselves, will not keep you from getting the flu or any other infectious disease.

posted on Sun, 11/26/2006 - 11:45pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

same here

posted on Thu, 01/17/2008 - 2:13pm
Joe's picture
Joe says:

In our family, getting the flu shot is a event and a tradition. It started with my mom and I getting the shot, then treating ourselves to dinner. After a couple years, my dad started getting them, then my wife, and now my 6 month old will as well. So, we go as a gang to get the shots, and then out to a fun dinner afterwards. Making it be an event with a reward afterward helps us get motivated to get a shot in the arm.

posted on Sat, 09/23/2006 - 9:16pm
bryan kennedy's picture

I generally don't get flu shots or the flu. I guess because I am young and generally healthy it seems like a bad idea to get the flu shot when I don't really need it. But that opinion isn't based on any research...have to admit I am pretty in the dark about flu shots.

posted on Sun, 09/24/2006 - 5:35pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

Just because you don't get the flu often isn't a reason not to get a flu shot. That is like saying, "since I don't get in car accidents I shouldn't wear a seatbelt

posted on Sat, 10/28/2006 - 5:23pm
Brock's picture
Brock says:

In a matter of speaking, it is all based on chance as well as who you come into contact with on a daily basis. A person that generally interacts with a large number of people that don't interact with each other except on that chance occasion (such as at a department store) is more likely to come into contact with an individual that possesses some viral influenza. Individuals who mostly abstain from traditional, daily interaction with others is more likely not to catch the virus for some various obvious reasons. Taking steps to prevent yourself from catching the disease also helps. Not touching your face often and either avoiding touching high traffic areas of transmission (such as a railing or this keyboard that I'm typing on) will ultimately prevent contraction.

posted on Mon, 11/06/2006 - 1:55pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I don,t get the flu very often - or hardly ever anymore - and I dislike getting shots, so why mess with success? -especially if there are others (like those with low immune-deficiency systems) who really need to be vaccinted, they should be able to get those important shots.

posted on Wed, 09/27/2006 - 3:32pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

you are wrong

posted on Sun, 10/22/2006 - 12:05pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

People with autoimmune diseases should not get the shot or spray; people with allergies to preservatives should not have the nasal spray; and anyone affected by eggs should not get either the shot or the spray.

posted on Thu, 09/28/2006 - 10:40am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I haven't decided. I've gotten them in the past. But I've been reading too much stuff about them being harmful and now I am confused. With a deployed husband I can't afford to get the flu. I'm truly on the fence. Also I don't know if I should have the kids get flu shots. I've read that they don't really work in kids under 2.

`undecided in WA
Kids age, 8,6,23months and 6months

posted on Sun, 10/01/2006 - 3:09pm
Liza's picture
Liza says:

This study showed that the nasal spray vaccine, which isn't yet recommended for young children, is actually safe and effective in kids between the ages of 15 months and 6 years. (The spray has been approved and recommended for people older than 5.) It's not a huge study--only 1602 kids--but the protection looks impressive. And the nasal spray vaccine is also thimerosal-free, if that's what you worry about?

Here's another summary of a conference presentation, in which researchers showed that the nasal spray vaccine is safe and effective in kids older than 6 months. In fact, their data show that the nasal spray vaccine is much more effective than the injectable vaccine...

Studies show that, overall, influenza vaccines are 70-90% effective in preventing the illness. They also help to cut down on influenza's spread within a household, if someone should get sick, and to lessen influenza's severity and length of illness.

Scientists at Vanderbilt University found that 1 in 1000 preschoolers is hospitalized for complications due to seasonal influenza every year, and that rate is four times higher for very young children. Doctor visits for the flu are between 10 and 250 times more common than hospitalizations, depending on the age of the child.

Because you can be contagious before you show any symptoms, and because influenza is so transmissible, immunization is the best way to prevent the illness.

posted on Mon, 10/09/2006 - 2:17pm
Liza's picture
Liza says:

This week, at the Infectious Diseases Society of America meeting, researchers from the University of Washington in Seattle presented preliminary results of a study that showed that the injectable Fluzone vaccine, currently licensed for children older than six months and adults, is safe and produces an immune response in babies from six and 12 weeks old.

Dr. Janet Englund said,

"Children less than six months of age have actually the highest rate of hospitalization and medically attended (influenza) illnesses of any age group, including the very old. But there is no licensed vaccine for this age group."

Dr. Kathleen Neuzil, also of the University of Washington and senior clinical advisor for vaccines for PATH, a Seattle-based nonprofit international health advocacy organization, said,

"Certainly children younger than six months have high morbidity and at the moment we have nothing to offer them for protection. [The immune response seen in infants] isn't as good as in older children, but it's better than nothing and what we're doing right now is nothing. [And] even if you're only getting a moderate benefit, [at least] it's safe."

posted on Thu, 10/19/2006 - 12:02pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

i really dont like shots

posted on Tue, 10/03/2006 - 12:49pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I don't really like shots either, but it is a necessary part of you life. To be a health person you need them and It is just good for your ammune system. Just like the five second rule is good for your immune system.

posted on Thu, 10/19/2006 - 12:34pm
hamstergirl591's picture
hamstergirl591 says:

They're really not that scary, it's not like you're going to be in severe pain for the rest of your life, and it's just a little prick, it's not going to murder or anything. I know a girl that has to be drugged to get a shot because she's too scared.

posted on Thu, 12/14/2006 - 8:29pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

Although I do wind up getting the flu every year I am not getting the vaccine simply because you body is made to get sick. You have natural imunities that react to the flu virus. In my opinion all you are doing is weakening your natural immune system when you continually get shots to prevent a real infection. There is nothing wrong with getting sick taking some over the counter flu medicine for a few days that lower fevers and get rid of aches and pains.

posted on Tue, 10/03/2006 - 6:59pm
Liza's picture
Liza says:

Well, for those of us in good health and in the prime of life, getting the flu might just be an inconvenience. But for the very young, the very old, and those with chronic health conditions, catching the flu is a big deal. Every year, 200,000 people are hospitalized in the US due to flu complications, and 36,000 of those die. So it IS a real problem...

Further, I think perhaps you misunderstand how vaccines work? They contain weakened or killed pathogens, or proteins found on the outsides of pathogens, which trigger your body to produce antibodies, just like a real infection would. Your immune system is then primed to recognize those pathogens, and eliminate them before they can cause illness. Vaccines definitely do NOT "weaken your natural immune system."

posted on Mon, 10/09/2006 - 11:42am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I agree. While I'm sure it is beneficial to some, I believe that for the majority of the population, the flu shot should be avoided. We are weakening ourselves by over-vaccinating and also with the use of too many anti-bacterials. As mentioned earlier, many kinds of bacteria are beneficial to you. AND according to one of the posters in the Science Museum, too much antibacterial soaps or bleaches can kill the needed bacteria in your septic system.

posted on Tue, 10/24/2006 - 6:32pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I agree with you 100%. I also feel that we are weakening ourselves. Pretty soon we will have to get shots to stop something simple like a cold with the sniffles.

posted on Wed, 11/15/2006 - 1:25am
Isabelle's picture
Isabelle says:

i really have no idea...it depends on if my mom brings me:-)

posted on Wed, 10/04/2006 - 5:07pm
sorsha's picture
sorsha says:

absolutely not getting this vaccine. the flu vaccine is always a year behind because they cannot predict which strain will cause the flu in any coming year - they just base the vaccine off of last year's flu. the shot is full of garbage, including mercury.

a healthy diet is the single best prevention against sickness, but the CDC doesn't want to educate people about that. they just want to keep pushing drugs for the industry they are 'suppose' to be regulating. shameful.

posted on Thu, 10/05/2006 - 10:46am
Liza's picture
Liza says:

The flu vaccine is NOT "always a year behind." It can be tough to predict exactly which strain of influenza will hit, but vaccine makers include three influenza viruses (two A viruses and a B virus), all of which are circulating among people in that year, in the vaccines.

Each year, many laboratories throughout the world, including in the United States, collect flu viruses. Some of these flu viruses are sent to one of four World Health Organization (WHO) reference laboratories, including the one at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, for detailed testing. The labs also test how well antibodies made to the current vaccine react to the circulating virus and new flu viruses. This information, along with information about flu activity, is summarized and presented to an advisory committee of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and at a WHO meeting. These meetings result in the selection of three viruses (two subtypes of influenza A viruses and one influenza B virus) to go into flu vaccines for the following fall and winter. Usually, one or two of the three virus strains in the vaccine are changed each year.

The flu vaccine reduces the average person's chances of catching the flu by up to 80% during the season. But because the flu vaccine prevents infection with only a few of the viruses that can cause flu-like symptoms, getting the vaccine isn't a guarantee that you won't get sick during the season. But even if someone who's gotten the shot gets the flu, symptoms will usually be fewer and milder.

As for mercury...
Thimerosal is a very effective preservative that has been used since the 1930s to prevent contamination in some multi-dose vials of vaccines (preservatives are not required for vaccines in single dose vials). Thimerosal contains approximately 49% ethylmercury (NOT methylmercury). There is no convincing evidence of harm caused by the low doses of thimerosal in vaccines, except for minor reactions like redness and swelling at the injection site. However, in July 1999 the Public Health Service (PHS) agencies, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), and vaccine manufacturers agreed that thimerosal should be reduced or eliminated in vaccines as a precautionary measure.

Today, all routinely recommended licensed pediatric vaccines that are currently being manufactured for the US market, with the exception of influenza vaccine, are thimerosal-free, or contain only trace amounts. Thimerosal-free influenza vaccines are available, but in limited quantities. The total amount of inactivated influenza vaccine available without thimerosal as a preservative will continue to increase as manufacturing capabilities are expanded.

And while the majority of influenza vaccines distributed in the United States currently contain thimerosal as a preservative, some contain only trace amounts and are considered by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to be preservative-free. Manufacturers of preservative-free flu vaccine use thimerosal early in the manufacturing process. The thimerosal gets diluted as the vaccine goes through the steps in processing. By the end of the manufacturing process there is not enough thimerosal left in the vaccine to act as a preservative and the vaccine is labeled ‘preservative-free'.

But thimerosal-free influenza vaccine IS available.
Right now, sanofi pasteur is projecting that 8 million to 9 million doses of thimerosal-free vaccine in pre-filled syringes or vials will be produced for the 2006-07 influenza season. The majority of this vaccine will be in 0.25 mL syringes (indicated for ages 6-35 months) with the remainder in 0.5 mL vials or syringes (indicated for ages 36 months and older). In addition, GlaxoSmithKline’s influenza vaccine for adults 18 years of age and older is preservative-free vaccine and Novartis (formerly Chiron) has a preservative-free preparation for persons 4 years of age and older. Also, the nasal-spray influenza vaccine (sold commercially as FluMist®) does not contain any thimerosal and can be given to healthy people 5 to 49 years of age who are not pregnant.

So there are plenty of options for people who want to avoid thimerosal.

It's true that eating and resting properly can help you ward off infections, including the flu. And I don't think there is a doctor around who doesn't recommend eating right and getting plenty of rest as a matter of course. Truthfully, though, what's even more important is good hygiene. Contain your coughs and sneezes, and WASH YOUR HANDS! (And the CDC recommends all of these things, too.)

The CDC collects data on who's affected by the flu and what the outcomes are. Every year in the US 5-20% of the population catches influenza. More than 200,000 people require hospitalization due to influenza complications, and some 36,000 people die. Young children, older people, and people with certain chronic health conditions are more likely to experience complications. Vaccinating them, when possible, and vaccinating those around them, helps to protect everyone. THAT'S what the CDC is "pushing."

posted on Mon, 10/09/2006 - 11:32am
Robert Wolfe's picture
Robert Wolfe says:

Preservative free being available doesnt appear to be accurate. My wife is 3 months pregnant and I would like her to get a mercury free flu shot. I've called every Doctor in the phone books (seriously every one) and nobody has the preservative free except for Pediatricians who wont give it to pregnant women as they are saving for children. I can understand this but what a women eats, drinks, or injects passes to the baby so the fact the CDC is recommending that the flu shot is safe for pregnant women is mind boggling to me. We live in Raritan, NJ and we cannot find anyone who has a perservative free flu shot. No website and no Dr's office I called even knew who would have them. Some of them didnt even know what I was talking about which is scary to say the least. I had to walk them through the discussion.

Any suggestions???

posted on Fri, 11/24/2006 - 12:27pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I understand about your frustration becasue I am also 4 months pregnant and had also
tried to ask several doctors about the persevative free or mercury free flu shot. All they tell me is the regular flu shot is Ok and is safe and is recommended for pregnant women to take it although I told them that I want " persevation free flu shot". They don't seem to understand and don't know where I can get it.
I tried to ask around friends who had been pregant before and they said they didin't take the flu shot and they prefer not to take it... I went online and do some research that is better to take the mercury freee flu shot for pregnant women.

Good thing my sister in virgina is also pregnant and her doctor has the shot. So I'm planning to go over there. Good Luck to you!

posted on Sat, 11/25/2006 - 2:32pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I started getting the flu shot every year in college, and dont plan to stop anytime soon. I work too closely with the public to think that handwashing will be enough to stop the germs they bring in (especially the school kids!) I missed the shot for the first time 2 years ago during the shortage and was out of work for a week, miserable.

Other than the patients mentioned above (immunocompromised, egg allergy, preservative allergy) everyone who is able should get a flu shot. Yes, I have gotten other strains of the flu after having a shot, but always a mild strain.

posted on Thu, 10/05/2006 - 10:49am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I need to get my 13 year old flu shot i guess that is what my mom says anyways so yup i guess i'm getting a shot!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! WHich I hate!!!!!!! I don't do shots. Okay let me tell u a little story! Okay well i got braces and i'm going to be 13 in a couple of days...... anyways i still have BABY TEETH... But anyways so i got the braces and they didn't pull the baby teeth out before they put the braces on so then they told me that i had to get those 6 baby teeth pulled so i thought they would just take the braces off and then i would get the teeth pulled and then braces put back on... OKay like i said i don't do shots.... so they just took the wires off and they said i was getting 6 shots and i said no so for 6 teeth i went to a place where they gave me laughing gas and i feel asleep but u kno what i still got a freakin shot!!!!! in my arm well that's the story!!!!!!!

posted on Thu, 10/05/2006 - 10:55am
Carole's picture
Carole says:

I am a home health aide so I better get it for my clients sake.

posted on Fri, 10/06/2006 - 7:11pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

i won't be getting one because it's a pain and requires an extra visit. if you made it part of my regular check up, i would. i don't like the idea of putting extra stuff in my body---- guess those fries at lunch weren't the greatest choice, either.

posted on Sat, 10/07/2006 - 1:58pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I am because I hate to get sick. If i don't i am endangering my friends as well because they could get it from me

posted on Sun, 10/08/2006 - 4:48pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

not a good idea

posted on Mon, 10/09/2006 - 9:38am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

no i don't get sick.

posted on Wed, 10/11/2006 - 1:01pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

My parents say that i don't have to get one because i haven't
got sick sick sence i was two years old, and now i'm 10!

My friend syas it doen't heart cause she has to get one
every year!

posted on Sun, 11/26/2006 - 1:03pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I will get one because i touch buttons like these ones and then touch all over my face. Yuck!

posted on Wed, 10/11/2006 - 5:14pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

Is it true that bacteria killing soap raises bacterial resistance to antibiotics?

posted on Fri, 10/13/2006 - 9:35am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I will get the shot and so will my son. He has asthma and I work with children all day long as a school bus driver. Since parents don't keep their childeren home when they are sick because they can't afford to stay home from work they put me at risk of getting sick. I am a widow and cannot afford to be out of work. So I will be rolling up my sleeve as soon as I can.

posted on Sat, 10/14/2006 - 5:53pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

My job sends me into many differnt schools and public places. Twice in the last year i have gotten flu-like symptoms that wipe me out for alomst a week at a time. I didn't get the shot last year because of the shortage- i plan on getting one this year to be sure!

posted on Sun, 10/15/2006 - 10:35am
Bryce's picture
Bryce says:

Never have, and I have never gotten sick. Why mess with a good thing?

posted on Mon, 10/16/2006 - 10:32am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I dont need a flu shot because i'm still young sooo.. yeah.

posted on Mon, 10/16/2006 - 1:44pm
Alison's picture
Alison says:

I think especially for the elderly & those with a weak immune system, or those who help care for them a flu shot can be very beneficial.

For the general population it's not necessary, but if you are prone to getting really sick with the flu most years it's not a bad idea. Like most things in life some people are more sensitive to getting the flu than others, those who get really bad symptoms should probably get it.

I personally don't believe in medicating unless it's necessary, and being young & healthy I haven't gotten the shot in the past much. However, since being over in Europe (for the last 3 years) I have noticed that I get much sicker every winter over here than I did at home, mostly b/c I am not used to the strains of flu over here (I think). So I will probably get one this year just so hopefully do not get so sick. We'll see how it works out!

posted on Tue, 10/17/2006 - 8:31am
Karen's picture
Karen says:

I am getting the flu shot because I am a school bus driver and am around all sorts of colds and flu kids who shouldn't be going to school. My company is providing them and I think for very good reason.

posted on Tue, 10/17/2006 - 1:59pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

i already got one :=P

posted on Wed, 10/18/2006 - 10:28am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

i would get a shot because i dn't want to risk getting the flu. i hate the flu and it's a pain to get a shot but it's worth it.

posted on Wed, 10/18/2006 - 3:20pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I'm more of a cold person then a flu person which is fine with me.

posted on Thu, 10/19/2006 - 1:19pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

because I'm 61 years old and have asthma.

posted on Thu, 10/19/2006 - 3:38pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I think it hurts too much.

posted on Thu, 10/19/2006 - 5:57pm
Betsy's picture
Betsy says:

This is an interesting subject to be commenting on...

posted on Thu, 10/19/2006 - 6:48pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

idonotwantone.

posted on Fri, 10/20/2006 - 2:21pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

dumb not to

posted on Fri, 10/20/2006 - 3:08pm
Nikki's picture
Nikki says:

I always get the flu around winter time, but i get oer it really fast.So i dont need a a flu shot to get rid of it for me.

posted on Fri, 10/20/2006 - 4:18pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

To stay healthy

posted on Fri, 10/20/2006 - 4:33pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I never get sick! (knock on wood)

posted on Sat, 10/21/2006 - 5:53pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

My mother always gets her flu shot considering she's had pnemonia four times. As a result, we are brought with.

posted on Sat, 10/21/2006 - 6:17pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

i hate flu shots

posted on Mon, 10/23/2006 - 2:18pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

usally get a shot just have to make time

posted on Mon, 10/23/2006 - 4:39pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I am getting the shot because the company I work for pays for it.

posted on Mon, 10/23/2006 - 6:30pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

If I have bad allergies, is it okay to get the flu vaccine?

posted on Tue, 10/24/2006 - 4:51pm
Liza's picture
Liza says:

As long as you're not allergic to eggs or to any of the specific ingredients in the flu vaccine, getting the flu vaccine should be fine.

posted on Tue, 10/24/2006 - 5:31pm
Karen's picture
Karen says:

Asthma

posted on Fri, 10/27/2006 - 4:46pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

shots help you but they hurt. a lot

posted on Fri, 10/27/2006 - 5:45pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I work for a local health department and while I am not a nurse we just had a meeting this morning where they talked to us about the flu vaccine. Some of the things people have stated in the comments above are not entirely correct. Liza has done a good job clearing up the misconceptions. Thanks Liza!`
The shot does not give you the flu. It is a dead vaccine except for the nasal spray which is a live vaccine. That is why people should be healthy if they get the nasal dose. Find out more before you judge it.
Another misconception is that often people think they have the 'flu' when they really have a gastro. illness (GI) such as food poisoning, etc. The flu that the vaccine is made for is respiratory in nature. You wouldn't likely get rid of the flu "really fast" as someone stated above. That was probably a GI problem.
I urge everyone to become educated about the flu and to contact your health care provider or local health department for more information. All who are eligible should get a flu shot. I get one every year and have never had any effects from the shot, nor have I ever had the flu.

posted on Fri, 10/27/2006 - 7:46pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

In the last 15 years I have received one flu shot. It was in that year that I contracted the flu. Does this mean that I am lucky or could it be that I have a stronger immune system than most?

posted on Tue, 12/12/2006 - 6:53pm
Eric K.'s picture
Eric K. says:

I don't neccessarly believe in western medicine. There are many measures you should and/or could take in order to minimize your risk of getting the flu in the first place.

Also, why would add a weakend strain of virus to your system. It's obviously not something that was intented to happen. If you are succpetable to viruses then I suppose it would be worth while.

Try homeopathic remedies.
You might be suprised.

Remember we are only energy.

posted on Sat, 10/28/2006 - 11:07am
Liza's picture
Liza says:

Homeopathic remedies are not supported by science or the medical community because there is no way to test them.

If something is truly homeopathic, the "active ingredient" is so diluted that it can't even be detected. (Most homeopathic products are diluted 6X to 30X, and sometimes even more. A 30X dilution means that the original substance has been diluted 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 times.)

From Quackwatch's "Homeopathy: The Ultimate Fake":

"Oscillococcinum, a 200C product 'for the relief of colds and flu-like symptoms,' involves 'dilutions' that are even more far-fetched. Its 'active ingredient' is prepared by incubating small amounts of a freshly killed duck's liver and heart for 40 days. The resultant solution is then filtered, freeze-dried, rehydrated, repeatedly diluted, and impregnated into sugar granules. If a single molecule of the duck's heart or liver were to survive the dilution, its concentration would be 1 in 100200. This huge number, which has 400 zeroes, is vastly greater than the estimated number of molecules in the universe (about one googol, which is a 1 followed by 100 zeroes). In its February 17, 1997, issue, U.S. News & World Report noted that only one duck per year is needed to manufacture the product, which had total sales of $20 million in 1996. The magazine dubbed that unlucky bird 'the $20-million duck.'

Actually, the laws of chemistry state that there is a limit to the dilution that can be made without losing the original substance altogether. This limit, which is related to Avogadro's number, corresponds to homeopathic potencies of 12C or 24X (1 part in 1024). Hahnemann himself realized that there is virtually no chance that even one molecule of original substance would remain after extreme dilutions. But he believed that the vigorous shaking or pulverizing with each step of dilution leaves behind a 'spirit-like' essence—'no longer perceptible to the senses'—which cures by reviving the body's 'vital force.' Modern proponents assert that even when the last molecule is gone, a 'memory' of the substance is retained. This notion is unsubstantiated. Moreover, if it were true, every substance encountered by a molecule of water might imprint an 'essence' that could exert powerful (and unpredictable) medicinal effects when ingested by a person.

Many proponents claim that homeopathic products resemble vaccines because both provide a small stimulus that triggers an immune response. This comparison is not valid. The amounts of active ingredients in vaccines are much greater and can be measured. Moreover, immunizations produce antibodies whose concentration in the blood can be measured, but high-dilution homeopathic products produce no measurable response. In addition, vaccines are used preventively, not for curing symptoms."

posted on Wed, 12/13/2006 - 11:15am
Jac's picture
Jac says:

Well here is my take on this.. I am 35 and have been vaccinated. However since becoming a mother and not just taking what a doctor says as " Holy words" I have come to the realization that we do over vaccinate. I was actually fired from my family doctor because I told him I was not immunizing my children. He gave me every reason to try and convince me that I should.. People need to realize that they have a CHOICE. I am not saying vaccinating is a bad thing. I just think if people want to research, then they should not just reach out to their family physician for answers. They DON'T KNOW EVERYTHING.
Furthermore, I did find a new family physician and he was appalled that I was let go from my previous physician. I told him that I will always tell my children as they get older that they are not immunized and that if they have a wish to travel etc then they should research what disease is prevalent in that community. Like if they had a desire to travel to India then they may want to inquire about a Polio vaccine etc,.. He also explained to me that many of his patients have chosen not to immunize their children and he just reminds them of certain risks that they need to keep in mind but doesn't go on like their children are going to start a pandemic if they're not immunized. And he certainly doesn't fire them. My children go in for their annual checkup and I think my doctor is grateful that I am not going in their all the time for a sniffle here or there.
The medical field does not tell you of all the children that have died from getting vaccinated but will be the first to tell you that homeopathy is not recognized by the Medical community.. Well hello?? of course its not because vaccinating is their "bread and butter" so of course they are not going to give it their blessings.
My best friend is constantly saying.. Your kids are NEVER sick, and mine seem to be all the time. Don't get me wrong, my kids have had the odd cold and runny noses but they are healthy, take multivitamins, vitamin C and garlic when things are going around the school. I make sure they are washing their hands and I am constantly reminding them to not put toys, etc in their mouth and away from their face. I spray their rooms with Lysol a couple times a month when they are not home and they are encouraged to play outside a lot, to get fresh air. Both have never gotten the flu. My girlfriend is clean crazy and her kids are sick a lot and are all vaccinated. Also I am tired of ignorant people(and doctors) saying I am harming my kids and that I am putting their kids at risk.. Well HELLO AGAIN>> If your kids are vaccinated then what are they going to get from my children...???? If anything my children would be more at risk, but still to date have not been seriously sick. I breast fed both of my children for a total of 3 years. I sincerely believe if vaccinating your children is best suited for your family life, like perhaps they are in daycare and are around many different environments then that is what is best for your situation. But don't knock other people who are not vaccinating their children. To re iterate we are OVER VACCINATING. The next thing you know they'll come out with a vaccine to prevent ingrown toenails!! Approximately 30% of the population is not vaccinated and it is a personal choice. Don't get me wrong if one of my children step on a rusty nail then I would not be ignorant and not take them to get a tetnus shot at the hospital. I in fact sliced my finger on a can lid (just last year) and I went to get a tetnus shot and 2 stitches. Because I believed that even though my chances of contracting the disease was like under 1%, getting it would be deadly.. So I chose for the shot.
But I do believe and so does my husband that our bodies do need to fight and build up antibodies on their own. And of course, a well rounded healthy diet, and fresh air is essential. We are also expecting another child and with this one as well, we will not be vaccinating.

posted on Wed, 03/21/2007 - 9:20am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I have a good immune system and want to put as few toxins in my body as possible, therefore, by taking vitamin C at the onset of the flu I should remain healthy thoughout the season, also, my immune system will be stronger and more efficient.

posted on Sat, 10/28/2006 - 2:17pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

Because I have to where I work* I could possibly be a health hazard to the elderly and young.

posted on Sat, 10/28/2006 - 7:58pm
Brynne's picture
Brynne says:

I will be getting a flu shot because I live in the dorms at UMD and everyone gets sick all the time!!!

posted on Sun, 10/29/2006 - 12:31pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

For our family, we believe that the risk of getting the particular strain of flu that is vaccinated against is not outweighed by the uncertain benefits of the vaccine. Further, we believe that the vaccine actually weakens the immune system at a critical time, thus making our family more susceptible to OTHER strains of the flu and other illnesses. We prefer to acquire our immunities naturally.

posted on Sun, 10/29/2006 - 1:55pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

never had one and never got sick.so i dont need one.

posted on Sun, 10/29/2006 - 2:04pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

shots hurt!!!

posted on Sun, 10/29/2006 - 3:53pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

i dont want to

posted on Tue, 10/31/2006 - 12:23pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I hate the flu shot but i have never got the flu before.

posted on Tue, 10/31/2006 - 2:42pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

i probably will not get a flu shot because i already got one earlier in the year.

-Matt

posted on Wed, 11/01/2006 - 2:51pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

i cant

posted on Thu, 11/02/2006 - 1:19pm
Greg's picture
Greg says:

I will be getting a flu shot becasue my company will be paying for them. They try to keep me healthy so I don't have to miss any work! Isn't that nice of them?

posted on Fri, 11/03/2006 - 11:06am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I think everyone should geta flu shot uless they want to risk dying of a very harmful diease.
if you don't have enogh monet to get a flu shot, then avoid other people and the outside world.

posted on Sat, 11/04/2006 - 3:10pm
bailee houska's picture
bailee houska says:

hi this is bailee houska. i would like to say that i dont think that people will half to get flu shots this year. i think that because we never get flu shots so i dont think that we should half to get them this year

posted on Sat, 11/04/2006 - 5:28pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

because i dont need to i dont get sick at all

posted on Sat, 11/04/2006 - 6:02pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

the smart thing to do if you have kids in school

posted on Sat, 11/04/2006 - 7:37pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I already got one.My daughter has asthma and is more vulnerable to illness so our whole family gets a shot..

posted on Sun, 11/05/2006 - 3:45pm
Brendan Sanders's picture
Brendan Sanders says:

I think that this exibit is very cool and I think that the bodies look really amazing I think that you should make more bodies and put them in the exibit for people to look at like different aniimals I thought the horse looked really cool.

posted on Mon, 11/06/2006 - 12:25pm
Sarah k Scott's picture
Sarah k Scott says:

I already got my SHOT >_< it hurts and did i mention it hurts!

But... its good for you too... i dont know wether its better to just get the shot or get the flu...*ponders thought* id rather get shot in the arm with an neddle than get the flu.

... once i got the flu for about a month then i gota nmonia for about another month... IT SUCKS BEING SICK!!

Thats all 4 now! :) BYE!

posted on Mon, 11/06/2006 - 2:05pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

cus i hate shots

posted on Mon, 11/06/2006 - 2:26pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

i hate shots - period!

posted on Mon, 11/06/2006 - 3:29pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I don't mind the shot (I donate blood about every year).

I just don't feel I need it even though it is being given free at work now as I write.

I've never had the flu (knock on wood) and don't recall ever having any type of fever or ever really being sick beyond the common cold or migraine.

Even when the whole family is sick, I seem to always be fine. Thank God for a strong immune system. Plus I stay fit and healthy. Maybe when I'm a lot older I should....

posted on Tue, 11/07/2006 - 11:11am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I don't know of anybody (that I talk to) getting a flu shot this fall... I know I'm not!!! Don't want to either! P.S. I liked everything BUT the Body Worlds... it was gross!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

posted on Tue, 11/07/2006 - 1:09pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I get the flu shot every year because i have asthma and allergies. So it protects me from getting really, really sick. And it doesn't hurt i think everyone should get the shot.

posted on Tue, 11/07/2006 - 1:09pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I am getting a flu shot because my grandma is making me get one because she says that i will get the flu and die

posted on Wed, 11/08/2006 - 1:31pm
Cheryl's picture
Cheryl says:

You're grandma probably remembers the great flu epidemic of 1918, that killed hundreds of thousands of people across the world. It was an amazing epidemic, and even if she wasn't old enough to live through it, she probably heard plenty of stories about it from her relatives. If you're a reader, I would recommend the book "The Great Influenza: The Epic Story of the Deadliest Plague in History" by John Barry. It's truly amazing how the scientists at that time were able to figure out what caused the epidemic and how to treat it. It makes getting a flu shot sound like a piece of cake compared to what the victims went through....

posted on Tue, 11/14/2006 - 11:45am
Liza's picture
Liza says:

Cheryl, I'm so glad you recommended "The Great Influenza." I thought it was a great read.

If you're interested in infectious diseases, here's some more recommended reading:

Barry, John M. (2004) The Great Influenza: The Epic Story of the Deadliest Plague In History. New York, NY: Penguin Group (USA) Inc. (Viking).

"In the winter of 1918, the coldest the American Midwest had ever endured, history's most lethal influenza virus was born. Over the next year it flourished, killing as many as 100 million people. It killed more people in twenty-four weeks than AIDS killed in twenty-four years, more people in a year than the Black Death of the Middle Ages killed in a century. There were many echoes of the Middle Ages in 1918: victims turned blue-black and priests in some of the world's most modern cities drove horse-drawn carts down the streets, calling upon people to bring out their dead.
But 1918 was not the Middle Ages, and the story of this epidemic is not simply one of death, suffering, and terror; it is the story of one war imposed upon the background of another. For the first time in history, science collided with epidemic disease, and great scientists—pioneers who defined modern American medicine—pitted themselves against a pestilence. The politicians and military commanders of World War I, focusing upon a different type of enemy, ignored warnings from these scientists and so fostered conditions that helped the virus kill. The strain of these two wars put society itself under almost unimaginable pressure. Even as scientists began to make progress, the larger society around them began to crack.
Yet ultimately this is a story of triumph amidst tragedy, illuminating human courage as well as science. In particular, this courage led a tenacious investigator directly to one of the greatest scientific discoveries of the twentieth century—a discovery that has spawned many Nobel prizes and even now is shaping the future.
Magisterial in its breadth of perspective and depth of research, spellbinding in the multiple narrative threads it weaves together, with characters ranging from William Welch, the founding head of Johns Hopkins Medical School, to John D. Rockefeller and Woodrow Wilson, The Great Influenza is a brilliant depiction of individuals put to the most extreme test. Their response to this crisis provides a precise and sobering model for our world as we confront AIDS and other, as yet unknown, diseases."

Garrett, Laurie. (1995) The Coming Plague: Newly Emerging Diseases in a World Out of Balance. New York, NY: Penguin Books.

"Unpurified drinking water. Improper use of antibiotics. Local warfare. Massive refugee migration. Changing social and environmental conditions around the world have fostered the spread of new and potentially devastating viruses and diseases—AIDS, Lassa, Ebola, and others. Laurie Garrett takes you on a fifty-year journey through the world's battles with microbes and examines the worldwide conditions that have culminated in recent outbreaks of newly discovered diseases, epidemics of diseases migrating to new areas, and mutated old diseases that are no longer curable. She argues that it is not too late to take action to prevent the further onslaught of viruses and microbes, and offers possible solutions for a healthier future."

Garrett, Laurie. (2000) Betrayal of Trust: The Collapse of Global Public Health. New York, NY: Hyperion.

"In this meticulously researched and ultimately explosive new book by the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and bestselling author of The Coming Plague, Laurie Garrett takes on perhaps the most crucial global issue of our time. She asks: Is our collective health in a state of decline? If so, how dire is this crisis, and has the public health system itself contributed to it? Using riveting detail and finely honed storytelling, Garrett exposes the underbelly of the world's globalization to find out if it can still be assumed that government can and will protect the people's health, or if that trust has been irrevokably broken."

posted on Tue, 11/14/2006 - 12:08pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

because i never get the flu

posted on Thu, 11/09/2006 - 12:51pm
Abbi's picture
Abbi says:

my parent does not believe in shots unless it is for a disease

and i hate shots a lot

posted on Fri, 11/10/2006 - 2:15pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

To keep safe grandparents.

posted on Fri, 11/10/2006 - 2:34pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I don't like the fact that we are creating a super bug that we will have a hard time treating someday

posted on Sat, 11/11/2006 - 1:44pm
Liza's picture
Liza says:

Overuse of antibiotics is contributing to the evolution of "superbugs," but the use of vaccines is not.

posted on Tue, 11/14/2006 - 11:36am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

i never get a flu shot i tough it up

posted on Sat, 11/11/2006 - 2:13pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

Nope, I havent and I wont. Oh well

posted on Sat, 11/11/2006 - 6:55pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I'm doing it because my wife wants me to.

posted on Sun, 11/12/2006 - 5:29pm
Leah's picture
Leah says:

I will be getting a flu shot because last year I was sick for more than two weeks with the flu. It was the worst time of my life! I suggest you all stray away as far as you can from being contaminated with the flu. It truly SUCKS.

posted on Sun, 11/12/2006 - 6:05pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

A flu shot hurts and I think it may give me the flu rather than preventing it.

posted on Sun, 11/12/2006 - 6:30pm
Liza's picture
Liza says:

You cannot get the flu from a flu shot.

The injectable vaccine contains a killed virus that is unable to cause illness, although your body recognizes its proteins and makes antibodies against it.

The nasal spray vaccine contains "attenuated, cold-adapted, and temperature sensitive" viruses. That means

"...the viruses are weakened and will not cause severe symptoms often associated with influenza illness. Cold-adapted and temperature sensitive mean the viruses can grow in the nose and throat, but not in the lower respiratory tract where the temperature is higher."

(CDC fact sheet)

posted on Tue, 11/14/2006 - 12:00pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I am somewhat apprehensive about getting a Flu Shot because
I have heard of people (teachers) who have gotten vaccinated and have then suffered adverse and scary reactions. Also, because of these possible negstive reactions, I have heard that, after getting vaccinated, one should wait at least 15 minutes to see how their bodies react. And then I have also heard of someone who reaccted adversly later that night.

posted on Mon, 11/13/2006 - 5:02pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

there are more harmful things in a flu shot then heealthy things

posted on Tue, 11/14/2006 - 10:40am
Liza's picture
Liza says:

I hear this a lot, but it just isn't so.

One risk associated with the flu shot is an increased chance of developing Guillain-Barre syndrome. (A recent study shows that a flu shot seems to increase the risk of Guillain-Barre by about 45%.) But the absolute risk of developing Guillain-Barre, even with a flu shot, is very, very low, while the benefit of getting a flu shot, in terms of preventing illness and lost work/school time, is high. (Here's what the CDC says about influenza vaccination and Guillain-Barre.)

Many people also worry about thimerosal (a preservative) in vaccines. According to the CDC,

"Today, all routinely recommended licensed pediatric vaccines that are currently being manufactured for the U.S. market, with the exception of influenza vaccine, contain no thimerosal or only trace amounts. Thimerosal preservative-free influenza vaccines are available, but in limited quantities. The total amount of inactivated influenza vaccine available without thimerosal as a preservative will continue to increase as manufacturing capabilities are expanded.

The majority of influenza vaccines distributed in the United States currently contain thimerosal as a preservative. However, some contain only trace amounts of thimerosal and are considered by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to be preservative-free. Manufacturers of preservative-free flu vaccine use thimerosal early in the manufacturing process. The thimerosal gets diluted as the vaccine goes through the steps in processing. By the end of the manufacturing process there is not enough thimerosal left in the vaccine to act as a preservative and the vaccine is labeled ‘preservative-free'.

At the current time, sanofi pasteur is projecting that 8 million to 9 million doses of thimerosal-free vaccine in pre-filled syringes or vials will be produced for the 2006-07 influenza season. The majority of this vaccine will be in 0.25 mL syringes (indicated for ages 6-35 months) with the remainder in 0.5 mL vials or syringes (indicated for ages 36 months and older). In addition, GlaxoSmithKline’s influenza vaccine for adults 18 years of age and older is preservative-free vaccine and Novartis (formerly Chiron) has a preservative-free preparation for persons 4 years of age and older. Also, the nasal-spray influenza vaccine (sold commercially as FluMist®) does not contain any thimerosal and can be given to healthy people 5 to 49 years of age who are not pregnant."

If you're young and healthy, and have no other high risk factors for influenza, you could skip the shot and not think too much about it. But if you have contact with people in higher risk groups, especially people who can't be vaccinated themselves for one reason or another, then you really should consider it.

posted on Tue, 11/14/2006 - 11:50am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I don't like the idea of adding a virus to a healthy body.

posted on Tue, 11/14/2006 - 4:02pm
Taurean Conley's picture
Taurean Conley says:

because i have asthma

posted on Tue, 11/14/2006 - 5:51pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

i think the better question is why not....

posted on Wed, 11/15/2006 - 4:37pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

Yes, because we have asthma!

posted on Wed, 11/15/2006 - 6:47pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

very cool and very helpful for my asthhma

posted on Thu, 11/16/2006 - 11:23am
Moe Omar's picture
Moe Omar says:

I am a scientologist and i dont believe in medicine

posted on Thu, 11/16/2006 - 11:46am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

shot should only be given to old people and little babies

posted on Thu, 11/16/2006 - 4:58pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

My Mom made me.

posted on Thu, 11/16/2006 - 8:03pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

i will not be getting a flu this fall because i already had one

posted on Fri, 11/17/2006 - 12:44pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

i got my flu shot too!!!!!!!!!!

posted on Fri, 11/17/2006 - 1:06pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

no because im not sick

posted on Fri, 11/17/2006 - 3:12pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I said that i will not be getting a flu shot this winter, because i cannot afford one. otheri=wise i might. plus i am pretty unknowledgeable on the subject. when i was younger i got the flu and nothing that life threatining happened, so why should i spend approximently $25-$45 on a flu shot when i have survived the flu in the past?

posted on Fri, 11/17/2006 - 4:44pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

i think it is only a good idea if it is llife threatening. the fact that you get a small dose of the virus that you are suppose to be combating seems rather crazy to me. what genius thought of that!!! wash your hands and don't pick your nose!!!

posted on Fri, 11/17/2006 - 9:44pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

yes i'll get one because they're proven effective for me (when i get a shot i don't get the flu and vice versa). also i believe in herd immunity.

posted on Sun, 11/19/2006 - 6:36pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

because i have to

posted on Tue, 11/21/2006 - 3:06pm
Seth Zacher's picture
Seth Zacher says:

I cant get my flu shot because I'm too poor!

posted on Wed, 11/22/2006 - 10:53am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

why insert the flu when you can get it naturally!!!

posted on Wed, 11/22/2006 - 3:36pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

My little sister gets the flu really easily so i am gettinig a flu shot this year!

posted on Fri, 11/24/2006 - 2:55pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

b/c i dont see the need to get a shot every SINGLE year...and as lomg as you take care of yur health, you should be fine!

posted on Fri, 11/24/2006 - 8:05pm
kellyAnonymous's picture
kellyAnonymous says:

I'd rather get the flu. How about you?

posted on Sat, 11/25/2006 - 12:10pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

Cause my mom made me and my sister get one.

posted on Sat, 11/25/2006 - 1:23pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

cause all the cool people get them

posted on Sat, 11/25/2006 - 1:49pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

i didnt take a shot, instead i took a LAIV vaccine through a nasal spray! :D

posted on Sat, 11/25/2006 - 6:18pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

it does not hurt..

posted on Sun, 11/26/2006 - 2:37pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

Because I don't have the time or money.

posted on Sun, 11/26/2006 - 10:20pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I need a flu shot to remain healthy and not get the flu this winter

posted on Mon, 11/27/2006 - 1:01pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

i might get the flu because i did not get a flu shot.

posted on Mon, 11/27/2006 - 1:52pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

i got mine last week so i am good

posted on Mon, 11/27/2006 - 9:25pm
hamstergirl591's picture
hamstergirl591 says:

I already got mine at school (I'm 14) and it did not hurt one bit. I mean it felt like she tapped ne on the arm with her finger. I'm the opposite of everyone else, I actually like shots.

posted on Thu, 12/14/2006 - 8:22pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

At school we get it for free. :) too bad that im petrified of them :(

posted on Mon, 01/15/2007 - 11:52pm
Rin's picture
Rin says:

I havn't had the flu shot since I was in grade four. i am now in Grade 8 and I have only had the flu twice. PEOPLE DON'T NEED FLU SHOTS!

posted on Tue, 01/23/2007 - 2:12pm
Liza's picture
Liza says:

Let's see: you're healthy and young, and you've had the flu twice in 4 years... Not exactly a great argument for not getting the shot! :)

You certainly have the right to refuse a flu shot. And you're not considered part of a high-risk category of people in any case. But what if you lived with or had a lot of contact with an elderly or infant relative? They don't have the same level of immunity and immune response as you do, and the complications can be dangerous for them.

Some people DO need flu shots.

posted on Tue, 01/23/2007 - 5:08pm
shots r evil's picture
shots r evil says:

i hate shots they scare me i dont wanna get a flu shot i am always sacerd that they hurt shots are evil

posted on Thu, 02/22/2007 - 1:54pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I don't like shots either )O:

posted on Thu, 02/22/2007 - 5:18pm
Steve's picture
Steve says:

I'm a little skeptical of the flu shot, especially after this week, but everyone I know keeps telling me I should be getting the flu shot every year.

I'm 32 years old and I have gotten the flu shot twice in the last 10 years. I have a small child that started daycare this year so I go the flu shot. The only two times I have gotten the flu in the last 10 years are both the years I got the flu shot.

I'm just finishing up 30 hours of vomiting and diarhea and I'm really annoyed. I did see a nurse yesterday and she told me I had the stomach flu. I guess the flu shot doesn't cover "stomach flu." My wife will probably make me get the shot again next year, but if I get the flu again next year I'm never getting it again.

posted on Thu, 01/17/2008 - 10:53am
Liza's picture
Liza says:

The common names we assign to illnesses are confusing, aren't they?

The "flu shot" protects against influenza--an infection caused by the influenza virus, which affects mostly the nose, throat, bronchi, and sometimes lungs. According to the World Health Organization,

"Infection usually lasts for about a week, and is characterized by sudden onset of high fever, aching muscles, headache and severe malaise, non-productive cough, sore throat and rhinitis."

While the symptoms are similar to those of the common cold, influenza is much more severe, and takes longer to recover from. And, of course, it can be deadly. According to the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC),

"Every year in the United States, on average 5% to 20% of the population gets the flu; more than 200,000 people are hospitalized from flu complications, and; about 36,000 people die from flu. Some people, such as older people, young children, and people with certain health conditions, are at high risk for serious flu complications."

"Stomach flu," medically known as viral gastroenteritis, could be caused by any of a whole bunch of viruses (rotaviruses, adenoviruses, Norwalk-type viruses, etc.) and affects the stomach and small intestine. Symptoms usually last 1-3 days.

Don't give up on flu shots because you've come down with gastroenteritis. It's kind of like saying you're not getting your tetanus shot because it didn't protect you against the chicken pox.

Hope you're feeling better soon.

posted on Thu, 01/17/2008 - 1:25pm

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