Minnesota Geology Safari

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<strong>Cliffs at Tettegouce State Park</strong><br />Many Minnesota state parks hold interesting and beautiful geologic features. This cliff at Tettegouche was eroded by water. The reddish color in the rocks comes from small amounts of iron.<strong>Banded iron formation</strong><br />This banded rock at the Soudan Mine shows layers of iron formation. Deposited at the bottom of the sea some 2.7 billion years ago, they were folded by the movements of continental plates.<strong>Black sand</strong><br />Sand comes in many colors, thanks to various minerals mixed in among the grains. The black sand here contains magnetite, a form of iron.<strong>Can you ID this fossil?</strong><br />I spotted a rock with these two apparent fossils in the dry stream bed of Minehaha Creek.  Each impression is about 3/4 of an inch across and 1/2+ inch deep.  My thought is that they are external mold fossils of horn coral. What do you think?<strong>Cliffs at Tettegouce State Park</strong><br />Many Minnesota state parks hold interesting and beautiful geologic features. This cliff at Tettegouche was eroded by water. The reddish color in the rocks comes from small amounts of iron.<strong>Flow contact near Tofte, Minnesota</strong><br />Not all rocks erode at the same rate. At this site near Tofte, the upper rocks wore away easily. The lower rocks were better able to withstand the punishing waters of Lake Superior.<strong>Glacial till</strong><br />Forces of nature move rocks around. A retreating glacier deposited this pile of rocks and dirt, or till, at the end of the last Ice Age. Today, Heartbreak Creek erodes the pile, washing out the stones.<strong>Iron mine near Virginia, Minnesota</strong><br />Red rocks with traces of iron line the side of this abandoned, flooded mine near Virginia (north of Duluth). The iron that supported Minnesota’s mining industry came from undersea volcanoes more than two billion years ago.<strong>Layered rocks near Chisholm</strong><br />These thin layers of rock near Chisholm contain various types of iron. Combined with oxygen and hydrogen in different arrangements, each type has its own color.<strong>Mystery Cave</strong><br />Mystery Cave near Preston was carved out by water from glaciers melting at the end of the last Ice Age. Even today, water from heavy rains fills the underground chambers and continues to erode the limestone.<strong>Pipestone Creek waterfall</strong><br />Pipestone Creek in southwest Minnesota carved this waterfall through Sioux quartzite. The rock appears red because it contains small amounts of iron.<strong>Slate and greywacke at Jay Cooke State Park</strong><br />Layers of slate and greywacke—also known as "dirty sandstone"--stick out of the St. Louis River at Jay Cooke State Park.<strong>Unique sandstone outcrop</strong><br />Wind and rain sculpted this sandstone outcrop in Dakota County. The sandstone that underlies much of southern Minnesota is soft and easily eroded.
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

i think it is shell

posted on Sun, 03/13/2011 - 1:06pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

i think its a shell

posted on Fri, 08/20/2010 - 11:24am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

i loved the t-rex and the terridactial!

my favorite animal of all the dinasours is...the dinasour shark.

-Earl

posted on Wed, 08/11/2010 - 2:18pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

awesome dinosaus

posted on Sun, 08/08/2010 - 2:26pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

that rock picture was really awesome!!!i have been clif
jumping in ely!!!!!!!!!!!!!! it was awesome!!!!!! (and totally cool!!)lol!!!b4n!

posted on Wed, 07/28/2010 - 3:00pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

i think is a dinosaur

posted on Wed, 07/14/2010 - 5:30pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I think you're right, I'd have to know what age the rock is though, depends where it fell from. MN has a lot of ordovician fossils just because those are the age of rocks exposed around here.

posted on Tue, 07/13/2010 - 10:35am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

its p retty interesting!!

posted on Sun, 06/27/2010 - 2:31pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

Ya it dose look amazing !!!!!

posted on Thu, 07/29/2010 - 12:38pm
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Anonymous says:

I think that these pictures are really amazing and I think that it is cool that they are from our home state.

posted on Sun, 06/20/2010 - 2:18pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

this place is awesome!

posted on Thu, 05/27/2010 - 9:47am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous says:

I think it is that of a dinosaur.

posted on Sat, 04/03/2010 - 3:33pm

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